Thursday, July 24, 2014

The Sun Makers

The Gatherer (Richard Leech) is thrown
off the top of a tall building, but doesn't
go without demonstrating his famous
impression of Kenneth Williams first
Four episodes (Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four)
First broadcast Nov 26 to Dec 17 1977
Average audience for serial: 8.83m

CAST

Tom Baker (The Doctor) Born Jan 20 1934
Doctor Who credits
Played: The Doctor in Robot, The Ark in Space, The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, Planet of Evil, Pyramids of Mars, The Android Invasion, The Brain of Morbius, The Seeds of Doom, The Masque of Mandragora, The Hand of Fear, The Deadly Assassin, The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang, Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers, Underworld, The Invasion of Time, The Ribos Operation, The Pirate Planet, The Stones of Blood, The Androids of Tara, The Power of Kroll, The Armageddon Factor, Destiny of the Daleks, City of Death, The Creature from the Pit, Nightmare of Eden, The Horns of Nimon, Shada (unbroadcast), The Leisure Hive, Meglos, Full Circle, State of Decay, Warriors' Gate, The Keeper of Traken, Logopolis (1974-81). Return appearances in The Five Doctors (1983, archive footage), Dimensions in Time (1993), The Day of the Doctor (2013, as The Curator - but I think we all know who he was really!).
Tom also played the Doctor in the 1975 audio story Doctor Who and the Pescatons, and in several BBC and Big Finish audios since 2009.
Played: Meglos in Meglos (1980)
Career highlights
Tom's career began with a 1968 adaptation of The Winter's Tale, followed by roles in George and the Dragon (1968), Z Cars (1968), Softly Softly (1970), Nicholas and Alexandra (1971), The Canterbury Tales (1972), The Vault of Horror (1973), The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973), The Mutations (1974), Piccadilly Circus (1977), Late Night Story (1978), The Book Tower (1979-81), The Curse of King Tut's Tomb (1980), The Hound of the Baskervilles (1982, as Sherlock Holmes), Jemima Shore Investigates (1983), Remington Steele (1984), Blackadder II (1986), Roland Rat: The Series (1986), The Kenny Everett Television Show (1986), The Life and Loves of a She-Devil (1986), The Silver Chair (1990), Selling Hitler (1991), The Law Lord (1992), Cluedo (1992), Backtime (1998), Max Bear (2000), Dungeons and Dragons (2000), Fun at the Funeral Parlour (2001), Strange (2003), Fort Boyard (2003), Swiss Toni (2003), The Magic Roundabout (2005), Agatha Christie's Marple (2007), The Beeps (2007-08) and The Genie in the Bottle (2010). Tom has also had regular roles as Prof Geoffrey Hoyt in Medics (1992-95), Professor Wyvern in Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased) (2000-01) and Donald MacDonald in Monarch of the Glen (2004-05). He is probably most famous in his latter career for providing the eccentric narration for sketch series Little Britain between 2003-08.
Facts
Tom left home at 15 to become a monk with the Brothers of Ploermel on Jersey, but abandoned this profession at the age of 21 in favour of National Service. In 1971 Tom was nominated for two Golden Globe Awards for his portrayal of Rasputin in Nicholas and Alexandra (he was beaten by Ben Johnson and Desi Arnaz Jr). In December 1980 he married actress Lalla Ward (who had been companion Romana in Doctor Who since 1979), but the marriage ended 18 months later. He married third wife Sue Jerrard in 1986, previously an assistant editor on Doctor Who. Tom's old drinking buddies in the 1960s and 70s included artist Francis Bacon at the infamous Colony Room. Tom has several links to popular music - appearing on Technocat's single Only Human (1995), and providing a monologue on Witness to a Murder (Part Two) by Mansun (1998 - his Doctor and the TARDIS also appeared on the cover of the band's album Six). Pop band The Human League released a song entitled Tom Baker in 1980. In 1999 Tom published a short fairytale novel called The Boy Who Kicked Pigs, which has since been adapted for the stage. Tom's distinctive vocals can also be heard at various tourist attractions in the UK, such as the London Dungeon, Natural History Museum and Alton Towers' Nemesis ride. In 2006 Tom recorded 11,593 phrases so his voice could be used for BT's text messaging service to raise money for homeless charity Shelter - as a result record producer Mark Murphy created a single of Tom "singing" You Really Got Me by the Kinks.

