Friday, July 18, 2014

Horror of Fang Rock

Adelaide (Annette Woollett) clings
to Lord Skinsale (Alan Rowe)
for dear life
Four episodes (Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four)
First broadcast Sep 3 to 24 1977
Average audience for serial: 8.40m

CAST

Tom Baker (The Doctor) Born Jan 20 1934
Doctor Who credits
Played: The Doctor in Robot, The Ark in Space, The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, Planet of Evil, Pyramids of Mars, The Android Invasion, The Brain of Morbius, The Seeds of Doom, The Masque of Mandragora, The Hand of Fear, The Deadly Assassin, The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang, Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers, Underworld, The Invasion of Time, The Ribos Operation, The Pirate Planet, The Stones of Blood, The Androids of Tara, The Power of Kroll, The Armageddon Factor, Destiny of the Daleks, City of Death, The Creature from the Pit, Nightmare of Eden, The Horns of Nimon, Shada (unbroadcast), The Leisure Hive, Meglos, Full Circle, State of Decay, Warriors' Gate, The Keeper of Traken, Logopolis (1974-81). Return appearances in The Five Doctors (1983, archive footage), Dimensions in Time (1993), The Day of the Doctor (2013, as The Curator - but I think we all know who he was really!).
Tom also played the Doctor in the 1975 audio story Doctor Who and the Pescatons, and in several BBC and Big Finish audios since 2009.
Played: Meglos in Meglos (1980)
Career highlights
Tom's career began with a 1968 adaptation of The Winter's Tale, followed by roles in George and the Dragon (1968), Z Cars (1968), Softly Softly (1970), Nicholas and Alexandra (1971), The Canterbury Tales (1972), The Vault of Horror (1973), The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973), The Mutations (1974), Piccadilly Circus (1977), Late Night Story (1978), The Book Tower (1979-81), The Curse of King Tut's Tomb (1980), The Hound of the Baskervilles (1982, as Sherlock Holmes), Jemima Shore Investigates (1983), Remington Steele (1984), Blackadder II (1986), Roland Rat: The Series (1986), The Kenny Everett Television Show (1986), The Life and Loves of a She-Devil (1986), The Silver Chair (1990), Selling Hitler (1991), The Law Lord (1992), Cluedo (1992), Backtime (1998), Max Bear (2000), Dungeons and Dragons (2000), Fun at the Funeral Parlour (2001), Strange (2003), Fort Boyard (2003), Swiss Toni (2003), The Magic Roundabout (2005), Agatha Christie's Marple (2007), The Beeps (2007-08) and The Genie in the Bottle (2010). Tom has also had regular roles as Prof Geoffrey Hoyt in Medics (1992-95), Professor Wyvern in Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased) (2000-01) and Donald MacDonald in Monarch of the Glen (2004-05). He is probably most famous in his latter career for providing the eccentric narration for sketch series Little Britain between 2003-08.
Facts
Tom left home at 15 to become a monk with the Brothers of Ploermel on Jersey, but abandoned this profession at the age of 21 in favour of National Service. In 1971 Tom was nominated for two Golden Globe Awards for his portrayal of Rasputin in Nicholas and Alexandra (he was beaten by Ben Johnson and Desi Arnaz Jr). In December 1980 he married actress Lalla Ward (who had been companion Romana in Doctor Who since 1979), but the marriage ended 18 months later. He married third wife Sue Jerrard in 1986, previously an assistant editor on Doctor Who. Tom's old drinking buddies in the 1960s and 70s included artist Francis Bacon at the infamous Colony Room. Tom has several links to popular music - appearing on Technocat's single Only Human (1995), and providing a monologue on Witness to a Murder (Part Two) by Mansun (1998 - his Doctor and the TARDIS also appeared on the cover of the band's album Six). Pop band The Human League released a song entitled Tom Baker in 1980. In 1999 Tom published a short fairytale novel called The Boy Who Kicked Pigs, which has since been adapted for the stage. Tom's distinctive vocals can also be heard at various tourist attractions in the UK, such as the London Dungeon, Natural History Museum and Alton Towers' Nemesis ride. In 2006 Tom recorded 11,593 phrases so his voice could be used for BT's text messaging service to raise money for homeless charity Shelter - as a result record producer Mark Murphy created a single of Tom "singing" You Really Got Me by the Kinks.

