Friday, June 27, 2014

Revenge of the Cybermen

Back after six-and-a-half years...
Four episodes (Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four)
First broadcast Apr 19 to May 10 1975
Average audience for serial: 9.03m

CAST

Tom Baker (The Doctor) Born Jan 20 1934
Doctor Who credits
Played: The Doctor in Robot, The Ark in Space, The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, Planet of Evil, Pyramids of Mars, The Android Invasion, The Brain of Morbius, The Seeds of Doom, The Masque of Mandragora, The Hand of Fear, The Deadly Assassin, The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang, Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers, Underworld, The Invasion of Time, The Ribos Operation, The Pirate Planet, The Stones of Blood, The Androids of Tara, The Power of Kroll, The Armageddon Factor, Destiny of the Daleks, City of Death, The Creature from the Pit, Nightmare of Eden, The Horns of Nimon, Shada (unbroadcast), The Leisure Hive, Meglos, Full Circle, State of Decay, Warriors' Gate, The Keeper of Traken, Logopolis (1974-81). Return appearances in The Five Doctors (1983, archive footage), Dimensions in Time (1993), The Day of the Doctor (2013, as The Curator - but I think we all know who he was really!).
Tom also played the Doctor in the 1975 audio story Doctor Who and the Pescatons, and in several BBC and Big Finish audios since 2009.
Played: Meglos in Meglos (1980)
Career highlights
Tom's career began with a 1968 adaptation of The Winter's Tale, followed by roles in George and the Dragon (1968), Z Cars (1968), Softly Softly (1970), Nicholas and Alexandra (1971), The Canterbury Tales (1972), The Vault of Horror (1973), The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973), The Mutations (1974), Piccadilly Circus (1977), Late Night Story (1978), The Book Tower (1979-81), The Curse of King Tut's Tomb (1980), The Hound of the Baskervilles (1982, as Sherlock Holmes), Jemima Shore Investigates (1983), Remington Steele (1984), Blackadder II (1986), Roland Rat: The Series (1986), The Kenny Everett Television Show (1986), The Life and Loves of a She-Devil (1986), The Silver Chair (1990), Selling Hitler (1991), The Law Lord (1992), Cluedo (1992), Backtime (1998), Max Bear (2000), Dungeons and Dragons (2000), Fun at the Funeral Parlour (2001), Strange (2003), Fort Boyard (2003), Swiss Toni (2003), The Magic Roundabout (2005), Agatha Christie's Marple (2007), The Beeps (2007-08) and The Genie in the Bottle (2010). Tom has also had regular roles as Prof Geoffrey Hoyt in Medics (1992-95), Professor Wyvern in Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased) (2000-01) and Donald MacDonald in Monarch of the Glen (2004-05). He is probably most famous in his latter career for providing the eccentric narration for sketch series Little Britain between 2003-08.
Facts
Tom left home at 15 to become a monk with the Brothers of Ploermel on Jersey, but abandoned this profession at the age of 21 in favour of National Service. In 1971 Tom was nominated for two Golden Globe Awards for his portrayal of Rasputin in Nicholas and Alexandra (he was beaten by Ben Johnson and Desi Arnaz Jr). In December 1980 he married actress Lalla Ward (who had been companion Romana in Doctor Who since 1979), but the marriage ended 18 months later. He married third wife Sue Jerrard in 1986, previously an assistant editor on Doctor Who. Tom's old drinking buddies in the 1960s and 70s included artist Francis Bacon at the infamous Colony Room. Tom has several links to popular music - appearing on Technocat's single Only Human (1995), and providing a monologue on Witness to a Murder (Part Two) by Mansun (1998 - his Doctor and the TARDIS also appeared on the cover of the band's album Six). Pop band The Human League released a song entitled Tom Baker in 1980. In 1999 Tom published a short fairytale novel called The Boy Who Kicked Pigs, which has since been adapted for the stage. Tom's distinctive vocals can also be heard at various tourist attractions in the UK, such as the London Dungeon, Natural History Museum and Alton Towers' Nemesis ride. In 2006 Tom recorded 11,593 phrases so his voice could be used for BT's text messaging service to raise money for homeless charity Shelter - as a result record producer Mark Murphy created a single of Tom "singing" You Really Got Me by the Kinks.