Louise Jameson (Leela) Born Apr 20 1951
Doctor Who credits
Played: Leela in The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang, Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers, Underworld, The Invasion of Time (1977-78). Return appearance in Dimensions in Time (1993)
Career highlights
Louise made her screen debut in a 1971 adaptation of Tom Brown's Schooldays, and then took roles in Cider with Rosie (1971), Disciple of Death (1972), Emmerdale Farm (1973), Space: 1999 (1975), The Peddler (1976), Dominic (1976), The Gentle Touch (1984), The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Age 13¾ (1985), The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole (1987), Molly (1994), Wycliffe (1995), The Upper Hand (1996), River City (2008), Doc Martin (2011), Holby City (2012) and The Tractate Middoth (2013). She has had a number of regular roles over the years, including Dr Anne Reynolds in The Omega Factor (1979), Blanche Simmons in Tenko (1981-82), Susan Young in Bergerac (1985-90), Janet in Rides (1992-93) and Rosa Di Marco in soap EastEnders (1998-2000).
Facts
Louise was persuaded to become an actress when she was working as a prison visitor and met Leslie Grantham, then serving 12 years for manslaughter but later to become famous as EastEnders' Den Watts (and who was also in Resurrection of the Daleks in 1984).

John Leeson (Voice of K-9) Born Mar 16 1943
Doctor Who credits
Played: Voice of K-9 in The Invisible Enemy (1977), The Sun Makers (1977), Underworld (1978), The Invasion of Time (1978), The Ribos Operation (1978), The Pirate Planet (1978), The Stones of Blood (1978), The Androids of Tara (1978), The Armageddon Factor (1979), The Leisure Hive (1980), Meglos (1980), Full Circle (1980), State of Decay (1980), Warriors' Gate (1981), The Five Doctors (1983), Dimensions in Time (1993), School Reunion (2006), Journey's End (2008).
John has also voiced K-9 in Doctor Who's spin-offs, including K9 & Company: A Girl's Best Friend (1981), The Sarah Jane Adventures stories Invasion of the Bane (2006), The Lost Boy (2007), the Comic Relief special From Raxacoricofallapatorius with Love (2009), The Mad Woman in the Attic (2009), The Wedding of Sarah Jane Smith (2009), Mona Lisa's Revenge (2009), The Gift (2009), The Nightmare Man (2010) and Goodbye, Sarah Jane Smith (2010), and the K9 TV series stories Regeneration, Liberation, The Korven The Bounty Hunter, Siren of Ceres, Fear Itself, The Fall of the House of Gryffen, Jaws of Orthrus, Dream-eaters, Curse of Anubis, Oroborus, Alien Avatar, Aeolian, The Last Oak Tree in England, Black Hunger, The Cambridge Spy, Lost Library of UKKO, Mutant Copper, The Custodians, Taphony and the Time Loop, Robot Gladiators, Mind Snap, Angel of the North, The Last Precinct, Hound of the Korven, Eclipse of the Korven (2009-10). John has also voiced K9 in Search Out Space (1991), the BBC1 animated audio Shada (2003), on various episodes of Blue Peter (1977/2006), The Weakest Link (2007), Comic Relief (2009), Pointless (2013) and Stargazing Live: Back to Earth (2013-14), as well as in Big Finish audios since 2003.
Played: Voice of the Nucleus of the Swarm in The Invisible Enemy (1977)
Played: Dugeen in The Power of Kroll (1978-79)
Played: Voice of the Dalek battle computer in Remembrance of the Daleks (1988)
Career highlights
John's acting career began with The Spanish Farm in 1968, followed by roles in Dad's Army (1969), My Wife Next Door (1972), Headmaster (1977), Jigsaw (1979), Tarka the Otter (1979), Blake's 7 (1978/79), Sorry! (1981), Tucker's Luck (1985), Whoops Apocalypse (1986), 'Allo 'Allo (1989), The Bill (1993), Bugs (1995), Vanity Fair (1998), Doctors (2001), ChuckleVision (2007) and Rebels Without a Clue (2009). He also voiced Bungle in 50 episodes of children's programme Rainbow in the 1970s.
Facts
In the 70s John was a question writer for quiz show Mastermind. He is also a good chef, having prepared period feasts for Agatha Christie's Poirot (1993), been a wine consultant to five-star restaurant staff, and was a serving magistrate in Ealing, and adviser on court etiquette and procedures to film and TV. In 2002 John stood (under his birth name of John Ducker) as a Liberal Democrat candidate in the Ealing Council elections for the Perivale constituency (he got 326 votes, finishing in last place unelected). He stood again in 2010, attracting 1,104 votes, finishing seventh out of nine. His wife is Judy Ducker, a property buyer on productions such as Hugo, Snow White and the Huntsman and Diana.

