Wednesday, July 16, 2014

The Face of Evil

Neeva (David Garfield) gives it to
Xoanon (Tom Baker) full in the face
Four episodes (Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four)
First broadcast Jan 1 to 22 1977
Average audience for serial: 11.20m

CAST

Tom Baker (The Doctor) Born Jan 20 1934
Doctor Who credits
Played: The Doctor in Robot, The Ark in Space, The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, Planet of Evil, Pyramids of Mars, The Android Invasion, The Brain of Morbius, The Seeds of Doom, The Masque of Mandragora, The Hand of Fear, The Deadly Assassin, The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang, Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers, Underworld, The Invasion of Time, The Ribos Operation, The Pirate Planet, The Stones of Blood, The Androids of Tara, The Power of Kroll, The Armageddon Factor, Destiny of the Daleks, City of Death, The Creature from the Pit, Nightmare of Eden, The Horns of Nimon, Shada (unbroadcast), The Leisure Hive, Meglos, Full Circle, State of Decay, Warriors' Gate, The Keeper of Traken, Logopolis (1974-81). Return appearances in The Five Doctors (1983, archive footage), Dimensions in Time (1993), The Day of the Doctor (2013, as The Curator - but I think we all know who he was really!).
Tom also played the Doctor in the 1975 audio story Doctor Who and the Pescatons, and in several BBC and Big Finish audios since 2009.
Played: Meglos in Meglos (1980)
Career highlights
Tom's career began with a 1968 adaptation of The Winter's Tale, followed by roles in George and the Dragon (1968), Z Cars (1968), Softly Softly (1970), Nicholas and Alexandra (1971), The Canterbury Tales (1972), The Vault of Horror (1973), The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973), The Mutations (1974), Piccadilly Circus (1977), Late Night Story (1978), The Book Tower (1979-81), The Curse of King Tut's Tomb (1980), The Hound of the Baskervilles (1982, as Sherlock Holmes), Jemima Shore Investigates (1983), Remington Steele (1984), Blackadder II (1986), Roland Rat: The Series (1986), The Kenny Everett Television Show (1986), The Life and Loves of a She-Devil (1986), The Silver Chair (1990), Selling Hitler (1991), The Law Lord (1992), Cluedo (1992), Backtime (1998), Max Bear (2000), Dungeons and Dragons (2000), Fun at the Funeral Parlour (2001), Strange (2003), Fort Boyard (2003), Swiss Toni (2003), The Magic Roundabout (2005), Agatha Christie's Marple (2007), The Beeps (2007-08) and The Genie in the Bottle (2010). Tom has also had regular roles as Prof Geoffrey Hoyt in Medics (1992-95), Professor Wyvern in Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased) (2000-01) and Donald MacDonald in Monarch of the Glen (2004-05). He is probably most famous in his latter career for providing the eccentric narration for sketch series Little Britain between 2003-08.
Facts
Tom left home at 15 to become a monk with the Brothers of Ploermel on Jersey, but abandoned this profession at the age of 21 in favour of National Service. In 1971 Tom was nominated for two Golden Globe Awards for his portrayal of Rasputin in Nicholas and Alexandra (he was beaten by Ben Johnson and Desi Arnaz Jr). In December 1980 he married actress Lalla Ward (who had been companion Romana in Doctor Who since 1979), but the marriage ended 18 months later. He married third wife Sue Jerrard in 1986, previously an assistant editor on Doctor Who. Tom's old drinking buddies in the 1960s and 70s included artist Francis Bacon at the infamous Colony Room. Tom has several links to popular music - appearing on Technocat's single Only Human (1995), and providing a monologue on Witness to a Murder (Part Two) by Mansun (1998 - his Doctor and the TARDIS also appeared on the cover of the band's album Six). Pop band The Human League released a song entitled Tom Baker in 1980. In 1999 Tom published a short fairytale novel called The Boy Who Kicked Pigs, which has since been adapted for the stage. Tom's distinctive vocals can also be heard at various tourist attractions in the UK, such as the London Dungeon, Natural History Museum and Alton Towers' Nemesis ride. In 2006 Tom recorded 11,593 phrases so his voice could be used for BT's text messaging service to raise money for homeless charity Shelter - as a result record producer Mark Murphy created a single of Tom "singing" You Really Got Me by the Kinks.