Louise Jameson (Leela) Born Apr 20 1951
Doctor Who credits
Played: Leela in The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang, Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers, Underworld, The Invasion of Time (1977-78). Return appearance in Dimensions in Time (1993)
Career highlights
Louise made her screen debut in a 1971 adaptation of Tom Brown's Schooldays, and then took roles in Cider with Rosie (1971), Disciple of Death (1972), Emmerdale Farm (1973), Space: 1999 (1975), The Peddler (1976), Dominic (1976), The Gentle Touch (1984), The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Age 13¾ (1985), The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole (1987), Molly (1994), Wycliffe (1995), The Upper Hand (1996), River City (2008), Doc Martin (2011), Holby City (2012) and The Tractate Middoth (2013). She has had a number of regular roles over the years, including Dr Anne Reynolds in The Omega Factor (1979), Blanche Simmons in Tenko (1981-82), Susan Young in Bergerac (1985-90), Janet in Rides (1992-93) and Rosa Di Marco in soap EastEnders (1998-2000).
Facts
Louise was persuaded to become an actress when she was working as a prison visitor and met Leslie Grantham, then serving 12 years for manslaughter but later to become famous as EastEnders' Den Watts (and who was also in Resurrection of the Daleks in 1984).

Colin Douglas (Reuben/ Rutan voice) Jul 28 1912 to Dec 21 1991 (heart failure)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Donald Bruce in The Enemy of the World (1967-68)
Played: Reuben/ Rutan voice in Horror of Fang Rock (1977)
Career highlights
Colin's earliest credit was Dick Barton: Special Agent (1948) and later appeared in The Six Proud Walkers (1954), The Children of the New Forest (1955 and 1964), The Count of Monte Cristo (1956), Treasure Island (1957), The Black Arrow (1958), Invisible Man (1959), Emergency Ward 10 (1959), The Splendid Spur (1960), Benny Hill (1962), Bonehead (1960-62), Danger Man (1965), Softly Softly (1966), Quick Before They Catch Us (1966), The Railway Children (1968), Follyfoot (1972), Rooms (1975), The Sweeney (1975), Bill Brand (1976), The Flockton Flyer (1978), Telford's Change (1979), The Good Companions (1980-81), Nanny (1981-83, as Donald Gray), Highway (1983), The Pickwick Papers (1985), Ex (1991) and GBH (1991). He played Edwin Ashton in over 40 episodes of A Family at War (1970-72).
Facts
In the late 1920s Colin worked as a sheep farmer and a lumberjack while in New Zealand. During World War Two he took part in the Allied invasion of Sicily (Operation Husky) in 1943, and spent two days waiting to be rescued from the sea after his glider released too early. He also took part in 1944's Operation Market Garden, the unsuccessful Allied attempt to enter Germany via the Netherlands over the Rhine. Colin had five children with actress wife Gina Cachia, but their daughter Amanda was tragically killed in a traffic accident at the age of 20 at the University of Kent's Canterbury campus.

John Abbott (Vince Hawkins) Born Apr 19 1945
Career highlights
John made his debut in Timeslip (1970), followed by roles in Special Branch (1973), Moody and Pegg (1975), Grange Hill (1978), Angels (1979), Bergerac (1985), Slinger's Day (1986), Moondial (1988), Spatz (1990), Soldier Soldier (1991), Kappatoo (1990-92), Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994), The Young Poisoner's Handbook (1995), Bottom (1995), Trial and Retribution (1997-98) and Wycliffe (1998).

