Monday, July 21, 2014

Image of the Fendahl

The mesmerising Fendahl (played by
the equally as mesmerising
Wanda Ventham)
Four episodes (Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four)
First broadcast Oct 29 to Nov 19 1977
Average audience for serial: 7.80m

CAST

Tom Baker (The Doctor) Born Jan 20 1934
Doctor Who credits
Played: The Doctor in Robot, The Ark in Space, The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, Planet of Evil, Pyramids of Mars, The Android Invasion, The Brain of Morbius, The Seeds of Doom, The Masque of Mandragora, The Hand of Fear, The Deadly Assassin, The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang, Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers, Underworld, The Invasion of Time, The Ribos Operation, The Pirate Planet, The Stones of Blood, The Androids of Tara, The Power of Kroll, The Armageddon Factor, Destiny of the Daleks, City of Death, The Creature from the Pit, Nightmare of Eden, The Horns of Nimon, Shada (unbroadcast), The Leisure Hive, Meglos, Full Circle, State of Decay, Warriors' Gate, The Keeper of Traken, Logopolis (1974-81). Return appearances in The Five Doctors (1983, archive footage), Dimensions in Time (1993), The Day of the Doctor (2013, as The Curator - but I think we all know who he was really!).
Tom also played the Doctor in the 1975 audio story Doctor Who and the Pescatons, and in several BBC and Big Finish audios since 2009.
Played: Meglos in Meglos (1980)
Career highlights
Tom's career began with a 1968 adaptation of The Winter's Tale, followed by roles in George and the Dragon (1968), Z Cars (1968), Softly Softly (1970), Nicholas and Alexandra (1971), The Canterbury Tales (1972), The Vault of Horror (1973), The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973), The Mutations (1974), Piccadilly Circus (1977), Late Night Story (1978), The Book Tower (1979-81), The Curse of King Tut's Tomb (1980), The Hound of the Baskervilles (1982, as Sherlock Holmes), Jemima Shore Investigates (1983), Remington Steele (1984), Blackadder II (1986), Roland Rat: The Series (1986), The Kenny Everett Television Show (1986), The Life and Loves of a She-Devil (1986), The Silver Chair (1990), Selling Hitler (1991), The Law Lord (1992), Cluedo (1992), Backtime (1998), Max Bear (2000), Dungeons and Dragons (2000), Fun at the Funeral Parlour (2001), Strange (2003), Fort Boyard (2003), Swiss Toni (2003), The Magic Roundabout (2005), Agatha Christie's Marple (2007), The Beeps (2007-08) and The Genie in the Bottle (2010). Tom has also had regular roles as Prof Geoffrey Hoyt in Medics (1992-95), Professor Wyvern in Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased) (2000-01) and Donald MacDonald in Monarch of the Glen (2004-05). He is probably most famous in his latter career for providing the eccentric narration for sketch series Little Britain between 2003-08.
Facts
Tom left home at 15 to become a monk with the Brothers of Ploermel on Jersey, but abandoned this profession at the age of 21 in favour of National Service. In 1971 Tom was nominated for two Golden Globe Awards for his portrayal of Rasputin in Nicholas and Alexandra (he was beaten by Ben Johnson and Desi Arnaz Jr). In December 1980 he married actress Lalla Ward (who had been companion Romana in Doctor Who since 1979), but the marriage ended 18 months later. He married third wife Sue Jerrard in 1986, previously an assistant editor on Doctor Who. Tom's old drinking buddies in the 1960s and 70s included artist Francis Bacon at the infamous Colony Room. Tom has several links to popular music - appearing on Technocat's single Only Human (1995), and providing a monologue on Witness to a Murder (Part Two) by Mansun (1998 - his Doctor and the TARDIS also appeared on the cover of the band's album Six). Pop band The Human League released a song entitled Tom Baker in 1980. In 1999 Tom published a short fairytale novel called The Boy Who Kicked Pigs, which has since been adapted for the stage. Tom's distinctive vocals can also be heard at various tourist attractions in the UK, such as the London Dungeon, Natural History Museum and Alton Towers' Nemesis ride. In 2006 Tom recorded 11,593 phrases so his voice could be used for BT's text messaging service to raise money for homeless charity Shelter - as a result record producer Mark Murphy created a single of Tom "singing" You Really Got Me by the Kinks.