Elisabeth Sladen (Sarah Jane Smith) Feb 1 1946 to Apr 19 2011 (pancreatic cancer)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Sarah Jane Smith in The Time Warrior (1973-74), Invasion of the Dinosaurs (1974), Death to the Daleks (1974), The Monster of Peladon (1974), Planet of the Spiders (1974), Robot (1974-75), The Ark in Space (1975), The Sontaran Experiment (1975), Genesis of the Daleks (1975), Revenge of the Cybermen (1975), Terror of the Zygons (1975), Planet of Evil (1975), Pyramids of Mars (1975), The Android Invasion (1975), The Brain of Morbius (1976), The Seeds of Doom (1976), The Masque of Mandragora (1976), The Hand of Fear (1976), K9 & Company (1981), The Five Doctors (1983), Dimensions in Time (1993), School Reunion (2006), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Invasion of the Bane (2007), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Revenge of the Slitheen (2007), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Eye of the Gorgon (2007), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Warriors of Kudlak (2007), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Whatever Happened to Sarah Jane? (2007), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Lost Boy (2007), The Stolen Earth/ Journey's End (2008), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Last Sontaran (2008), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Day of the Clown (2008), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Secrets of the Stars (2008), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Mark of the Berserker (2008), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Temptation of Sarah Jane Smith (2008), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Enemy of the Bane (2008), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Prisoner of the Judoon (2009), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Mad Woman in the Attic (2009), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Wedding of Sarah Jane Smith (2009), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Eternity Trap (2009), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Mona Lisa's Revenge (2009), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Gift (2009), The End of Time Part Two (2010), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Nightmare Man (2010), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Vault of Secrets (2010), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Death of the Doctor (2010), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Empty Planet (2010), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Lost in Time (2010), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Goodbye, Sarah Jane Smith (2010), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Sky (2011), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Curse of Clyde Langer (2011), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Man Who Never Was (2011).
Elisabeth also played Sarah in the 1975 audio story Doctor Who and the Pescatons, two BBC Radio stories - The Paradise of Death (1993) and The Ghosts of N-Space (1996) - and the fan video production Downtime (1995), as well as reprising the role for various Big Finish audio plays.
Career highlights
Elisabeth's earliest (uncredited) role was in Ferry Cross the Mersey (1965), then Coronation Street (1970), Z Cars (1971/72), Doomwatch (1972), Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em (1973), Hickory House (1973), Merry-Go-Round (1977), Send in the Girls (1978), Take My Wife (1979), Silver Dream Racer (1980), In Loving Memory (1980), Name for the Day (1980), Gulliver in Lilliput (1982), Dempsey and Makepeace (1985), Alice in Wonderland (1986), The Bill (1989), Men of the World (1994), Peak Practice (1996) and Faith in the Future (1996).
Facts
She was married to actor Brian Miller, also a Doctor Who alumni. Elisabeth appeared alongside seven of the TV Doctors (Doctors 1-5 either during her own era or in The Five Doctors, plus the Tenth and Eleventh Doctors in either 21st century Doctor Who or her own spin-off series). The Impossible Astronaut (2011) was dedicated to Elisabeth on its transmission, while a special programme entitled My Sarah Jane: A Tribute to Elisabeth Sladen aired on Children's BBC. BBC4 also repeated The Hand of Fear (1976) as a tribute.