Richard Leech (Gatherer Hade) Nov 24 1922 to Mar 24 2004
Career highlights
Irish-born Richard's first credit was in The Temptress (1949), followed by Tygers Hart (1954), The Dam Busters (1955), The Iron Petticoat (1956), Curse of the Demon (1957), Ice Cold in Alex (1958), A Night to Remember (1958), Tunes of Glory (1960), The Terror of the Tongs (1961), Ricochet (1963), Ghost Squad (1963), Walk a Tightrope (1965), three episodes of The Avengers (1962/63/67), The Devil in the Fog (1968), The Gold Robbers (1969), The Doctors (1969), Special Branch (1973-74), The Gathering Storm (1974), Bill Brand (1976), The New Avengers (1976), Rooms (1977), Smiley's People (1982), Gandhi (1982), The Nation's Health (1983) and A Handful of Dust (1988).
Facts
The godfathers to his two daughters are Noel Coward and Alec Guinness. Before becoming an actor, Richard worked as a doctor with his own surgery in 1946; he wrote a column for the magazine World Medicine for 30 years. He also owned English vineyard Rocks Country Wines, and was an authority on Kipling. Richard, whose second wife was book editor and romance novelist Diane Pearson, became very deaf in his latter years, curtailing his acting.

Jonina Scott (Marn) Born Sep 24 1943
Career highlights
After debuting in Harriet's Back in Town (1973), Jonina other roles were in The Paradise Run (1976), Running Blind (1979) and The Onedin Line (1979). She then married actor David Ashton (who appeared in Timelash in 1985) and moved to Iceland, where she appeared in 101 Reykjavik (2000) and The Seagull's Laughter (2001) as Jonina Ólafsdóttir.

Roy Macready (Cordo) Born 1934
Career highlights
Roy debuted in Paul Temple (1970), and then took roles in The Mating Machine (1970), Fathers and Sons (1971), The Moonstone (1972), Clayhanger (1976), Pinocchio (1978), Flickers (1980), The Deceivers (1981), Bognor (1981), Janet and Company (1982), Britannia Hospital (1982), Rentaghost (1982), Luna (1983-84), Foxy Lady (1984), Alice in Wonderland (1986), So Haunt Me (1992), Harry's Mad (1993), The Upper Hand (1995), Madame Bovary (2000) and The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014).

Henry Woolf (The Collector) Born Jan 20 1930
Career highlights
Henry made his acting debut in Jacks and Knaves (1961), and then Stranger in the City (1962), A Home of Your Own (1964), Marat/ Sade (1967), Great Catherine (1968), The Lion in Winter (1968), The Bed Sitting Room (1969), Figures in a Landscape (1970), The Edwardians (1972), Full House (1972), Steptoe and Son Ride Again (1973), Skinflicker (1973), Rutland Weekend Television (1975-76), The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975), Joseph Andrews (1977), Sykes (1978), Superman III (1983), Gorky Park (1983), Prince Caspian and the Voyage of the Dawn Treader (1989), The Silver Chair (1990), Revenge of the Land (1999), Prairie Giant: The Tommy Douglas Story (2006) and Smallfilm (2007). He also hosted in the 1970s the children's TV series Words and Pictures, and was a lifelong friend of playwright Harold Pinter (who dedicated his play The Hothouse to him).
Facts
Henry moved to Canada in 1978, where he joined the staff of the University of Saskatchewan in 1983, and was eventually promoted to full professor in 1990. He also served as artistic director of the Shakespeare on the Saskatchewan Festival in Saskatoon between 1991-2001. In 1957 Henry directed the first production of Pinter's first play The Room and reprised the role of Mr Kidd for an anniversary production in 2007. In 2005, Henry said of his time in Doctor Who: "I put the heroine in a steamer and was generally a nasty so and so. I ended up disappearing down a plughole but I loved it because I had an electric chair. I told the BBC I had to have lots of rehearsal time for it so I spent the morning scooting about in my chair. That was fun."
In 2016 Toby Hadoke released his Who's Round interview with Henry here.