Louise Jameson (Leela) Born Apr 20 1951
Doctor Who credits
Played: Leela in The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang, Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers, Underworld, The Invasion of Time (1977-78). Return appearance in Dimensions in Time (1993)
Career highlights
Louise made her screen debut in a 1971 adaptation of Tom Brown's Schooldays, and then took roles in Cider with Rosie (1971), Disciple of Death (1972), Emmerdale Farm (1973), Space: 1999 (1975), The Peddler (1976), Dominic (1976), The Gentle Touch (1984), The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Age 13¾ (1985), The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole (1987), Molly (1994), Wycliffe (1995), The Upper Hand (1996), River City (2008), Doc Martin (2011), Holby City (2012) and The Tractate Middoth (2013). She has had a number of regular roles over the years, including Dr Anne Reynolds in The Omega Factor (1979), Blanche Simmons in Tenko (1981-82), Susan Young in Bergerac (1985-90), Janet in Rides (1992-93) and Rosa Di Marco in soap EastEnders (1998-2000).
Facts
Louise was persuaded to become an actress when she was working as a prison visitor and met Leslie Grantham, then serving 12 years for manslaughter but later to become famous as EastEnders' Den Watts (and who was also in Resurrection of the Daleks in 1984).

Wanda Ventham (Thea Ransome) Born Aug 5 1935
Doctor Who credits
Played: Jean Rock in The Faceless Ones (1967)
Played: Thea Ransome in Image of the Fendahl (1977)
Played: Faroon in Time and the Rani (1987)
Career highlights
Wanda is a stalwart of British TV and film, first appearing in 1956's Teenage Bad Girl. Over her long career she popped up in The Navy Lark (1959), Carry On Cleo (1964), Hit and Run (1965), The Likely Lads (1965), The Avengers (1965), Death is a Woman (1966), The Prisoner (1967), Carry On Up the Khyber (1968), The Blood Beast Terror (1968), A Family at War (1970-71), The Troubleshooters (1967-71), Captain Kronos - Vampire Hunter (1974), Rutland Weekend Television (1975), Emmerdale Farm (1976), Fallen Hero (1978-79), The Two Ronnies (1980), Union Castle (1982), Don't Wait Up (1987), Executive Stress (1986-87), Capstick's Law (1989), Only Fools and Horses (1989-92, as Rodney's mother-in-law (coincidentally, her husband in this is played by Denis Lill, who she plays against in Image of the Fendahl)), Next of Kin (1995-96), Heartbeat (1996-97), Hetty Wainthropp Investigates (1998), Coupling (2001), Oscar Charlie (2001-02), Mrs Caldicott's Cabbage War (2002), Lewis (2007), Run for Your Wife (2012), Sherlock (2013, as Sherlock's mum - which she is, of course!), Holby City (2014) and Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie (2016). She regularly played Shirley in The Rag Trade (1962-63), Virginia Lake in UFO (1970-73) and Ann Shepherd in The Lotus Eaters (1972-73).
Facts
Wanda's son is actor Benedict Cumberbatch (best known for Sherlock), and her husband actor Timothy Carlton. Wanda is a collector of barn owl memorabilia.

Daphne Heard (Martha Tyler) Aug 1 1904 to Jun 22 1983
Career highlights
Daphne's earliest acting credit is for Miranda (1949), followed by roles in The Castiglioni Brothers (1958), Lorna Doone (1963), Esther Waters (1964), Undermind (1965), The Witness (1966), The Woman in White (1966), Softly Softly (1967), Nearest and Dearest (1968), The First Churchills (1969), Wild, Wild Women (1969), Goodbye Gemini (1970), For the Love of Ada (1971), Upstairs Downstairs (1972), The Jensen Code (1973), Village Hall (1975), Angels (1976), Hazell (1978), Coronation Street (1978), Don't Forget to Write! (1977-79), Nanny (1981) and A Cotswold Death (1982). She had a regular role as Mrs Polouvicka ("Mrs Pooh") in the sitcom To the Manor Born between 1979-81. From its inception in 1977 until her death Daphne played the part of Maud the eccentric housekeeper in the Hinge and Bracket radio series.