Ian Marter (Harry Sullivan) Oct 28 1944 to Oct 28 1986 (diabetes-related heart attack)
Doctor Who credits
Played: John Andrews in Carnival of Monsters (1973)
Played: Harry Sullivan in Robot, The Ark in Space, The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, The Android Invasion (1974-75)
Career highlights
Ian played John Andrews in Carnival of Monsters (1973) and companion Harry Sullivan in seven serials between 1974-75. Ian's first acting credit was in Doctor Faustus (1967), followed by roles in The Abominable Dr Phibes (1971), Holly (1972), The Venturers (1975), Softly Softly (1975), The Brothers (1976), The Medusa Touch (1978, in which he was wrongly credited as Ian Master), ten episodes of Crown Court (1972/74/78), Hazell (1979), The Specialist (1980), Close to Home (1982), Shine On Harvey Moon (1984), Bergerac (1985) and The Return of Sherlock Holmes (1986).
Facts
He left Oxford University in 1969 to become a stage manager at the Bristol Old Vic circa 1970. He auditioned for the role of Captain Mike Yates in Doctor Who in 1970, and in later years took to writing, including nine novelisations of Doctor Who TV stories (courting controversy by using the word "bastard" in The Enemy of the World), as well as the original novel Harry Sullivan's War (1986), set a decade after Harry stopped travelling with the Doctor (Marter originally planned to kill Harry off at the end, but the publisher banned the idea). Ian died before completing his adaptation of The Rescue, which had to be completed by Nigel Robinson, and before he could adapt his promised sequel to Harry Sullivan's War. With the pen-name Ian Don, he also wrote the novelisation of the Hollywood films Splash (1984), Baby (1985), Tough Guys (1986) and Down and Out in Beverly Hills (1986), and several unpublished books based on the cartoon series The Gummi Bears. Another writing project that never saw the light of day was the script for an unmade film called Doctor Who Meets Scratchman, which he co-wrote with Tom Baker and James Hill in the mid-1970s.

Michael Wisher (Magrik) May 19 1935 to Jul 21 1995 (heart attack)
Doctor Who credits
Played: John Wakefield in The Ambassadors of Death (1970)
Played: Rex Farrel in Terror of the Autons (1971)
Played: Kalik in Carnival of Monsters (1973)
Played: Dalek voice in Frontier in Space (1973), Planet of the Daleks (1973), Death to the Daleks (1974), Genesis of the Daleks (1975, uncredited)
Played: Davros in Genesis of the Daleks (1975)
Played: Magrik in Revenge of the Cybermen (1975)
Played: Morelli in Planet of Evil (1975)
Career highlights
Michael made his acting debut in a 1963 edition of Suspense, and also appeared in No Hiding Place (1963), Adventure Weekly (1969), Colditz (1972), Moonbase 3 (1973), Dixon of Dock Green (1975), The Prince and the Pauper (1976), Airline (1982), Cover Her Face (1985), Alice in Wonderland (1986), Vanity Fair (1987), The Bill (1989) and EastEnders (1991).
Facts
Michael also appeared in a number of Doctor Who spin-off videos, such as Wartime (1987), Summoned by Shadows (1992), The Airzone Solution (1993) and Shakedown (1994). He also briefly appeared in the 1995 documentary Dalekmania. He was asked to reprise his iconic role of Davros in both 1979 and 1984, but stage tours restricted his availability. However, he did play Davros again in the 1993 stage play The Trial of Davros. Michael's son Andrew is also an actor.

Jeremy Wilkin (Kellman) Born Jun 6 1930
Career highlights
Jeremy's first role was in The Cruise of the Toytown Belle in 1950, after which he took work in Hamlet (1955), Producers' Workshop (1955), The Hill (1960), Sergeant Cork (1964), Undermind (1965), Man in a Suitcase (1967), The Troubleshooters (1969), Detective (1969), A Kiss is Just a Kiss (1971), Eyeless in Gaza (1971), The Hanged Man (1975), The New Avengers (1976/77), Blake's 7 (1978), Kessler (1981), Reilly: Ace of Spies (1983), Two (1996) and Just Cause (2002). Jeremy also has a long-standing association with Gerry Anderson's TV series, including providing the voices for Virgil Tracy in Thunderbirds (1966), Captain Ochre in Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons (1967-68), various characters in Joe 90 (1968-69), The Bishop in The Secret Service (1969), and playing Gordon Maxwell in the live action series UFO (1969-71).
Facts
To series creator Brian Clemens' annoyance, Jeremy vetoed permission to repeat his 1977 New Avengers episode Medium Rare on terrestrial TV.
In 2016 Toby Hadoke released his Who's Round interview with Jeremy here.