William Simons (Mandrel) Born Nov 17 1940
Career highlights
William debuted as a child actor in Ivory Hunter (1951), and later appeared in West of Zanzibar (1954), A Castle and Sixpence (1954), Rex Milligan (1956), Jo's Boys (1959), Francis Storm Investigates (1960), The Old Curiosity Shop (1962-63), Mr Rose (1968), Hadleigh (1971), The Guardians (1971), Coronation Street (1972), Wessex Tales (1973), Secret Army (1977), Parables (1978), Cribb (1980-81), Minder (1984), Juliet Bravo (1985), Late Starter (1985), Wish Me Luck (1989), A Bit of a Do (1989), The Woman in Black (1989), The Darling Buds of May (1992), Lovejoy (1992) and Haggard (1990-92). Between 1973-83 William played Martin O'Connor QC in Crown Court, and between 1990-94 he played Inspector Fox in the Inspector Alleyn Mysteries. However, his most indelible role is as the much-loved (PC) Alf Ventress in over 350 episodes of Heartbeat (1992-2009) and in its spin-off series The Royal (2003-04).
Facts
Since adolescence William suffered from severe acne, hence his famously pock-marked face, and in recent years has been patron of the Changing Faces charity, in aid of those with facial disfigurements.

Michael Keating (Goudry) Born Feb 10 1947
Career highlights
Michael's earliest credit was a 1969 episode of Special Branch, followed by roles in Doomwatch (1972), Yes, Minister (1981), Rainbow (1986), Capital City (1989), London's Burning (1990), Between the Lines (1993), Midsomer Murders (2009) and Micro Men (2009). He will forever be remembered as Vila Restal in the sci-fi show Blake's 7 (1978-81), the only character to appear in all 52 episodes. He has more recently enjoyed a recurring role as Reverend Stevens in soap EastEnders since 2005.
Facts
Michael's first job was as a mailing clerk for United Artists Film Corporation in London. One of his duties was to take telegrams to the Post Office in Soho, and it was during that period he took one to be sent to the US to announce that the Beatles were to make their first film, A Hard Day's Night!

Adrienne Burgess (Veet) Born Nov 20 1947
Career highlights
Australian Adrienne first appeared in Affairs of the Heart (1974), followed by roles in Space: 1999 (1975), Dickens of London (1976), Blake's 7 (1979), Priest of Love (1981), Cold Warrior (1984), Just Good Friends (1984), The Bill (1989) and The Yellow Wallpaper (1989).
Facts
In the 1990s Adrienne wrote a book on fatherhood and parenting, and has since become an international authority on the subject. Adrienne is currently policy advisor to Fathers Direct, the British information centre for fathers and also contributes to family policy in the Lord Chancellor's Department, the Cabinet Office and Number 10 Downing Street. She has, since the 1960s, been a jobbing journalist in both Australia and the UK. She is married to actor Martin Cochrane (who appeared in The Caves of Androzani in 1984).
In 2013 Toby Hadoke released his Who's Round interview with Adrienne and her husband Martin here.

Carole Hopkin (Nurse) Born Dec 1945
Career highlights
This is Carole's only acting credit. Carole is nowadays known as Carole Morgan-Hopkin, of the renowned Morgan-Hopkin artistic family from Wales (indeed her sister Mary Hopkin is the singer of Those Were the Days fame, making Mary's husband - famous music producer Tony Visconti - Carole's brother in law. Carole also used to be Mary's manager in the 1960s). Watercolourist Carole has lived and exhibited in London and the United States, and has featured in American Vogue. She is also an interior designer, having designed a lounge for fashion designer Oscar de la Renta and a Japanese garden for Beatle George Harrison (Carole and her sister Mary are lifelong friends of the Beatles, the latter having toured with them in the 1960s, with Carole as chaperone). Carole is also one of the backing vocalists on the Beatles classic Hey Jude (along with Mary and Yoko Ono).