Louise Jameson (Leela) Born Apr 20 1951
Doctor Who credits
Played: Leela in The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang, Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers, Underworld, The Invasion of Time (1977-78). Return appearance in Dimensions in Time (1993)
Career highlights
Louise made her screen debut in a 1971 adaptation of Tom Brown's Schooldays, and then took roles in Cider with Rosie (1971), Disciple of Death (1972), Emmerdale Farm (1973), Space: 1999 (1975), The Peddler (1976), Dominic (1976), The Gentle Touch (1984), The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Age 13¾ (1985), The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole (1987), Molly (1994), Wycliffe (1995), The Upper Hand (1996), River City (2008), Doc Martin (2011), Holby City (2012) and The Tractate Middoth (2013). She has had a number of regular roles over the years, including Dr Anne Reynolds in The Omega Factor (1979), Blanche Simmons in Tenko (1981-82), Susan Young in Bergerac (1985-90), Janet in Rides (1992-93) and Rosa Di Marco in soap EastEnders (1998-2000).
Facts
Louise was persuaded to become an actress when she was working as a prison visitor and met Leslie Grantham, then serving 12 years for manslaughter but later to become famous as EastEnders' Den Watts (and who was also in Resurrection of the Daleks in 1984).

David Garfield (Neeva)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Von Weich in The War Games (1969)
Played: Neeva in The Face of Evil (1977)
Career highlights
David's debut came in 1963's She's a Free Country, after which he appeared in The Spies (1966), The Prisoner (1967), Manhunt (1970), Elizabeth R (1971), Fish (1973), Anne of Avonlea (1975), The Changes (1975), Poldark (1975-76), Lorna Doone (1976), A Question of Guilt (1980), Citizen Smith (1980), The District Nurse (1987), Cadfael (1994), Born and Bred (2005), The IT Crowd (2006) and Stella (2012). He also wrote over 30 scripts for soap Crossroads between 1974-84.

Victor Lucas (Andor) Jul 12 1919 to Nov 17 2000
Career highlights
His first credit was in Under Capricorn (1949), then Murder in the Cathedral (1952), The Blue Parrot (1953), Looking About (1962), The Flying Swan (1965), The Adventurer (1973), Juggernaut (1974), Rebecca (1979), World's End (1981), Bergerac (1983), Hot Metal (1989) and How to Get Ahead in Advertising (1989). He also played Torrence in Maigret (1960-63) and the House of Commons Speaker in The New Statesman (1989).
Facts
In a 2010 interview, actor Patrick Stewart said of Victor: "He was a notorious womanizer. From him, I learned to be immensely proud of being an actor, that it was an honorable profession. But he also let me know that it was an excellent way of getting laid. And from Victor I learned not to take things too seriously. I wish I could have taken a cue from him much earlier in my career than I did, because it took me years to start having fun. He was a striking figure, tall and stocky. He had this amazing red hair, and a red complexion to go with it. He would often flip through trade magazines pointing at actresses' headshots, saying 'Had her. Had her. She's a goer!' If you believed him, Victor had actually had most of the actresses in British theatre. Maybe he had, I don't know, but at 19, with one girlfriend behind me, I was very impressed."

Brendan Price (Tomas) Born Jun 24 1947
Career highlights
Brendan's first job was in Play of the Month Stephen D (1972), and then took roles in The Liver Birds (1972), Man at the Top (1972), Naughty Wives (1973), The Chinese Puzzle (1974), The Amorous Milkman (1975), The Sweeney (1976), Dear Ladies (1983), Boon (1986), Robin Hood (1986), Emmerdale (1993-94), The Nameless (1999), Dagon (2001), The Nun (2005), Doctors (2006), Savage Grace (2007), Paco's Men (2008), Plans for Tomorrow (2010), 11-11-11 (2011) and Angelus (2014). He had regular roles as Detective Sergeant Frank Bonney in Target (1977-78) and appeared in more than 40 episodes of Spanish drama Love in Difficult Times (2011-12).
Facts
Brendan has lived and worked in Spain for many years now.