Ronald Leigh-Hunt (Commander Stevenson) Oct 5 1920* to Sep 12 2005 (broncho-pneumonia)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Commander Radnor in The Seeds of Death (1969)
Played: Commander Stevenson in Revenge of the Cybermen (1975)
Career highlights
Ronald's first credit was in 1950's Blackout, and he subsequently popped up in Three Steps to the Gallows (1953), Sword of Freedom (1957), Cards with Uncle Tom (1959), Oscar Wilde (1960), The Avengers (1961/65), Emergency Ward 10 (1964), Voodoo Blood Death (1965), Khartoum (1966), The Gamblers (1967), Hostile Witness (1968), Department S (1969), General Hospital (1972), Baxter! (1973), The Brothers (1975), The Omen (1976), The Professionals (1978), Blake's 7 (1980), Airline (1982), Remington Steele (1987), Slinger's Day (1987), Frankenstein (1992) and One Foot in the Grave (1995). Ronald, whose cousin was actress Barbara Leigh-Hunt, also had regular roles as King Arthur in The Adventures of Sir Lancelot (1956-57) and Colonel Buchan in Freewheelers (1968-71). * Obituaries claim Ronald was born in 1916, but birth records state 1920.

William Marlowe (Lester) Jul 25 1930 to Jan 31 2003
Doctor Who credits
Played: Mailer in The Mind of Evil (1971)
Played: Lester in Revenge of the Cybermen (1975)
Career highlights
Debuting in Tunes of Glory (1960), William's other credits include The Amazing Dr Clitterhouse (1962), Emergency Ward 10 (1963), Crane (1964), The Heroes of Telemark (1965), Wuthering Heights (1967), The Avengers (1969), Zeppelin (1971), Villains (1972), The Legend of Robin Hood (1975), Breakaway (1980), Revolution (1985), Cry Freedom (1987) and EastEnders (1991). William also had a regular role as Brian Kettle in Rooms (1977) and DCI Bill Russell in The Gentle Touch (1980-84).
Facts
William had two wives, both of them Doctor Who actresses - Catherine Schell between 1968-77 (who was in 1979's City of Death) and Kismet Delgado from 1979 (who was in Planet of the Spiders (1974) and was also Master actor Roger's widow). Many sources claim he was also married to actress Fernanda Marlowe (who played Corporal Bell in The Mind of Evil and The Claws of Axos in 1971), but this is incorrect.

Alec Wallis (Warner) Dec 2 1920 to Aug 12 2004
Doctor Who credits
Played: Ldg Telegraphist Bowman in The Sea Devils (1972)
Played: Warner in Revenge of the Cybermen (1975)
Career highlights
Debuting in Escape (1957), Alec's other work includes The Indian Tales of Rudyard Kipling (1964), R3 (1965), Happy Ever After (1969), Colditz (1972), Within These Walls (1975), Dickens of London (1976), Treasure Island (1977), Cowboys (1980), Bognor (1981), RHINO: Really Here In Name Only (1983), The Bill (1985/89), First of the Summer Wine (1988), Grange Hill (1983/89) and 2Point4 Children (1992).

David Collings (Vorus) Born Jun 4 1940
Doctor Who credits
Played: Vorus in Revenge of the Cybermen (1975)
Played: Poul in The Robots of Death (1977)
Played: Mawdryn in Mawdryn Undead (1983)
Career highlights
David debuted in a 1964 ITV Play of the Week, then took roles in Gideon's Way (1965), The Troubleshooters (1966), Point Counterpoint (1968), The Possessed (1969), Strange Report (1969), Scrooge (1970), UFO (1970), Elizabeth R (1971), The Regiment (1972), The Love School (1975), Treasure Island (1977), Midnight is a Place (1977-78), Breakaway (1980), Look and Read: Dark Towers (1981), Blake's 7 (1981), By the Sword Divided (1985), The Return of the Antelope (1988), Love Hurts (1992), The Darling Buds of May (1993), Press Gang (1989/93), Persuasion (1995), Wren: The Man Who Built Britain (2004) and The Invisible Woman (2013). He is perhaps best remembered as Silver in the telefantasy series Sapphire and Steel (1981-82), but fewer people might know he dubbed the English voice for the character of Monkey in the 1978-80 Japanese series of the same name (originally Saiyuki, based on the Chinese novel Journey to the West).
In 2017 Toby Hadoke released his Who's Round interview with David here.

