Friday, July 25, 2014

Underworld

The Doctor (Tom Baker) shows his
artistic side to Leela (Louise Jameson)
Four episodes (Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four)
First broadcast Jan 7 to 28 1978
Average audience for serial: 9.65m

CAST

Tom Baker (The Doctor) Born Jan 20 1934
Doctor Who credits
Played: The Doctor in Robot, The Ark in Space, The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, Planet of Evil, Pyramids of Mars, The Android Invasion, The Brain of Morbius, The Seeds of Doom, The Masque of Mandragora, The Hand of Fear, The Deadly Assassin, The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang, Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers, Underworld, The Invasion of Time, The Ribos Operation, The Pirate Planet, The Stones of Blood, The Androids of Tara, The Power of Kroll, The Armageddon Factor, Destiny of the Daleks, City of Death, The Creature from the Pit, Nightmare of Eden, The Horns of Nimon, Shada (unbroadcast), The Leisure Hive, Meglos, Full Circle, State of Decay, Warriors' Gate, The Keeper of Traken, Logopolis (1974-81). Return appearances in The Five Doctors (1983, archive footage), Dimensions in Time (1993), The Day of the Doctor (2013, as The Curator - but I think we all know who he was really!).
Tom also played the Doctor in the 1975 audio story Doctor Who and the Pescatons, and in several BBC and Big Finish audios since 2009.
Played: Meglos in Meglos (1980)
Career highlights
Tom's career began with a 1968 adaptation of The Winter's Tale, followed by roles in George and the Dragon (1968), Z Cars (1968), Softly Softly (1970), Nicholas and Alexandra (1971), The Canterbury Tales (1972), The Vault of Horror (1973), The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973), The Mutations (1974), Piccadilly Circus (1977), Late Night Story (1978), The Book Tower (1979-81), The Curse of King Tut's Tomb (1980), The Hound of the Baskervilles (1982, as Sherlock Holmes), Jemima Shore Investigates (1983), Remington Steele (1984), Blackadder II (1986), Roland Rat: The Series (1986), The Kenny Everett Television Show (1986), The Life and Loves of a She-Devil (1986), The Silver Chair (1990), Selling Hitler (1991), The Law Lord (1992), Cluedo (1992), Backtime (1998), Max Bear (2000), Dungeons and Dragons (2000), Fun at the Funeral Parlour (2001), Strange (2003), Fort Boyard (2003), Swiss Toni (2003), The Magic Roundabout (2005), Agatha Christie's Marple (2007), The Beeps (2007-08) and The Genie in the Bottle (2010). Tom has also had regular roles as Prof Geoffrey Hoyt in Medics (1992-95), Professor Wyvern in Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased) (2000-01) and Donald MacDonald in Monarch of the Glen (2004-05). He is probably most famous in his latter career for providing the eccentric narration for sketch series Little Britain between 2003-08.
Facts
Tom left home at 15 to become a monk with the Brothers of Ploermel on Jersey, but abandoned this profession at the age of 21 in favour of National Service. In 1971 Tom was nominated for two Golden Globe Awards for his portrayal of Rasputin in Nicholas and Alexandra (he was beaten by Ben Johnson and Desi Arnaz Jr). In December 1980 he married actress Lalla Ward (who had been companion Romana in Doctor Who since 1979), but the marriage ended 18 months later. He married third wife Sue Jerrard in 1986, previously an assistant editor on Doctor Who. Tom's old drinking buddies in the 1960s and 70s included artist Francis Bacon at the infamous Colony Room. Tom has several links to popular music - appearing on Technocat's single Only Human (1995), and providing a monologue on Witness to a Murder (Part Two) by Mansun (1998 - his Doctor and the TARDIS also appeared on the cover of the band's album Six). Pop band The Human League released a song entitled Tom Baker in 1980. In 1999 Tom published a short fairytale novel called The Boy Who Kicked Pigs, which has since been adapted for the stage. Tom's distinctive vocals can also be heard at various tourist attractions in the UK, such as the London Dungeon, Natural History Museum and Alton Towers' Nemesis ride. In 2006 Tom recorded 11,593 phrases so his voice could be used for BT's text messaging service to raise money for homeless charity Shelter - as a result record producer Mark Murphy created a single of Tom "singing" You Really Got Me by the Kinks.