Leslie Schofield (Calib) Born Dec 12 1938
Doctor Who credits
Played: Leroy in The War Games (1969)
Played: Calib in The Face of Evil (1977)
Career highlights
Character actor Leslie debuted in The Body Stealers (1969), after which he became a prolific face on British screens, notably in Department S (1969), Manhunt (1970), New Scotland Yard (1972), Menace (1973), Boy Dominic (1974), Rentaghost (1976), Star Wars (1977), Blake's 7 (1978), Force 10 from Navarone (1978), The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin (1978-79, as Tim), Grandad (1980), Hallelujah! (1983), Oliver Twist (1985), Clockwise (1986), Jonny Briggs (1985-87, as Jonny's dad), Gentlemen and Players (1988-89), Tricky Business (1991), Coronation Street (1992-93), The Brittas Empire (1994), Wokenwell (1997), The Last Detective (2003) and Midsomer Murders (2006). Two of his most memorable running roles were as Jeff Healy in soap EastEnders (1997-2000) and as security guard Len in sitcom The Smoking Room (2004-05).

Colin Thomas (Sole)
Doctor Who credits
Played: UNIT soldier in Doctor Who and the Silurians (1970, uncredited)
Played: Sole in The Face of Evil (1977)
Played: Station policeman in The Talons of Weng-Chiang (1977, uncredited)
Played: Mentiad in The Pirate Planet (1978, uncredited)
Played: Foster in The Keeper of Traken (1981, uncredited)
Played: Time Lord in Arc of Infinity (1983, uncredited)
Played: Elder in Planet of Fire (1984, uncredited)
Played: Pallbearer in Remembrance of the Daleks (1988, uncredited)
Career highlights
Colin debuted in The Fenn Street Gang (1972), then Dial M for Murder (1974), Love Among the Ruins (1975), Rooms (1975), Oil Strike North (1975), The Madness (1976), Singles (1984) and For Queen and Country (1988).

Lloyd McGuire (Lugo)
Career highlights
Debuting in Village Hall (1974), Lloyd's career really took off, with roles in Survivors (1976), Buccaneer (1980), Juliet Bravo (1981-83, as DS Bernie Duckworth), Max Headroom (1985), The Charmer (1987), One Foot in the Grave (1990), Spender (1991), Between the Lines (1992), Prime Suspect 2 (1992), The Thin Blue Line (1995), Hetty Wainthropp Investigates (1996), Silent Witness (1997), The Grand (1998), Maisie Raine (1999), Monarch of the Glen (2000), Ali G Indahouse (2002), Rosemary and Thyme (2004), Midsomer Murders (2006), Thieves Like Us (2007), The Queen (2009, as Edward Heath), The Shadow Line (2011), White Heat (2012), The Hour (2012) and Trollied (2013). He also had a long-running role as Bob Porter in Teachers (2001-04).

Tom Kelly (Guard)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Guard in The Face of Evil (1977), The Sun Makers (1977)
Played: Vardan in The Invasion of Time (1978)
Career highlights
Debuting in Angels (1976), Tom's other credits include Blake's 7 (1978), The Lost Boys (1978), Julius Caesar (1979), Agony (1981), Chintz (1981), Shine on Harvey Moon (1984), The Green Man (1990) and The Bill (1992). He may be remembered by cult TV fans as the soldier Sam Pearce in the railway station adventure of Sapphire and Steel (1979).
In 2016 Toby Hadoke released his Who's Round interview with Tom here.

Brett Forrest (Guard) Dec 15 1943 to Mar 27 2013
Career highlights
Brett made his debut in And Mother Makes Three in 1971, then took roles in A Little Bit of Wisdom (1975), Two's Company (1977), Blake's 7 (1978), Dempsey and Makepeace (1985), William Tell (1987), Hannay (1988), Crime Traveller (1997), Underground (1998) and My Dad's the Prime Minister (2003).