Ralph Watson (Ben) Born Jan 20 1936
Doctor Who credits
Played: Technician in The Underwater Menace (1967)
Played: Captain Knight in The Web of Fear (1968)
Played: Ettis in The Monster of Peladon (1974)
Played: Ben in Horror of Fang Rock (1977)
Career highlights
His first credit was Front Page Story (1965), then The Three Musketeers (1966), The Anniversary (1968), Barlow at Large (1973), Edward the Seventh (1975), Battle of the Sexes (1976), When the Boat Comes In (1976), Dave Allen At Large (1976-78), Hazell (1979), One By One (1985), Prospects (1986), Boon (1989), Spender (1992), The Glass Virgin (1995), Shooting Fish (1997), A Soldier's Tunic (2004) and Casualty (2007).
Facts
In the early 1980s Ralph worked as a teacher in London. Here he is, on Twitter!
In 2016 Toby Hadoke released his Who's Round interview with Ralph here.

Sean Caffrey (Lord Palmerdale) Apr 15 1940 to Apr 25 2013
Career highlights
Belfast born Sean first appeared in Londoners (1965), and later took roles in The Viking Queen (1967), No Hiding Place (1967), Coronation Street (1968), When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth (1970), The Regiment (1973), Sutherland's Law (1975), Survivors (1977), Minder (1980), Airline (1982), Harry's Game (1982), Curse of the Pink Panther (1983), Edge of Darkness (1985), Galloping Galaxies! (1985), Covington Cross (1992), The Bill (1994), Divorcing Jack (1998) and Eureka Street (1999).
Facts
Sean was also a set designer and writer in his native Northern Ireland.

Alan Rowe (Lord Skinsale) Dec 14 1926 to Oct 21 2000
Doctor Who credits
Played: Voice from Space Control in The Moonbase (1967)
Played: Dr Evans in The Moonbase (1967)
Played: Edward of Wessex in The Time Warrior (1973-74)
Played: Skinsale in Horror of Fang Rock (1977)
Played: Garif in Full Circle (1980)
Career highlights
New Zealander Alan's career began with You Never Can Tell (1955), then Sword of Freedom (1957) An Age of Kings (1960), Maigret (1963), The Forsyte Saga (1967), The First Churchills (1969), Heil Caesar! (1973), The XYY Man (1976), Crown Court (1975-79, as Justice Quinlan), Number 10 (1983), Morgan's Boy (1984), Lovejoy (1986), The Manageress (1989-90), Forever Green (1989-92) and Wycliffe (1997).
Facts
He was the long-term partner of actor Geoffrey Bayldon, who appeared in Doctor Who: The Creature from the Pit (1979).

Annette Woollett (Adelaide Lesage) Born 1956
Career highlights
Doctor Who was Annette's last credited role; she had previously worked on Emmerdale Farm (1972), Upstairs, Downstairs (1973) and two Thrillers (1974/75).
Facts
Annette Woollett is actually a stage name adopted by Lucy Maxwell-Cooze, who now lives in South Wales. Of all the guest actors to have appeared in Doctor Who over the decades, Annette is one of the least likely to have a fan page "shrine" devoted to her, but nevertheless, here it is!