Scott Fredericks (Maximillian Stael)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Boaz in Day of the Daleks (1972)
Played: Maximillian Stael in Image of the Fendahl (1977)
Career highlights
Scott's earliest role was in The White Rabbit (1967), followed by Strange Report (1969), Dixon of Dock Green (1970), Dad's Army (1971), Crossroads (1973), Sutherland's Law (1973), The Deadly Females (1976), Last of Summer (1978), Blake's 7 (1979), Cribb (1981), Cal (1984), Charters and Caldicott (1985), Prince William (2002), Sherlock Holmes and the Baker Street Irregulars (2007) and Rock Rivals (2008). Scott also had a regular role as Tom Kelly in the shipping soap Triangle (1983).
Facts
He is now a radio producer and director in Ireland. In a 2001 interview, Scott said: "I remember Peter Barkworth saying, 'My life with the BBC didn't start until I did Doctor Who'. And the same happened to me."

Denis Lill (Dr Fendelman) Born Apr 22 1942
Doctor Who credits
Played: Dr Fendelman in Image of the Fendahl (1977)
Played: Sir George Hutchinson in The Awakening (1984)
Career highlights
New Zealand born Denis's earliest acting credit was for Crime of Passion (1970), and he has since appeared in a great many productions, including Dead of Night (1972), The Train Now Standing (1972), Warship (1973), Moody and Pegg (1974), The Gathering Storm (1974), The Main Chance (1975), The Haunting of Julia (1977), Lillie (1978), The Professionals (1980), Bergerac (1984), Jenny's War (1985), Mapp and Lucia (1985-86), Blackadder the Third (1987), Gentlemen and Players (1988), Batman (1989), Waterfront Beat (1990-91), Bernard and the Genie (1991), The 10 Percenters (1993), Red Dwarf (1993), Outside Edge (1994), The Upper Hand (1996), Evita (1996), Where the Heart Is (2002), Bertie and Elizabeth (2002) and 24: Live Another Day (2014). He has had regular roles as Alfred Slingsby in The Regiment (1972-73), Charles Vaughan in Survivors (1975-77), Mr Bernard in Rumpole of the Bailey (1983-92), Cassandra's dad Alan Parry in Only Fools and Horses (1989-92) and Mr Rose in The Royal (2003-09/11).

Edward Evans (Ted Moss) Jun 4 1914 to Dec 20 2001
Career highlights
Edward's earliest role was in Dulcimer Street (1948), and then Holiday Week (1952), Valley of Song (1953), The Angel Who Pawned Her Harp (1956), William Tell (1959), The Trials of Oscar Wilde (1960), Maigret (1961), The River Flows East (1962), The Human Jungle (1963), Coronation Street (1965-66, as Lionel Petty), Man in a Suitcase (1968), The Tyrant King (1968), Steptoe and Son (1970), Out of the Unknown (1971), Tales from the Crypt (1972), The Gathering Storm (1974), Poldark (1975), George and Mildred (1977), Suez 1956 (1979), Lifeforce (1985) and Heart of the Country (1987). His most high profile role was as Bob Grove in the first British soap opera for adults The Grove Family (1954-57), written by Jon Pertwee's brother Michael and father Roland, as well as in the film version It's a Great Day (1955). His son in the soap was Peter Bryant, who went on to produce Doctor Who in the late 1960s.

Edward Arthur (Adam Colby)
Career highlights
Edward's first credit is Twelfth Night (1969), and he later appeared in Love Among the Ruins (1975), Secret Army (1978), Pride and Prejudice (1980), Moonlighting (1982), Morons from Outer Space (1985), Lovejoy (1991), Harry Enfield's Television Programme (1992), EastEnders (1996), Beyond Fear (1997) and Mosley (1998).
Facts
Edward now lives in Spain.