Christopher Robbie (Cyber Leader) Born May 30 1938
Doctor Who credits
Played: The Karkus in The Mind Robber (1968)
Played: Cyber Leader in Revenge of the Cybermen (1975)
Career highlights
Christopher debuted in The Avengers (1964), followed by Where Has Poor Mickey Gone? (1964), The Expert (1969), Codename (1970), Pardon My Genie (1973), Dempsey and Makepeace (1985), The Lady and the Highwayman (1989), Taggart (1993), One Foot in the Grave (1997), The Commander (2003), Van Wilder 2: The Rise of Taj (2006), Holby City (2008) and Enemies Closer (2013).
Facts
Christopher's other talents include writing and directing stage plays, design and photography. He may also be remembered in the Southern Television region for his role as an in-vision announcer, a role he also performed over the years for Associated Rediffusion, Thames TV, TVS and Anglia TV.
In 2013 Toby Hadoke released his Who's Round interview with Christopher here.

Kevin Stoney (Tyrum) Jan 22 1921 to Jan 22 2008 (skin cancer)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Mavic Chen in The Daleks' Master Plan (1965-66)
Played: Tobias Vaughn in The Invasion (1968)
Played: Tyrum in Revenge of the Cybermen (1975)
Career highlights
Kevin's career began in 1950's The Gentle Gunman, followed by David Copperfield (1956), William Tell (1959), The Adventures of Robin Hood (1958-60), The Six Proud Walkers (1962), Murder at the Gallop (1963), The Prisoner (1967), Doomwatch (1970), Spy Trap (1972), The Tomorrow People (1973), The New Avengers (1976), Quatermass (1979), Bergerac (1981-83), Hannay (1988), Inspector Morse (1993) and Alleyn Mysteries (1993). Kevin also played the character Thrasyllus in both The Caesars (1968) and I, Claudius (1976).
Facts
Kevin was voted the Daily Mail's Villain of the Year in 1965 for his memorable role in The Daleks' Master Plan. In 1985 Kevin's very premature death was announced in a Doctor Who fanzine, but he made an appearance at a 1987 convention to prove he was still alive and kicking!

Brian Grellis (Sheprah) Born 1937
Doctor Who credits
Played: Sheprah in Revenge of the Cybermen (1975)
Played: Safran in The Invisible Enemy (1977)
Played: Megaphone man in Snakedance (1983)
Career highlights
Brian's earliest credit was in The Edgar Wallace Mystery Theatre in 1963, followed by roles in Only When I Larf (1968), The First Lady (1969), Trial (1971), On the Buses (1971), Jason King (1972), Whatever Happened to the Likely Lads (1973), The Brothers (1974), Circus (1975), The Good Life (1976), Survivors (1976), Room Service (1979), A Tale of Two Cities (1980), Bergerac (1983), Threads (1984), Brookside (1986) and Help! (1986). He also regularly played Detective Sergeant Bowker in Z Cars (1974-78).

Melville Jones (Cyberman)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Guard in The Time Monster (1972)
Played: Cyberman in Revenge of the Cybermen (1975)
Career highlights
Melville's other work includes Warship (1977), Fathers and Families (1977) and Phoelix (1980).
Facts
Melville gave up acting to become a writer, including plays for BBC radio, and the first ever dramatisation of an Inspector Morse novel, years before the ITV series. In the late 1990s Melville began lecturing in creative writing at Cornwall College.