Louise Jameson (Leela) Born Apr 20 1951
Doctor Who credits
Played: Leela in The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang, Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers, Underworld, The Invasion of Time (1977-78). Return appearance in Dimensions in Time (1993)
Career highlights
Louise made her screen debut in a 1971 adaptation of Tom Brown's Schooldays, and then took roles in Cider with Rosie (1971), Disciple of Death (1972), Emmerdale Farm (1973), Space: 1999 (1975), The Peddler (1976), Dominic (1976), The Gentle Touch (1984), The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Age 13¾ (1985), The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole (1987), Molly (1994), Wycliffe (1995), The Upper Hand (1996), River City (2008), Doc Martin (2011), Holby City (2012) and The Tractate Middoth (2013). She has had a number of regular roles over the years, including Dr Anne Reynolds in The Omega Factor (1979), Blanche Simmons in Tenko (1981-82), Susan Young in Bergerac (1985-90), Janet in Rides (1992-93) and Rosa Di Marco in soap EastEnders (1998-2000).
Facts
Louise was persuaded to become an actress when she was working as a prison visitor and met Leslie Grantham, then serving 12 years for manslaughter but later to become famous as EastEnders' Den Watts (and who was also in Resurrection of the Daleks in 1984).

John Leeson (Voice of K-9) Born Mar 16 1943
Doctor Who credits
Played: Voice of K-9 in The Invisible Enemy (1977), The Sun Makers (1977), Underworld (1978), The Invasion of Time (1978), The Ribos Operation (1978), The Pirate Planet (1978), The Stones of Blood (1978), The Androids of Tara (1978), The Armageddon Factor (1979), The Leisure Hive (1980), Meglos (1980), Full Circle (1980), State of Decay (1980), Warriors' Gate (1981), The Five Doctors (1983), Dimensions in Time (1993), School Reunion (2006), Journey's End (2008).
John has also voiced K-9 in Doctor Who's spin-offs, including K9 & Company: A Girl's Best Friend (1981), The Sarah Jane Adventures stories Invasion of the Bane (2006), The Lost Boy (2007), the Comic Relief special From Raxacoricofallapatorius with Love (2009), The Mad Woman in the Attic (2009), The Wedding of Sarah Jane Smith (2009), Mona Lisa's Revenge (2009), The Gift (2009), The Nightmare Man (2010) and Goodbye, Sarah Jane Smith (2010), and the K9 TV series stories Regeneration, Liberation, The Korven The Bounty Hunter, Siren of Ceres, Fear Itself, The Fall of the House of Gryffen, Jaws of Orthrus, Dream-eaters, Curse of Anubis, Oroborus, Alien Avatar, Aeolian, The Last Oak Tree in England, Black Hunger, The Cambridge Spy, Lost Library of UKKO, Mutant Copper, The Custodians, Taphony and the Time Loop, Robot Gladiators, Mind Snap, Angel of the North, The Last Precinct, Hound of the Korven, Eclipse of the Korven (2009-10). John has also voiced K9 in Search Out Space (1991), the BBC1 animated audio Shada (2003), on various episodes of Blue Peter (1977/2006), The Weakest Link (2007), Comic Relief (2009), Pointless (2013) and Stargazing Live: Back to Earth (2013-14), as well as in Big Finish audios since 2003.
Played: Voice of the Nucleus of the Swarm in The Invisible Enemy (1977)
Played: Dugeen in The Power of Kroll (1978-79)
Played: Voice of the Dalek battle computer in Remembrance of the Daleks (1988)
Career highlights
John's acting career began with The Spanish Farm in 1968, followed by roles in Dad's Army (1969), My Wife Next Door (1972), Headmaster (1977), Jigsaw (1979), Tarka the Otter (1979), Blake's 7 (1978/79), Sorry! (1981), Tucker's Luck (1985), Whoops Apocalypse (1986), 'Allo 'Allo (1989), The Bill (1993), Bugs (1995), Vanity Fair (1998), Doctors (2001), ChuckleVision (2007) and Rebels Without a Clue (2009). He also voiced Bungle in 50 episodes of children's programme Rainbow in the 1970s.
Facts
In the 70s John was a question writer for quiz show Mastermind. He is also a good chef, having prepared period feasts for Agatha Christie's Poirot (1993), been a wine consultant to five-star restaurant staff, and was a serving magistrate in Ealing, and adviser on court etiquette and procedures to film and TV. In 2002 John stood (under his birth name of John Ducker) as a Liberal Democrat candidate in the Ealing Council elections for the Perivale constituency (he got 326 votes, finishing in last place unelected). He stood again in 2010, attracting 1,104 votes, finishing seventh out of nine. His wife is Judy Ducker, a property buyer on productions such as Hugo, Snow White and the Huntsman and Diana.

