Monday, August 18, 2014

Nightmare of Eden

Looks like this Mandrel needs a bib
Four episodes (Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four)
First broadcast Nov 24 to Dec 15 1979
Average audience for serial: 9.33m

CAST

Tom Baker (The Doctor) Born Jan 20 1934
Doctor Who credits
Played: The Doctor in Robot, The Ark in Space, The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, Planet of Evil, Pyramids of Mars, The Android Invasion, The Brain of Morbius, The Seeds of Doom, The Masque of Mandragora, The Hand of Fear, The Deadly Assassin, The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang, Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers, Underworld, The Invasion of Time, The Ribos Operation, The Pirate Planet, The Stones of Blood, The Androids of Tara, The Power of Kroll, The Armageddon Factor, Destiny of the Daleks, City of Death, The Creature from the Pit, Nightmare of Eden, The Horns of Nimon, Shada (unbroadcast), The Leisure Hive, Meglos, Full Circle, State of Decay, Warriors' Gate, The Keeper of Traken, Logopolis (1974-81). Return appearances in The Five Doctors (1983, archive footage), Dimensions in Time (1993), The Day of the Doctor (2013, as The Curator - but I think we all know who he was really!).
Tom also played the Doctor in the 1975 audio story Doctor Who and the Pescatons, and in several BBC and Big Finish audios since 2009.
Played: Meglos in Meglos (1980)
Career highlights
Tom's career began with a 1968 adaptation of The Winter's Tale, followed by roles in George and the Dragon (1968), Z Cars (1968), Softly Softly (1970), Nicholas and Alexandra (1971), The Canterbury Tales (1972), The Vault of Horror (1973), The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973), The Mutations (1974), Piccadilly Circus (1977), Late Night Story (1978), The Book Tower (1979-81), The Curse of King Tut's Tomb (1980), The Hound of the Baskervilles (1982, as Sherlock Holmes), Jemima Shore Investigates (1983), Remington Steele (1984), Blackadder II (1986), Roland Rat: The Series (1986), The Kenny Everett Television Show (1986), The Life and Loves of a She-Devil (1986), The Silver Chair (1990), Selling Hitler (1991), The Law Lord (1992), Cluedo (1992), Backtime (1998), Max Bear (2000), Dungeons and Dragons (2000), Fun at the Funeral Parlour (2001), Strange (2003), Fort Boyard (2003), Swiss Toni (2003), The Magic Roundabout (2005), Agatha Christie's Marple (2007), The Beeps (2007-08) and The Genie in the Bottle (2010). Tom has also had regular roles as Prof Geoffrey Hoyt in Medics (1992-95), Professor Wyvern in Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased) (2000-01) and Donald MacDonald in Monarch of the Glen (2004-05). He is probably most famous in his latter career for providing the eccentric narration for sketch series Little Britain between 2003-08.
Facts
Tom left home at 15 to become a monk with the Brothers of Ploermel on Jersey, but abandoned this profession at the age of 21 in favour of National Service. In 1971 Tom was nominated for two Golden Globe Awards for his portrayal of Rasputin in Nicholas and Alexandra (he was beaten by Ben Johnson and Desi Arnaz Jr). In December 1980 he married actress Lalla Ward (who had been companion Romana in Doctor Who since 1979), but the marriage ended 18 months later. He married third wife Sue Jerrard in 1986, previously an assistant editor on Doctor Who. Tom's old drinking buddies in the 1960s and 70s included artist Francis Bacon at the infamous Colony Room. Tom has several links to popular music - appearing on Technocat's single Only Human (1995), and providing a monologue on Witness to a Murder (Part Two) by Mansun (1998 - his Doctor and the TARDIS also appeared on the cover of the band's album Six). Pop band The Human League released a song entitled Tom Baker in 1980. In 1999 Tom published a short fairytale novel called The Boy Who Kicked Pigs, which has since been adapted for the stage. Tom's distinctive vocals can also be heard at various tourist attractions in the UK, such as the London Dungeon, Natural History Museum and Alton Towers' Nemesis ride. In 2006 Tom recorded 11,593 phrases so his voice could be used for BT's text messaging service to raise money for homeless charity Shelter - as a result record producer Mark Murphy created a single of Tom "singing" You Really Got Me by the Kinks.