Derek Martin (David Mitchell) Apr 11 1933
Doctor Who credits
Played: Extra in The Romans (1965, uncredited)
Played: Parisian in The Massacre of St Bartolomew's Eve (1966, uncredited)
Played: Soldier in The Web of Fear (1968, uncredited), Spearhead from Space (1970, uncredited), Inferno (1970, uncredited), The Claws of Axos (1971, uncredited)
Played: Thug in The Ambassadors of Death (1970, uncredited)
Played: Prisoner in The Mind of Evil (1971, uncredited)
Played: David Mitchell in Image of the Fendahl (1977)
Career highlights
Stuntman Derek's long career began in 1964 with Rupert of Hentzau, and then Secrets of a Windmill Girl (1966), Adam Adamant Lives! (1966), The Borderers (1969), Jackanory (1970), Paul Temple (1970-71), The Sex Thief (1973), Doctor on the Go (1975), Survivors (1977), Adventures of a Plumber's Mate (1978), Law and Order (1978), Potter (1979), The Gentle Touch (1980), Pig in the Middle (1980-83), The Chinese Detective (1981), Hart to Hart (1983), Minder (1984), King and Castle (1986-88), Only Fools and Horses (1993), Eldorado (1993) and The Detectives (1997). Derek will be most recognised as Charlie Slater in soap EastEnders (2000-11/13). Derek started his career as a stuntman but after breaking his collar bone filming Elizabeth R in 1971, he switched to acting. In 1982 he became the second actor to take on the role of R D Wingfield's Detective Inspector Jack Frost when he appeared in the BBC Radio 4 play A Touch of Frost.
Facts
Derek admitted on a 2011 edition of Celebrity Mastermind that when he worked at Smithfield Fish Market in London as a porter in 1961 he stole £10,000 worth of fish, for which he stood trial at the Old Bailey and was acquitted. In the 1960s Derek also hid forearms for the notorious gangsters the Kray twins.
In 2015 Toby Hadoke released his Who's Round interview with Derek, along with stuntmen Royston Farrell and Roy Scammell, here.

Graham Simpson (Hiker) Born Jul 27 1946
Career highlights
Debuted in The Regiment (1972), and then Z Cars (1972), Warship (1973), Rogues' Rock (1974-76), Blake's 7 (1979), The Bitch (1979) and Shoestring (1980).

Geoffrey Hinsliff (Jack Tyler) Born 1937
Doctor Who credits
Played: Jack Tyler in Image of the Fendahl (1977)
Played: Fisk in Nightmare of Eden (1979)
Career highlights
Geoffrey's earliest role was in Suspense (1963), later taking roles in Cluff (1965), Adam Adamant Lives! (1966), A Family at War (1970), The Dragon's Opponent (1973), Couples (1976), Striker (1975-76), I, Claudius (1976), Accident (1978), Angels (1983), First Among Equals (1986), CATS Eyes (1987), Hetty Wainthropp Investigates (1998) and Heartbeat (2003). He will forever be remembered for his regular roles as George Fairchild in the comedy drama Brass (1983-84) and especially as Don Brennan in soap Coronation Street (1987-97).

CREW

Chris Boucher (writer) Born 1943
Doctor Who credits
Wrote: The Face of Evil (1977), The Robots of Death (1977), Image of the Fendahl (1977)
Career highlights
Chris started out as a satirical and comedy sketch writer for the likes of Braden's Week (1968) and The Saturday Crowd (1969), later writing for Dave Allen At Large (1971), Romany Jones (1973), That's Life! (1973), Shoestring (1980), Juliet Bravo (1982), Home James! (1987) and The Bill (1990). Chris also played a major role in developing drama in the late 1970s and 80s, becoming script editor and occasional writer on Blake's 7 (1978-81), script editor of Bergerac (1981), and series deviser of Star Cops (1987). In more recent years Chris has written novels and audio dramas based upon the worlds he created in Blake's 7 and Doctor Who.