James Maxwell (Jackson) Mar 23 1929 to Aug 18 1995
Career highlights
American-born James made his screen debut in Julius Caesar (1949), followed by roles in productions such as Othello (1955), Twelfth Night (1957), The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus (1959), Danton's Death (1959), Antigone (1959), Design for Loving (1962), Private Potter (1962), The Evil of Frankenstein (1964), The Hidden Truth (1964), An Enemy of the State (1965), The Power Game (1965-66), The Avengers (1964/67), The Portrait of a Lady (1968), Frontier (1968), Manhunt (1970), Doomwatch (1971), The Shadow of the Tower (1972), Hadleigh (1973), Raffles (1975), Oppenheimer (1980), Bognor (1981), Bergerac (1987) and Doctor Finlay (1994).
Facts
James was married to actress Avril Elgar and in 1976 was a founding member and artistic director (from 1977-94) of the Manchester Royal Exchange Theatre Company - and according to the supernatural entertainment programme Most Haunted (2006), his spirit haunts the theatre!

Alan Lake (Herrick) Nov 24 1940 to Oct 10 1984 (suicide)
Career highlights
Alan debuted in 1964's The Midnight Men, after which he found roles in Cluff (1965), Orlando (1966), Charlie Bubbles (1967), The Avengers (1966/68), A Bit of Crucifixion, Father (1968), The Contenders (1969), Layout for 5 Models (1972), It's Not the Size that Counts (1974), The Amorous Milkman (1975), The Playbirds (1978), Confessions from the David Galaxy Affair (1979), Blake's 7 (1980), Hart to Hart (1983), Don't Open Till Christmas (1984) and Lytton's Diary (1985).
Facts
Alan - who between 1970-71 served 12 months of an 18 month prison sentence for his involvement in a pub brawl - was married to British film star Diana Dors between 1968 and her death, and with whom he had a son, Jason Dors Lake. In 1970 he recorded a cover of Harry Nilsson's Good Times as a single. In 1972 Alan fell off a horse and broke his back, and for a time it was thought he would be confined to a wheelchair for the rest of his life (he was actually on his feet again within three weeks!). The pain from his recovery drove Alan to drink and he began hallucinating and suffering psychotic episodes. He managed to kick the addiction thanks to Roman Catholicism, but fell off the wagon again in 1975 when Diana Dors miscarried. When Diana died of cancer in May 1984, Alan became depressed, and on October 10, after dropping Jason off at the railway station, he went home and shot himself in the head. It was 16 years to the day since he and Diana had first met on the set of The Inquisitors. Alan's friend, the actor Lionel Jeffries, once claimed Alan killed himself because he had developed a brain tumour. Dors apparently hid away what she claimed to be over £2m in banks across Europe. In 1982, she gave her son Mark Dawson a sheet of paper, on which was a code that would reveal the whereabouts of the money. Alan Lake supposedly had the key that would crack the code, but as he had committed suicide, Dawson was left with an apparently unsolvable code - one which still hasn't been fully cracked to this day.

Jonathan Newth (Orfe) Born Mar 6 1939
Career highlights
Jonathan's earliest role was uncredited in Carry On Spying (1964), followed by Emergency Ward 10 (1964), Coronation Street (1967), The Man in the Iron Mask (1968), The Six Wives of Henry VIII (1970), Ace of Wands (1971), Pretenders (1972), Napoleon and Love (1974), Notorious Woman (1974), Poldark (1975), An Englishman's Castle (1978), The Squad (1980), The Nightmare Man (1981), The Day of the Triffids (1981), Champions (1984), Tenko (1981/84), Great Expectations (1991), Casualty (1996), Bugs (1997) and The Lost Honour (2014). Regular roles include Nicholas Fox in The Brothers (1973-74), Roger Powell in Triangle (1982) and Russell Bryant in sitcom After Henry (1988-92).

Imogen Bickford-Smith (Tala) Born 1952
Career highlights
Imogen's other work includes Jubilee (1977), Fawlty Towers (1979), Minder (1980), CATS Eyes (1985) and A Fish Called Wanda (1988).
Facts
At the time that Underworld was aired, Imogen's agent rather naughtily began touting the actress as Louise Jameson's replacement as the Doctor's companion. She wasn't.