David Rowlands (Bisham) Born 1944
Career highlights
Welshman David debuted in The Wars of the Roses (1965), followed by Mr Aitch (1967), The Dickie Henderson Show (1968), Counterstrike (1969), Elephant's Eggs in a Rhubarb Tree (1971), On the Buses (1971), Bless This House (1972), Sir Yellow (1973), The Regiment (1973), Rising Damp (1975), The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin (1977), Pennies from Heaven (1978), The Two Ronnies (1976-80), The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy (1981), Bognor (1981), Metal Mickey (1981), The Cleopatras (1983), Blott on the Landscape (1985) and 'Allo 'Allo! (1992).
Facts
Qualified teacher David also worked as a reporter for BBC Radio Sussex.

Colin McCormack (Commander) Dec 2 1941 to Jun 19 2004 (cancer)
Career highlights
Debuting in Trial (1971), Colin's CV also includes work on General Hospital (1972), Thriller (1973), Dixon of Dock Green (1974), Quiller (1975), Rooms (1977), Out (1978), The Spoils of War (1980), Kelly Monteith (1981-82), Yes, Minister (1981), Chocky (1984), The Chief (1990), EastEnders (1991), A Touch of Frost (1992), Spender (1993), First Knight (1995), The Knock (1994/97) and Longitude (2000).
Facts
Colin was married to actress and movement specialist Wendy Alnutt. Colin also tutored at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, and his students included Ewan McGregor, Joseph Fiennes and Daniel Craig. His children are Katherine McCormack (a publicist on various blockbuster films) and musician Andrew McCormack.

Tom Kelly (Guard)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Guard in The Face of Evil (1977), The Sun Makers (1977)
Played: Vardan in The Invasion of Time (1978)
Career highlights
Debuting in Angels (1976), Tom's other credits include Blake's 7 (1978), The Lost Boys (1978), Julius Caesar (1979), Agony (1981), Chintz (1981), Shine on Harvey Moon (1984), The Green Man (1990) and The Bill (1992). He may be remembered by cult TV fans as the soldier Sam Pearce in the railway station adventure of Sapphire and Steel (1979).
In 2016 Toby Hadoke released his Who's Round interview with Tom here.

Derek Crewe (Synge) Jun 6 1945 to May 16 2011
Career highlights
Derek's first role was as regular Lefty in The Tomorrow People (1973), after which he appeared in The Fortunes of Nigel (1974), Z Cars (1975), Oil Strike North (1975), Secret Army (1979), All Creatures Great and Small (1980), The Citadel (1983), We Are Seven (1989/91), Archer's Goon (1992), All Quiet on the Preston Front (1995), Picking Up the Pieces (1998), Holby City (2003) and Grass (2003).
Facts
In the 1960s Derek was in a group called Roy and the Renegades which frequented the same venues in Liverpool as the Beatles (and it seems he was a very much loved member of his community in Llay, Wrexham - see this tribute page for evidence). In the late 1980s he appeared in a memorable TV commercial in the UK for Trebor Extra Strong Mints.