Leon Eagles (Jabel) Apr 6 1932 to Dec 16 1997
Career highlights
Debuting in The Cruise of the Toytown Belle in 1950, Leon's CV also includes Othello (1955), Carry On Sergeant (1958), The Avengers (1963), Judith Paris (1964), Grady (1970), The Black Tulip (1970), The Onedin Line (1972), The Jensen Code (1973), Steptoe and Son (1974), Love for Lydia (1977), The Tomorrow People (1978), Crossroads (1978), The Squad (1980), Gulliver in Lilliput (1982), Bottle Boys (1985), Chocky's Challenge (1986) and Agatha Christie: Poirot (1991).

Mike Elles (Gentek)
Career highlights
Mike debuted in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1972), and then Fall of Eagles (1974), The Sweeney (1976), Mr Big (1977), Tenko (1981), The Secret Adversary (1983), A Small Problem (1987), After Work (2006) and Monomania (2014).
Facts
Mike also worked as a carpenter.

Peter Baldock (Acolyte) Born May 19 1949
Career highlights
Peter's other acting work include Among the Cinders (1984) and The Murder House (1998). Peter moved behind the camera in the late 1970s, working as a sound editor on Blade Runner (1982), Dangerous Liaisons (1988), The Tomorrow People (1992-94), Hackers (1995), Our Friends in the North (1997), Welcome to Sarajevo (1997), Tomorrow Never Dies (1997), The Beach (2000), 9 Dead Gay Guys (2002), S Club Seeing Double (2003), Creep (2004), The Alan Clark Diaries (2006), Inside the Twin Towers (2006), Control (2007), The Imaginarium of Dr Parnassus (2009), Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll (2010) and Second Coming (2014).
Facts
He won a BAFTA and a Royal Television Society award for Best Sound - Factual in 2007 for his work on 9/11: The Twin Towers (2006). He is now the owner of sound design company Art4Noise, which Peter established in 2004.

Rob Edwards (Xoanon voice) Born May 24 1949
Doctor Who credits
Played: Xoanon voice in The Face of Evil (1977)
Played: Chub in The Robots of Death (1977)
Career highlights
Debuting in Gangsters (1976), Rob's further credits include Just William (1977), The Fourth Arm (1983), By the Sword Divided (1983-85), The Practice (1986), Aliens in the Family (1987), Mother Love (1989), Soldier Soldier (1993), Harry (1995), Dangerfield (1996), Hamlet (1996), Dalziel and Pascoe (2006), Margaret Thatcher: The Long Walk to Finchley (2008) and The Thick of It (2005-12).
Facts
He was nominated for a Laurence Olivier Theatre Award in 2000 for Best Actor in a Musical for his performance as Scar in The Lion King at the Lyceum Theatre.
In 2016 Toby Hadoke released his Who's Round interview with Rob here.

Pamela Salem (Xoanon voice) Born Jan 22 1950
Doctor Who credits
Played: Xoanon voice in The Face of Evil (1977)
Played: Toos in The Robots of Death (1977)
Played: Rachel Jensen in Remembrance of the Daleks (1988)
Career highlights
Indian-born Pamela has one of the most familiar faces on British TV, her career starting with 1969's Happy Ever After, then Out of the Unknown (1971), Jason King (1971), The Onedin Line (1972), The Carnforth Practice (1974), Van der Valk (1977), Blake's 7 (1978), The Bitch (1979), Flesh and Blood (1980), Buccaneer (1980), Into the Labyrinth (1981-82), Never Say Never Again (1983, as Miss Moneypenny to Sean Connery's 007), The Tripods (1984), Ever Decreasing Circles (1984), Magnum P.I (1985), Howards' Way (1986), Succubus (1987), All Creatures Great and Small (1978/80/88, as Zoe Bennett), EastEnders (1988-89), French Fields (1989-91), Perfect Scoundrels (1992), ER (1996), Gods and Monsters (1998), Party of Five (2000), Licensed by Royalty (2003), The West Wing (2005, as the British PM!), Big Love (2010) and Pig (2011).
Facts
Pamela originally auditioned for the role of companion Leela in The Face of Evil, but instead got a guest role in the following story. She is married to prolific Irish actor Michael O'Hagan.