James Marcus (Rask) Born Jun 23 1942
Doctor Who credits
Played: Peasant in Invasion of the Dinosaurs (1974)
Played: Rask in Underworld (1978)
Career highlights
James debuted in Hello, Good Evening and Welcome (1968), and later The Virgin Soldiers (1969), A Clockwork Orange (1971), The Chinese Puzzle (1974), The Naked Civil Servant (1975), Let's Get Laid (1978), Grandad (1980-84, as Bert Bamford), McVicar (1980), The Chinese Detective (1981), Mitch (1984), King of the Ghetto (1986), Pulaski (1987), Dodgem (1991), Woof! (1992/95), Lovejoy (1993), Heartbeat (1995) and The Last Detective (2005). He also played series regular Sidney Tate in London's Burning (1986-90) and wrote and directed the Ray Winstone film Tank Malling (1989).
Facts
Mega-trivia: James's sister-in-law is also actor Roy Marsden's sister-in-law.

Godfrey James (Tarn) Born Apr 16 1931
Career highlights
Prolific Godfrey's CV begins with The Avengers (1961) and takes in Out of this World (1962), The Amorous Mr Prawn (1962), Seance on a Wet Afternoon (1964), The Forsyte Saga (1967), Witchfinder General (1968), The Oblong Box (1969), Department S (1969), Cry of the Banshee (1970), UFO (1970), Trial (1971), Menace (1973), The Lotus Eaters (1973), The Terracotta Horse (1973), The Boy with Two Heads (1974), At the Earth's Core (1976), The Basil Brush Show (1977), Kidnapped (1978), The Aphrodite Inheritance (1979), Turtle's Progress (1980), In Loving Memory (1982), Hart to Hart (1984), The Tripods (1985), Oliver Twist (1985), Gems (1988), Maigret (1992), The Good Guys (1993), Chris Cross (1995), Leapin' Leprachauns! (1995), Crime Traveller (1997) and The Infinite World of HG Wells (2001).

Jimmy Gardner (Idmon) Aug 24 1924 to May 3 2010
Doctor Who credits
Played: Chenchu in Marco Polo (1964)
Played: Idmon in Underworld (1979)
Career highlights
Jimmy first appeared in Tyger's Hart (1954), then Stranger in the City (1962), The Curse of the Mummy's Tomb (1964), The Elusive Pimpernel (1969), 10 Rillington Place (1971), The XYY Man (1977), Coronation Street (1978), The Company of Wolves (1984), Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves (1991), Martin Chuzzlewit (1994), My Hero (2002), Finding Neverland (2004) and Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo (2005). He played Ernie Prang, driver of the Knight Bus, in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (2004).
Facts
His father Teddy was a jockey and came second in the 1923 Epsom Derby.

Norman Tipton (Idas)
Career highlights
Norman's other work includes Angels (1976), Blake's 7 (1978), Horse in the House (1979), Two Up, Two Down (1979), Shoestring (1980) and The Last Song (1981/83).

Jay Neill (Klimt) May 21 1932 to Jun 14 2006
Doctor Who credits
Played: Guard in The Enemy of the World (1967-68, uncredited)
Played: Policeman in Doctor Who and the Silurians (1970, uncredited)
Played: Pikeman in The Masque of Mandragora (1976)
Played: Silvey in The Invisible Enemy (1977)
Played: Klimt in Underworld (1978)
Career highlights
Jay's career began in Softly Softly (1968), then The First Lady (1969), Trial (1971), Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em (1973), Not on Your Nellie (1975), Fawlty Towers (1975), The Emigrants (1976), Edward and Mrs Simpson (1978), The Dick Emery Show (1979), Yes, Minister (1981), Terry and June (1982), Sorry! (1985) and Kit Curran (1986).
Facts
Between 1958-63 Jay was a member of the Dior Dancers variety act, which specialised in apache/ adagio aerobatic dance and reached great success, including in Las Vegas and at the 1960 Royal Variety Performance.

Frank Jarvis (Ankh) May 13 1941 to Sep 15 2010
Doctor Who credits
Played: Corporal in The War Machines (1966)
Played: Ankh in Underworld (1978)
Played: Skart in The Power of Kroll (1978-79)
Career highlights
Frank's extensive career began in 1962's Mix Me a Person, then That Kind of Girl (1963), Adam Adamant Lives! (1966), Z Cars (1967), The Italian Job (1969), Callan (1972), The Brothers (1974), Poldark (1975), Warship (1976-77, as Burnett), Grange Hill (1978), The Professionals (1978/79), Juliet Bravo (1981), Jenny's War (1985), Lovejoy (1992), EastEnders (2000), Catterick (2004), The Penalty King (2006) and Dear Father (2009).
Facts
The theme tune to The Italian Job, Self Preservation Society aka Get a Bloomin' Move On, was played at Frank's funeral.