CREW

Robert Holmes (writer and script editor) Apr 2 1926 to May 24 1986 (chronic liver ailment)
Doctor Who credits
Wrote: The Krotons (1968-69), The Space Pirates (1969), Spearhead from Space (1970), Terror of the Autons (1971), Carnival of Monsters (1973), The Time Warrior (1973-74), The Ark in Space (1975), Pyramids of Mars (1975, uncredited), The Brain of Morbius (1976, uncredited), The Deadly Assassin (1976), The Talons of Weng-Chiang (1977), The Sun Makers (1977), The Ribos Operation (1978), The Power of Kroll (1978-79), The Caves of Androzani (1984), The Two Doctors (1985), The Trial of a Time Lord (1986)
Script edited: Robot, The Ark in Space (uncredited), The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, Planet of Evil, Pyramids of Mars, The Android Invasion, The Brain of Morbius, The Seeds of Doom, The Masque of Mandragora, The Hand of Fear, The Deadly Assassin (uncredited), The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang (uncredited), Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers (uncredited) (1974-78)
Career highlights
He began writing for TV as early as Knight Errant Limited (1960), and went on to write scripts for Deadline Midnight (1961), Ghost Squad (1962), Emergency Ward 10 (1962-63), Dr Finlay's Casebook (1964-65), Undermind (1965), No Hiding Place (1965-67), Public Eye (1965-68), Mr Rose (1967-68), Doomwatch (1971), Spyder's Web (1972), Dixon of Dock Green (1974), Jukes of Piccadilly (1980), The Nightmare Man (1981), Blake's 7 (1979/81), Into the Labyrinth (1981-82) and Bergerac (1983-87). He was also story editor on Armchair Thriller and Shoestring, both in 1980.
Facts
Robert was the youngest ever commissioned officer in the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, serving in Burma. After he left the Army he joined the police, then became a journalist and sports writer - he was the last ever editor of British lifestyle publication John Bull Magazine in 1964. He was originally going to write Doctor Who's 20th anniversary tale in 1983, but when he found the numerous elements he'd been asked to incorporate unworkable, he was replaced by Terrance Dicks. Robert died while writing the final two episodes of The Trial of a Time Lord, and due to tensions in the Doctor Who production office at the time, his original ending for the story had to be changed and written afresh by Pip and Jane Baker. His face was also one of those seen during the Time Lord mind battle in The Brain of Morbius.

Pennant Roberts (director) Dec 15 1940 to Jun 22 2010 (cancer)
Doctor Who credits
Directed: The Face of Evil (1977), The Sun Makers (1977), The Pirate Planet (1978), Shada (1980, unfinished), Warriors of the Deep (1984), Timelash (1985)
Career highlights
Pennant's directing career began with Doomwatch in 1972, followed by work on The Regiment (1973), Sutherland's Law (1974), Oil Strike North (1975), Survivors (1975-76), Blake's 7 (1978), The Onedin Line (1979), Juliet Bravo (1980), Tenko (1981), Cold Warriors (1984), Howards' Way (1985), The Snow Spider (1988, for which he was nominated for a BAFTA for Best Children's Drama), The Bubblegum Brigade (1989), Emlyn's Moon (1990), The Chestnut Soldier (1991), Crime Story (1992), Wycliffe (1993) and The Sherman Plays (1993-97). He also acted as producer on a handful of these latter series.
Facts
Pennant was also chairman of the Directors' and Producers' Rights Society (now Directors UK), vice-president of the Strasbourg European Film Forum, chair of Media Skills Wales, a governor of the Welsh College of Music and Drama, and a board member of Sgrîn, the Welsh audiovisual media agency. He campaigned for many years for the rights of actors and directors to receive fees when programmes are repeated on television.

Graham Williams (producer) May 24 1945 to Aug 17 1990 (shooting incident)
Doctor Who credits
Produced: Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers, Underworld, The Invasion of Time, The Ribos Operation, The Pirate Planet, The Stones of Blood, The Androids of Tara, The Power of Kroll, The Armageddon Factor, Destiny of the Daleks, City of Death, The Creature from the Pit, Nightmare of Eden, The Horns of Nimon, Shada (unbroadcast) (1977-80)
Wrote: The Invasion of Time (1978, as David Agnew), City of Death (1979, as David Agnew)
Career highlights
Graham wrote for Target (1977), was script editor on The View from Daniel Pike (1971-73), Sutherland's Law (1973), Barlow at Large (1975) and Z Cars (1975-77), and produced Super Gran (1986-87).
Facts
In 1985 Graham helped design the text computer game Doctor Who and the Warlord. In 1986 Graham pitched a script for Doctor Who's 23rd season, The Nightmare Fair, but when the programme was put on hiatus for 18 months, he eventually wrote the story as a novel in 1989. It was adapted as an audio adventure featuring Colin Baker and Nicola Bryant in 2009. At the time of his death Graham was running the Hartnoll Hotel in Tiverton, Devon. It is commonly believed that Graham may have accidentally shot himself while cleaning his firearm, although there is another, unsubstantiated, rumour that he may have committed suicide.

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