CREW

Gerry Davis (writer) Feb 23 1930 to Aug 31 1991
Doctor Who credits
Wrote: The Celestial Toymaker (episode 1, 1966, uncredited), The Tenth Planet (1966), The Highlanders (1966-67), The Tomb of the Cybermen (1967), Revenge of the Cybermen (1975)
Script edited: The Massacre of St Bartholomew's Eve (episode 4), The Ark, The Celestial Toymaker, The Gunfighters, The Savages, The War Machines, The Smugglers, The Tenth Planet, The Power of the Daleks, The Highlanders, The Underwater Menace, The Moonbase, The Macra Terror, The Faceless Ones, The Evil of the Daleks (episodes 1-3) (1966-67)
Career highlights
Gerry started out writing for the soap Coronation Street (1960) and also penned for United! (1965), The First Lady (1968), Doomwatch (1970), The Bionic Woman (1976), Vega$ (1979), The Final Countdown (1980), Captain Power and the Soldiers of the Future (1987) and Deadly Nightmares (1989). He also script edited Doomwatch (1970-71) and Softly Softly: Task Force (1971-72).
Facts
In the 1970s, Gerry co-wrote three science-fiction novels with Dr Kit Pedler, and after moving to the USA in the 1970s teamed up with Dalek creator Terry Nation in an unsuccessful bid to buy the rights to make Doctor Who after the BBC ceased its production in 1989. He also taught screenwriting at the UCLA film school in the 1980s. Gerry died within days of colleague Innes Lloyd.

Michael E Briant (director) Born Feb 14 1942
Doctor Who credits
Assistant floor manager: The Crusade (1965, uncredited)
Production assistant: The Power of the Daleks (1966, uncredited), Fury from the Deep (1968, uncredited)
Directed: Colony in Space (1971), The Sea Devils (1972), The Green Death (1973), Death to the Daleks (1974), Revenge of the Cybermen (1975, as Michael E Briant), The Robots of Death (1977, as Michael E Briant)
Played: Radio DJ (voice) in The Sea Devils (1972, uncredited)
Played: Monitor voice in Revenge of the Cybermen (1975, uncredited)
Career highlights
Michael's first directing credit was on The Newcomers (1965), then The Doctors (1969), Z Cars (1970/74), Sutherland's Law (1973), Warship (1976-77), Treasure Island (1977), Blake's 7 (1978), The Onedin Line (1978), Secret Army (1978-79), Breakaway (1980), Blood Money (1981), Kessler (1981), One By One (1985), Howards' Way (1987), Spijkerhoek (1989-90), Zonder Ernst (1992) and EastEnders (1995). He had also taken an acting role in the 1952 series Billy Bunter of Greyfriars School, as well as The Little Round House (1955) and True as a Turtle (1957); he also wrote and directed the 1980 adaptation of A Tale of Two Cities.
Facts
Michael is now a keen Spain-based yachtsman and sailor and travels the world filming excursions - and occasionally getting attacked by pirates, according to his website! Michael says he was asked by Doctor Who producer Graham Williams to direct a Season 15 story, but was unavailable - after that, he was not asked back. Michael directed his final two Doctor Who stories as Michael E Briant (E for Edwin).

Philip Hinchcliffe (producer) Born Oct 1 1944
Doctor Who credits
Produced: The Ark in Space, The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, Planet of Evil, Pyramids of Mars, The Android Invasion, The Brain of Morbius, The Seeds of Doom, The Masque of Mandragora, The Hand of Fear, The Deadly Assassin, The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang (1975-77)
Career highlights
Doctor Who was one of Philip's first TV jobs, after being script editor on Alexander the Greatest (1971), You're Only Young Twice (1971), The Jensen Code (1973) and The Kids from 47A (1973-74). After leaving Doctor Who, Philip became producer on Target (1977-78), Private Schulz (1981), Nancy Astor (1982), Strangers and Brothers (1984), The Charmer (1987), Bust (1987-88), Friday On My Mind (1992), An Awfully Big Adventure (1995), Seesaw (1998), McCallum (1998), Rebus (2000-01) and Taggart (1999-2001). Philip has also written scripts for Crossroads (1970), Target (1977) and Bust (1987-88), and novelised three Doctor Who stories for Target Books.
Facts
Philip won the 1990 Prix Europa Fiction Prize for And a Nightingale Sang, a film adapted from C P Taylor's play by screenwriter Jack Rosenthal. In 1977 he was nominated for a BAFTA for his work on Doctor Who, and received a further nomination for Private Schulz. There was also an Emmy nomination for Nancy Astor, a mini-series he produced in 1982. His daughter Celina Hinchcliffe is a British TV sports presenter, including for SkySports. His brother-in-law is actor Geoffrey Whitehead. In 2014 Philip returned to the world of Doctor Who by writing two new audio serials for the Fourth Doctor and Leela for Big Finish Productions.