Richard Shaw (Lakh) Nov 19 1920 to Apr 11 2010
Doctor Who credits
Played: Lobos in The Space Museum (1965)
Played: Cross in Frontier in Space (1973)
Played: Lakh in Underworld (1978)
Career highlights
Richard's career began uncredited in Johnny Comes Flying Home (1946) and included roles in Black Orchid (1953), Man from Tangier (1957), Quatermass and the Pit (1958), Sir Francis Drake (1962), 633 Squadron (1964), Carry On Don't Lose Your Head (1966), Market in Honey Lane (1968-69), The Onedin Line (1976), The Sandbaggers (1978), Coronation Street (1980), Matlock (1987) and Young Toscanini (1988). He regularly played Ryan in Freewheelers (1971).
Facts
In interview, Richard said: "Bill Hartnell was a long standing friend and we had worked together many times. When I played Lobos I sustained a severe blow to my left eye which caused some problems for the first episodes but we had to carry on." Two years after Richard's death, someone called Sven posted this credulity-stretching comment on Toby Hadoke's obituary for him (did Richard really believe in alien lizards and UFOs?).

Stacey Tendeter (Naia) Jun 21 1949 to Oct 26 2008 (breast cancer)
Career highlights
Stacey debuted in Uncle Vanya (1970) and then took roles in Two English Girls (1971), Spyder's Web (1972), The Pallisers (1974), Boy Dominic (1976), Prisoners of Conscience (1981), Jury (1983), Run for the Lifeboat (1988) and The Bill (1994).

Christine Pollon (Voice of the Oracle) 1927 to Aug 2012
Career highlights
Debuted in Sixpenny Corner as Grete Edler (1955-56), then Dead Giveaway (1957), How Green Was My Valley (1960), Romeo and Juliet (1962), Compact (1963-64), The Doctors (1971), Two Women (1973), Moody and Pegg (1975), The Duchess of Duke Street (1976-77), Together (1981), Angels (1981), The District Nurse (1987), She-Wolf of London (1990) and Dandelion Dead (1994).
Facts
Christine was married to actor Donald Hewlett, but in the early 1950s was the subject of an infatuation by British comedian Ronnie Barker.

CREW

Bob Baker (writer) Born Jul 26 1939
Doctor Who credits
Wrote: The Claws of Axos (1971), The Mutants (1972), The Three Doctors (1972-73), The Sontaran Experiment (1975), The Hand of Fear (1976), The Invisible Enemy (1977), Underworld (1978), The Armageddon Factor (1979), Nightmare of Eden (1979)
Career highlights
With writing partner Dave Martin, Bob wrote eight Doctor Who serials, and a ninth on his own. Bob's writing career began with Doctor Who, followed by stints on Thick as Thieves (1971), Pretenders (1972), Arthur of the Britons (1972), Z Cars (1974), Public Eye (1975), Sky (1976), Machinegunner (1976), King of the Castle (1977), Follow Me (1977), Scorpion Tales (1978), Target (1977-78), Shoestring (1979), Into the Labyrinth (1981-82), Jangles (1982), Bergerac (1981/83), Call Me Mister (1986), Succubus (1987), The Jazz Detective (1992), Kipper (1997) and The Mysti Show (2004). As co-creator of the Doctor's robot dog K9, Bob was also series producer and one of the writers of the 2009 spin-off series K9. In recent years he has enjoyed international success as writer of the Wallace and Gromit Aardman animations, including The Wrong Trousers (1993), A Close Shave (1995), The Curse of the Were-Rabbit (2005), A Matter of Loaf and Death (2008, for which he won a BAFTA and an Alexander Korda Award) and Wallace and Gromit's World of Invention (2010, which he also produced). Bob also acted as script editor on Pretenders, Shoestring, Jangles, Into the Labyrinth, Call Me Mister and Peace One Day (2004), and was producer on Function Room (2004).
Facts
The character of Baker Bob in A Matter of Loaf and death is named after Bob. Bob also helped create some of the animations for the BBC children's series Vision On in the late 1960s.