Anthony Frieze (Xoanon voice) Born Nov 19 1965
Facts
This is Australian-born Anthony's only acting credit. He was a pupil at the school where director Pennant Roberts's wife taught at the time. Anthony is now a Conservative Party activist, having stood for the Darlington constituency in the 2005 General Election, placing second to Alan Milburn with 26% of the vote. Anthony was a contemporary of British Prime Minister David Cameron and cabinet minister Michael Gove at Oxford University in the 1980s: in January 1988 a campus newspaper claimed Gove and Frieze were among a group of five student politicians who ended up in bed together after a ball. However, in an "expose" of this incident in a 2008 Daily Mail story, participant Flora McClean claimed no such thing occurred. In 2010 Anthony was mistakenly arrested on suspicion of theft in an incident near the Saatchi Gallery in London, but in actual fact he had been caught up in apprehending the real thief who had made off with a woman's laptop and phone. Police arrested both men at the scene, and Anthony spent the night in a police cell until it was ascertained that it was actually Teejay Moore who was guilty of the crime (he was jailed for six months).

Roy Herrick (Xoanon voice) Jul 22 1936 to Oct 11 1988
Doctor Who credits
Played: Jean in The Reign of Terror (1964)
Played: Voice of Xoanon in The Face of Evil (1977)
Played: Parsons in The Invisible Enemy (1977)
Career highlights
Roy's further work included The Spread of the Eagle (1963), Object Z (1965), Macbeth (1970), Public Eye (1971), Colditz (1974), Survivors (1976), George and Mildred (1979), Tenko (1981), Fresh Fields (1984) and Howards' Way (1985). He regularly played Jeffrey Sissons in The Regiment (1972-73).

CREW

Chris Boucher (writer) Born 1943
Doctor Who credits
Wrote: The Face of Evil (1977), The Robots of Death (1977), Image of the Fendahl (1977)
Career highlights
Chris started out as a satirical and comedy sketch writer for the likes of Braden's Week (1968) and The Saturday Crowd (1969), later writing for Dave Allen At Large (1971), Romany Jones (1973), That's Life! (1973), Shoestring (1980), Juliet Bravo (1982), Home James! (1987) and The Bill (1990). Chris also played a major role in developing drama in the late 1970s and 80s, becoming script editor and occasional writer on Blake's 7 (1978-81), script editor of Bergerac (1981), and series deviser of Star Cops (1987). In more recent years Chris has written novels and audio dramas based upon the worlds he created in Blake's 7 and Doctor Who.

Pennant Roberts (director) Dec 15 1940 to Jun 22 2010 (cancer)
Doctor Who credits
Directed: The Face of Evil (1977), The Sun Makers (1977), The Pirate Planet (1978), Shada (1980, unfinished), Warriors of the Deep (1984), Timelash (1985)
Career highlights
Pennant's directing career began with Doomwatch in 1972, followed by work on The Regiment (1973), Sutherland's Law (1974), Oil Strike North (1975), Survivors (1975-76), Blake's 7 (1978), The Onedin Line (1979), Juliet Bravo (1980), Tenko (1981), Cold Warriors (1984), Howards' Way (1985), The Snow Spider (1988, for which he was nominated for a BAFTA for Best Children's Drama), The Bubblegum Brigade (1989), Emlyn's Moon (1990), The Chestnut Soldier (1991), Crime Story (1992), Wycliffe (1993) and The Sherman Plays (1993-97). He also acted as producer on a handful of these latter series.
Facts
Pennant was also chairman of the Directors' and Producers' Rights Society (now Directors UK), vice-president of the Strasbourg European Film Forum, chair of Media Skills Wales, a governor of the Welsh College of Music and Drama, and a board member of Sgrîn, the Welsh audiovisual media agency. He campaigned for many years for the rights of actors and directors to receive fees when programmes are repeated on television.