Robert Holmes (script editor) Apr 2 1926 to May 24 1986 (chronic liver ailment)
Doctor Who credits
Wrote: The Krotons (1968-69), The Space Pirates (1969), Spearhead from Space (1970), Terror of the Autons (1971), Carnival of Monsters (1973), The Time Warrior (1973-74), The Ark in Space (1975), Pyramids of Mars (1975, uncredited), The Brain of Morbius (1976, uncredited), The Deadly Assassin (1976), The Talons of Weng-Chiang (1977), The Sun Makers (1977), The Ribos Operation (1978), The Power of Kroll (1978-79), The Caves of Androzani (1984), The Two Doctors (1985), The Trial of a Time Lord (1986)
Script edited: Robot, The Ark in Space (uncredited), The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, Planet of Evil, Pyramids of Mars, The Android Invasion, The Brain of Morbius, The Seeds of Doom, The Masque of Mandragora, The Hand of Fear, The Deadly Assassin (uncredited), The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang (uncredited), Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers (uncredited) (1974-78)
Career highlights
He began writing for TV as early as Knight Errant Limited (1960), and went on to write scripts for Deadline Midnight (1961), Ghost Squad (1962), Emergency Ward 10 (1962-63), Dr Finlay's Casebook (1964-65), Undermind (1965), No Hiding Place (1965-67), Public Eye (1965-68), Mr Rose (1967-68), Doomwatch (1971), Spyder's Web (1972), Dixon of Dock Green (1974), Jukes of Piccadilly (1980), The Nightmare Man (1981), Blake's 7 (1979/81), Into the Labyrinth (1981-82) and Bergerac (1983-87). He was also story editor on Armchair Thriller and Shoestring, both in 1980.
Facts
Robert was the youngest ever commissioned officer in the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, serving in Burma. After he left the Army he joined the police, then became a journalist and sports writer - he was the last ever editor of British lifestyle publication John Bull Magazine in 1964. He was originally going to write Doctor Who's 20th anniversary tale in 1983, but when he found the numerous elements he'd been asked to incorporate unworkable, he was replaced by Terrance Dicks. Robert died while writing the final two episodes of The Trial of a Time Lord, and due to tensions in the Doctor Who production office at the time, his original ending for the story had to be changed and written afresh by Pip and Jane Baker. His face was also one of those seen during the Time Lord mind battle in The Brain of Morbius.

4 comments:

  1. It would be good if we could get a full set of dates for Alec Wallis (Revenge of the Cybermen/The Sea Devils). He died in 2004 and yet over the past decade there still hasn't been any successful research done on his birth date.

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    Replies
    1. I've had difficulty finding it on Find My Past & Ancestry. Alec may not have been his birth name - it could have been Alexander or something. Then again, maybe his year of death is wrong. Oddly, for a while I kept adding his death to his Wikipedia page but it kept getting taken down.

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    2. Has it been confirmed that Alec Wallis has actually died? Over the years we have a few people who were supposedly dead but turned out to be alive!

      And yes, sometimes actors change their names and so it can be hard to find the original one. I remember finding out that actor Ric Felgate had a different first name. I forget what it is now, but 'Ric' was not his original first name.

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  2. I think I might have found him! On Ancestry & Find My Past, there are entries for Alec Wallace and Alexander Crichton Wallace, saying he was born on 2 Dec 1920 and died on 12 August 2004. Well, he was credited as Alec Wallace in 1960 and played a pensioner in a 1989 episode of Grange Hill.

    ReplyDelete

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