George Spenton-Foster (director)
Doctor Who credits
Directed: Image of the Fendahl (1977), The Ribos Operation (1978)
Career highlights
After starting out as a call boy on The Quatermass Experiment in 1953, George's directing CV begins with Dr Finlay's Casebook in 1963, and also includes Londoners (1965), Out of the Unknown (1965/66), Paul Temple (1971), The Brothers (1972), Survivors (1977), Blake's 7 (1979) and Cribb (1981). George also acted as associate producer on the sci-fi anthology series Out of the Unknown between 1965-67, and produced Boy Meets Girl (1967), Thirty-Minute Theatre (1967-68) and The Link Men (1970).
Facts
It is believed George has died, thought to be through alcoholism.

Graham Williams (producer) May 24 1945 to Aug 17 1990 (shooting incident)
Doctor Who credits
Produced: Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers, Underworld, The Invasion of Time, The Ribos Operation, The Pirate Planet, The Stones of Blood, The Androids of Tara, The Power of Kroll, The Armageddon Factor, Destiny of the Daleks, City of Death, The Creature from the Pit, Nightmare of Eden, The Horns of Nimon, Shada (unbroadcast) (1977-80)
Wrote: The Invasion of Time (1978, as David Agnew), City of Death (1979, as David Agnew)
Career highlights
Graham wrote for Target (1977), was script editor on The View from Daniel Pike (1971-73), Sutherland's Law (1973), Barlow at Large (1975) and Z Cars (1975-77), and produced Super Gran (1986-87).
Facts
In 1985 Graham helped design the text computer game Doctor Who and the Warlord. In 1986 Graham pitched a script for Doctor Who's 23rd season, The Nightmare Fair, but when the programme was put on hiatus for 18 months, he eventually wrote the story as a novel in 1989. It was adapted as an audio adventure featuring Colin Baker and Nicola Bryant in 2009. At the time of his death Graham was running the Hartnoll Hotel in Tiverton, Devon. It is commonly believed that Graham may have accidentally shot himself while cleaning his firearm, although there is another, unsubstantiated, rumour that he may have committed suicide.

Robert Holmes (script editor) Apr 2 1926 to May 24 1986 (chronic liver ailment)
Doctor Who credits
Wrote: The Krotons (1968-69), The Space Pirates (1969), Spearhead from Space (1970), Terror of the Autons (1971), Carnival of Monsters (1973), The Time Warrior (1973-74), The Ark in Space (1975), Pyramids of Mars (1975, uncredited), The Brain of Morbius (1976, uncredited), The Deadly Assassin (1976), The Talons of Weng-Chiang (1977), The Sun Makers (1977), The Ribos Operation (1978), The Power of Kroll (1978-79), The Caves of Androzani (1984), The Two Doctors (1985), The Trial of a Time Lord (1986)
Script edited: Robot, The Ark in Space (uncredited), The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, Planet of Evil, Pyramids of Mars, The Android Invasion, The Brain of Morbius, The Seeds of Doom, The Masque of Mandragora, The Hand of Fear, The Deadly Assassin (uncredited), The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang (uncredited), Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers (uncredited) (1974-78)
Career highlights
He began writing for TV as early as Knight Errant Limited (1960), and went on to write scripts for Deadline Midnight (1961), Ghost Squad (1962), Emergency Ward 10 (1962-63), Dr Finlay's Casebook (1964-65), Undermind (1965), No Hiding Place (1965-67), Public Eye (1965-68), Mr Rose (1967-68), Doomwatch (1971), Spyder's Web (1972), Dixon of Dock Green (1974), Jukes of Piccadilly (1980), The Nightmare Man (1981), Blake's 7 (1979/81), Into the Labyrinth (1981-82) and Bergerac (1983-87). He was also story editor on Armchair Thriller and Shoestring, both in 1980.
Facts
Robert was the youngest ever commissioned officer in the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, serving in Burma. After he left the Army he joined the police, then became a journalist and sports writer - he was the last ever editor of British lifestyle publication John Bull Magazine in 1964. He was originally going to write Doctor Who's 20th anniversary tale in 1983, but when he found the numerous elements he'd been asked to incorporate unworkable, he was replaced by Terrance Dicks. Robert died while writing the final two episodes of The Trial of a Time Lord, and due to tensions in the Doctor Who production office at the time, his original ending for the story had to be changed and written afresh by Pip and Jane Baker. His face was also one of those seen during the Time Lord mind battle in The Brain of Morbius.

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