Philip Hinchcliffe (producer) Born Oct 1 1944
Doctor Who credits
Produced: The Ark in Space, The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, Planet of Evil, Pyramids of Mars, The Android Invasion, The Brain of Morbius, The Seeds of Doom, The Masque of Mandragora, The Hand of Fear, The Deadly Assassin, The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang (1975-77)
Career highlights
Doctor Who was one of Philip's first TV jobs, after being script editor on Alexander the Greatest (1971), You're Only Young Twice (1971), The Jensen Code (1973) and The Kids from 47A (1973-74). After leaving Doctor Who, Philip became producer on Target (1977-78), Private Schulz (1981), Nancy Astor (1982), Strangers and Brothers (1984), The Charmer (1987), Bust (1987-88), Friday On My Mind (1992), An Awfully Big Adventure (1995), Seesaw (1998), McCallum (1998), Rebus (2000-01) and Taggart (1999-2001). Philip has also written scripts for Crossroads (1970), Target (1977) and Bust (1987-88), and novelised three Doctor Who stories for Target Books.
Facts
Philip won the 1990 Prix Europa Fiction Prize for And a Nightingale Sang, a film adapted from C P Taylor's play by screenwriter Jack Rosenthal. In 1977 he was nominated for a BAFTA for his work on Doctor Who, and received a further nomination for Private Schulz. There was also an Emmy nomination for Nancy Astor, a mini-series he produced in 1982. His daughter Celina Hinchcliffe is a British TV sports presenter, including for SkySports. His brother-in-law is actor Geoffrey Whitehead. In 2014 Philip returned to the world of Doctor Who by writing two new audio serials for the Fourth Doctor and Leela for Big Finish Productions.

Robert Holmes (script editor) Apr 2 1926 to May 24 1986 (chronic liver ailment)
Doctor Who credits
Wrote: The Krotons (1968-69), The Space Pirates (1969), Spearhead from Space (1970), Terror of the Autons (1971), Carnival of Monsters (1973), The Time Warrior (1973-74), The Ark in Space (1975), Pyramids of Mars (1975, uncredited), The Brain of Morbius (1976, uncredited), The Deadly Assassin (1976), The Talons of Weng-Chiang (1977), The Sun Makers (1977), The Ribos Operation (1978), The Power of Kroll (1978-79), The Caves of Androzani (1984), The Two Doctors (1985), The Trial of a Time Lord (1986)
Script edited: Robot, The Ark in Space (uncredited), The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, Planet of Evil, Pyramids of Mars, The Android Invasion, The Brain of Morbius, The Seeds of Doom, The Masque of Mandragora, The Hand of Fear, The Deadly Assassin (uncredited), The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang (uncredited), Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers (uncredited) (1974-78)
Career highlights
He began writing for TV as early as Knight Errant Limited (1960), and went on to write scripts for Deadline Midnight (1961), Ghost Squad (1962), Emergency Ward 10 (1962-63), Dr Finlay's Casebook (1964-65), Undermind (1965), No Hiding Place (1965-67), Public Eye (1965-68), Mr Rose (1967-68), Doomwatch (1971), Spyder's Web (1972), Dixon of Dock Green (1974), Jukes of Piccadilly (1980), The Nightmare Man (1981), Blake's 7 (1979/81), Into the Labyrinth (1981-82) and Bergerac (1983-87). He was also story editor on Armchair Thriller and Shoestring, both in 1980.
Facts
Robert was the youngest ever commissioned officer in the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, serving in Burma. After he left the Army he joined the police, then became a journalist and sports writer - he was the last ever editor of British lifestyle publication John Bull Magazine in 1964. He was originally going to write Doctor Who's 20th anniversary tale in 1983, but when he found the numerous elements he'd been asked to incorporate unworkable, he was replaced by Terrance Dicks. Robert died while writing the final two episodes of The Trial of a Time Lord, and due to tensions in the Doctor Who production office at the time, his original ending for the story had to be changed and written afresh by Pip and Jane Baker. His face was also one of those seen during the Time Lord mind battle in The Brain of Morbius.

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