Rio Fanning (Harker) Born Nov 7 1931
Career highlights
Rio made his acting debut in Private Investigator (1959), and then Fred Emney Picks a Pop (1960), Taxi! (1964), This Man Craig (1966), The Jazz Age (1968), The Champions (1969, ironically as a lighthouse keeper), Tom Grattan's War (1970), Budgie (1971-72), The Regiment (1972-73), Within These Walls (1974-75), Rooms (1975), Couples (1976), Blake's 7 (1980), Emmerdale Farm (1980), Diamonds (1981), Harry's Game (1982), Casualty (1986), All Creatures Great and Small (1978/90), Priest (1994), Father Ted (1996), Monk Dawson (1998), Hatfields & McCoys (2012) and 13 Steps Down (2012). He had a long-running role as Dr O'Casey in The District Nurse (1984). In the 1990s Rio branched into writing, including The Mixer (1992), William Shatner's A Twist in the Tale (1998), Ballykissangel (1997-98) and Relic Hunter (2002); he was also a storyliner on soap EastEnders in 1991.
Facts
Rio is now a director of a company which trains and develops interpersonal skills, and regularly runs workshops on writing and presentation. He is married to actress Karen Ford, best remembered as Miss Booth in school soap Grange Hill (1985-91).
In 2014 Toby Hadoke released his Who's Round interview with Rio here.

CREW

Terrance Dicks (writer) Born Apr 14 1935
Doctor Who credits
Script edited: The Invasion, The Krotons, The Seeds of Death, The War Games, Spearhead from Space, Doctor Who and the Silurians, The Ambassadors of Death, Inferno, Terror of the Autons, The Mind of Evil, The Claws of Axos, Colony in Space, The Daemons, Day of the Daleks, The Curse of Peladon, The Sea Devils, The Mutants, The Time Monster, The Three Doctors, Carnival of Monsters, Frontier in Space, Planet of the Daleks, The Green Death, The Time Warrior, Invasion of the Dinosaurs, Death to the Daleks, The Monster of Peladon, Planet of the Spiders (1968-74)
Wrote: The War Games (1969), Robot (1974-75), The Brain of Morbius (1976, as Robin Bland), Horror of Fang Rock (1977), State of Decay (1980), The Five Doctors (1983)
Played: Man in Doctor Who and the Silurians (1970, uncredited)
Career highlights
Prolific writer Terrance also wrote for Crossroads (1964), The Avengers (1962-69), Moonbase 3 (1973), Space: 1999 (1976) and Beau Geste (1982). He took script editor duties on Moonbase 3 (1973), Great Expectations (1981), Stalky & Co. (1982), The Hound of the Baskervilles (1982, with Tom Baker as Sherlock Holmes), Dombey and Son (1983), Jane Eyre (1983), The Invisible Man (1984) and The Pickwick Papers (1985). As a producer, he worked on Oliver Twist (1985), Alice in Wonderland (1986), Brat Farrar (1986), David Copperfield (1986), The Diary of Anne Frank (1987) and Vanity Fair (1987).
Facts
Terrance has maintained his links to Doctor Who over the years, having written over 60 TV story novelisations, as well as two stageplays - Doctor Who and the Daleks in the Seven Keys to Doomsday (1974) and The Ultimate Adventure (1989) - a number of spin-off video and audio dramas, and original titles in the Virgin New Adventures, Missing Adventures, BBC Books and Quick Reads ranges. Away from Doctor Who, Terrance has also written extensively for children's fiction and non-fiction book ranges since 1976, including Star Quest, The Mounties, The Baker Street Irregulars, Cry Vampire, The Adventures of Goliath, Chronicles of a Computer Game Addict, The Unexplained and many more.

Paddy Russell (director)
Doctor Who credits
Directed: The Massacre of St Bartholomew's Eve (1966), Invasion of the Dinosaurs (1974), Pyramids of Mars (1975), Horror of Fang Rock (1977)
Career highlights
Paddy had worked in the 1950s as production assistant on various Rudolph Cartier shows, as well as the Quatermass serials and the 1954 adaptation of George Orwell's 1984. Paddy also directed for Compact (1962), The Mind of the Enemy (1965), The Newcomers (1967), Late Night Horror (1968), Little Women (1970), The Moonstone (1972), Harriet's Back in Town (1973), My Old Man (1975), Z Cars (1967-76), Within These Walls (1975-76), 3-2-1 (1979-80), The Omega Factor (1979), The Squad (1980) and Pick of the Week (1988).
Facts
Along with Julia Smith (who directed two Doctor Who stories in 1966/67), Paddy was one of the first two female directors for the BBC.