Dave Martin (writer) Jan 1 1935 to Mar 30 2007 (lung cancer)
Doctor Who credits
Wrote: The Claws of Axos (1971), The Mutants (1972), The Three Doctors (1972-73), The Sontaran Experiment (1975), The Hand of Fear (1976), The Invisible Enemy (1977), Underworld (1978), The Armageddon Factor (1979)
Career highlights
With writing partner Bob Baker, Dave wrote eight Doctor Who serials. Dave's writing career began with Doctor Who, followed by stints on Thick as Thieves (1971), Pretenders (1972), Arthur of the Britons (1972), Z Cars (1974), Late Night Drama (1974), Public Eye (1975), Sky (1976), Machinegunner (1976), King of the Castle (1977), Follow Me (1977), Scorpion Tales (1978), Target (1977-78), Into the Labyrinth (1981-82) and Succubus (1987). He was also story editor, along with Bob Baker, on Pretenders. Dave also wrote a 1986 Doctor Who choose your own adventure book, entitled Search for the Doctor, featuring several of his previous inventions, including K9, Omega and Drax.
Facts
His second wife Celia was the daughter of prolific TV script writer Denis Constanduros.

Norman Stewart (director)
Doctor Who credits
Production assistant: The Daleks (1963-64), Planet of Giants (1964), The Web Planet (1965), The Savages (1966), The Underwater Menace (1967), Day of the Daleks (1972), The Invisible Enemy (1977)
Directed: Underworld (1978), The Power of Kroll (1978-79)
Career highlights
Norman also directed episodes of The Omega Factor (1979), but this strand of his CV was short-lived and he returned to being a production manager on series such as Bergerac (1983-84) and Tenko (1984) (it's spooky how his credits tend to be series featuring Louise Jameson!). It is known that Norman has died.

Graham Williams (producer) May 24 1945 to Aug 17 1990 (shooting incident)
Doctor Who credits
Produced: Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers, Underworld, The Invasion of Time, The Ribos Operation, The Pirate Planet, The Stones of Blood, The Androids of Tara, The Power of Kroll, The Armageddon Factor, Destiny of the Daleks, City of Death, The Creature from the Pit, Nightmare of Eden, The Horns of Nimon, Shada (unbroadcast) (1977-80)
Wrote: The Invasion of Time (1978, as David Agnew), City of Death (1979, as David Agnew)
Career highlights
Graham wrote for Target (1977), was script editor on The View from Daniel Pike (1971-73), Sutherland's Law (1973), Barlow at Large (1975) and Z Cars (1975-77), and produced Super Gran (1986-87).
Facts
In 1985 Graham helped design the text computer game Doctor Who and the Warlord. In 1986 Graham pitched a script for Doctor Who's 23rd season, The Nightmare Fair, but when the programme was put on hiatus for 18 months, he eventually wrote the story as a novel in 1989. It was adapted as an audio adventure featuring Colin Baker and Nicola Bryant in 2009. At the time of his death Graham was running the Hartnoll Hotel in Tiverton, Devon. It is commonly believed that Graham may have accidentally shot himself while cleaning his firearm, although there is another, unsubstantiated, rumour that he may have committed suicide.

Anthony Read (script editor) Apr 21 1935 to Nov 21 2015 (cancer)
Doctor Who credits
Script edited: Image of the Fendahl (uncredited), The Sun Makers (uncredited), Underworld, The Invasion of Time, The Ribos Operation, The Pirate Planet, The Stones of Blood, The Androids of Tara, The Power of Kroll, The Armageddon Factor (1977-79)
Wrote: The Invasion of Time (1978, as David Agnew), The Horns of Nimon (1979-80)
Career highlights
Anthony's writing career began with episodes of Detective in 1962, followed by stints on This Man Craig (1967), Sherlock Holmes (1967), Mogul (1966-70), The Black Arrow (1974-75), Z Cars (1976-77), The Omega Factor (1979), Into the Labyrinth (1980), Sapphire and Steel (1981), the Chocky trilogy (1984-86), The Chief (1995), Heartbeat (1998) and Revelations (2002-03). He also acted as script editor on many of these series, as well as Hammer House of Horror (1980), and was producer on Mogul, The Lotus Eaters (1972) and The Dragon's Opponent (1973).
Facts
In later years Anthony has become an author and historian, concentrating on World War Two, often teaming up with Doctor Who colleague David Fisher, as well as writing prose based on his 1980s series The Baker Street Boys.
In 2015 Toby Hadoke released his Who's Round interview with Anthony here.

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