Graham Williams (producer) May 24 1945 to Aug 17 1990 (shooting incident)
Doctor Who credits
Produced: Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers, Underworld, The Invasion of Time, The Ribos Operation, The Pirate Planet, The Stones of Blood, The Androids of Tara, The Power of Kroll, The Armageddon Factor, Destiny of the Daleks, City of Death, The Creature from the Pit, Nightmare of Eden, The Horns of Nimon, Shada (unbroadcast) (1977-80)
Wrote: The Invasion of Time (1978, as David Agnew), City of Death (1979, as David Agnew)
Career highlights
Graham wrote for Target (1977), was script editor on The View from Daniel Pike (1971-73), Sutherland's Law (1973), Barlow at Large (1975) and Z Cars (1975-77), and produced Super Gran (1986-87).
Facts
In 1985 Graham helped design the text computer game Doctor Who and the Warlord. In 1986 Graham pitched a script for Doctor Who's 23rd season, The Nightmare Fair, but when the programme was put on hiatus for 18 months, he eventually wrote the story as a novel in 1989. It was adapted as an audio adventure featuring Colin Baker and Nicola Bryant in 2009. At the time of his death Graham was running the Hartnoll Hotel in Tiverton, Devon. It is commonly believed that Graham may have accidentally shot himself while cleaning his firearm, although there is another, unsubstantiated, rumour that he may have committed suicide.

Robert Holmes (script editor) Apr 2 1926 to May 24 1986 (chronic liver ailment)
Doctor Who credits
Wrote: The Krotons (1968-69), The Space Pirates (1969), Spearhead from Space (1970), Terror of the Autons (1971), Carnival of Monsters (1973), The Time Warrior (1973-74), The Ark in Space (1975), Pyramids of Mars (1975, uncredited), The Brain of Morbius (1976, uncredited), The Deadly Assassin (1976), The Talons of Weng-Chiang (1977), The Sun Makers (1977), The Ribos Operation (1978), The Power of Kroll (1978-79), The Caves of Androzani (1984), The Two Doctors (1985), The Trial of a Time Lord (1986)
Script edited: Robot, The Ark in Space (uncredited), The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, Planet of Evil, Pyramids of Mars, The Android Invasion, The Brain of Morbius, The Seeds of Doom, The Masque of Mandragora, The Hand of Fear, The Deadly Assassin (uncredited), The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang (uncredited), Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers (uncredited) (1974-78)
Career highlights
He began writing for TV as early as Knight Errant Limited (1960), and went on to write scripts for Deadline Midnight (1961), Ghost Squad (1962), Emergency Ward 10 (1962-63), Dr Finlay's Casebook (1964-65), Undermind (1965), No Hiding Place (1965-67), Public Eye (1965-68), Mr Rose (1967-68), Doomwatch (1971), Spyder's Web (1972), Dixon of Dock Green (1974), Jukes of Piccadilly (1980), The Nightmare Man (1981), Blake's 7 (1979/81), Into the Labyrinth (1981-82) and Bergerac (1983-87). He was also story editor on Armchair Thriller and Shoestring, both in 1980.
Facts
Robert was the youngest ever commissioned officer in the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, serving in Burma. After he left the Army he joined the police, then became a journalist and sports writer - he was the last ever editor of British lifestyle publication John Bull Magazine in 1964. He was originally going to write Doctor Who's 20th anniversary tale in 1983, but when he found the numerous elements he'd been asked to incorporate unworkable, he was replaced by Terrance Dicks. Robert died while writing the final two episodes of The Trial of a Time Lord, and due to tensions in the Doctor Who production office at the time, his original ending for the story had to be changed and written afresh by Pip and Jane Baker. His face was also one of those seen during the Time Lord mind battle in The Brain of Morbius.

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