Lalla Ward (Romana) Born Jun 28 1951
Doctor Who credits
Played: Princess Astra in The Armageddon Factor (1979)
Played: Romana in Destiny of the Daleks, City of Death, The Creature from the Pit, Nightmare of Eden, The Horns of Nimon, Shada (unbroadcast), The Leisure Hive, Meglos, Full Circle, State of Decay, Warriors' Gate (1979-81). Return appearances in The Five Doctors (1983) and Dimensions in Time (1993). Lalla has also reprised the role for various audio plays since 2000.
Career highlights
Lalla's earliest acting credit was in Dr Finlay's Casebook (1969), then Vampire Circus (1972), Shelley (1972), The Upper Crusts (1973), England Made Me (1973), Rosebud (1975), Quiller (1975), The Ash Tree (1975), The Duchess of Duke Street (1977), The Professionals (1978), Hamlet, Prince of Denmark (1980), Schoolgirl Chums (1982) and Riviera (1987).
Facts
Lalla, whose real name is the Honourable Sarah Ward as she is the daughter of Edward Ward, the seventh Viscount Bangor, married Tom Baker on December 13 1980, but divorced him in April 1982. Her second husband since September 1992 has been controversial biologist Dr Richard Dawkins, who is most famous for his theories debunking religion and exploring the possibilities of evolution, particularly in the book The God Delusion. The two met at the 40th birthday party of one-time Doctor Who script editor/ writer Douglas Adams in March 1992. Of course, this means that both of Lalla's husbands have appeared in Doctor Who as Richard enjoyed a cameo as himself in The Stolen Earth (2008). In 1974 Lalla appeared in a film called Got It Made (aka Sweet Virgin), which the makers later re-released with added sex scenes performed by other actors. Lalla won a libel action against Club International magazine after it ran stills from the film claiming them to be of her. Since quitting acting she has written and painted for various children's books, as well as her husband's biology books. Lalla's forebears include George Plantagenet, brother of King Edward IV, and scientist Mary Ward, who has the dubious honour of being the first person in the world to die in a car accident, in 1869. In 1985/87 Lalla wrote and illustrated two knitting books, Beastly Knits and Fowl Knits, and various patterns were modelled by Lalla in the book. Lalla's father was a BBC war correspondent during World War Two, while her mother was a writer and BBC producer (she committed suicide in July 1991). Lalla has a main-belt asteroid named after her (8347 Lallaward) following its discovery in April 1987.

David Brierly (Voice of K-9) 1935 to Jun 10 2008 (cancer)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Voice of K-9 in The Creature from the Pit, Nightmare of Eden, The Horns of Nimon (1979-80). He also recorded extra dialogue for the 1992 VHS release of the unbroadcast Shada
Career highlights
David's earliest acting credit was on Noddy in Toyland (1957) voicing Jinky, followed by The Voodoo Factor (1959), Emergency Ward 10 (1960), Harpers West One (1961), Calculated Risk (1963), The Valiant Varneys (1964), The Flying Swan (1965), Sex Through the Ages (1974), Escort Girls (1975), Adventures of a Taxi Driver (1976), Frankie Howerd Strikes Again (1981), Threads (1984), One By One (1985), The Tripods (1985) and Howards' Way (1986). He also narrated the 1978 series Planet Water, and provided the voice for K-9 during an appearance on children's show Blue Peter in 1979.
Facts
David was an expert sailor, long-distance runner and keen fell walker.

Lewis Fiander (Tryst) Jan 12 1938 to May 24 2016 (stroke)
Career highlights
Australian Lewis debuted in Miss Mabel 91958), then The Password is Courage (1962), Redcap (1966), Pride and Prejudice (1967), I Start Counting (1969), Smith (1970), Dr Jekyll and Sister Hyde (1971), Dr Phibes Rises Again (1972), The Liver Birds (1974), Notorious Woman (1974), If There Weren't Any Blacks, You'd Have to Invent Them (1976), Island of the Damned (1976), The Sweeney (1976), Target (1978), Ladykillers (1980-81), That Beryl Marston...! (1981), Young Sherlock: The Mystery of the Manor House (1982), Poor Little Rich Girls (1984), The Doctor and the Devils (1985), Lytton's Diary (1985-86), Tanamera - Lion of Singapore (1989), Bangkok Hilton (1989), The Feds (1993), The Genie from Down Under (1996), Halifax FP (1997) and the Oscar-nominated The Mysterious Geographic Explorations of Jasper Morello (2005).
Facts
Lewis moved from Melbourne to London in the early 1960s and was a prolific performer on both the British and Australian stage in dramatic and musical roles (he returned to Australia in the 1980s).

Geoffrey Bateman (Dymond)
Career highlights
Geoffrey's first role was in Public Eye (1973), and then Dead Cert (1974), Coronation Street (1976), The New Avengers (1976), The Legend of King Arthur (1979), Miracles Take Longer (1984), Lovejoy (1986), Pulaski (1987), Eurocops (1988), Making News (1990), House of Cards (1990), Emmerdale (1994), Buffalo Girls (1995), Highlander (1997), Vatel (2000), Manderlay (2005), The Avignon Prophecy (2007), The Whistleblowers (2007) and Happiness Never Comes Alone (2012). Geoffrey might best be remembered as James Hooperman in This Life (1996-97).
Facts
Now living in Paris, Geoffrey has appeared in many French language films, and his distinctive tones are also used in a number of video games, including Dark Messiah of Might and Magic (2006).

David Daker (Captain Rigg) Born Sep 29 1935
Doctor Who credits
Played: Irongron in The Time Warrior (1973-74)
Played: Rigg in Nightmare of Eden (1979)
Career highlights
David's first credit was in Detective (1964), after which his prolific career took in King of the River (1966), Parkin's Patch (1970), Trial (1971), Villains (1972), Hadleigh (1973), The Black Windmill (1974), Stardust (1974), Daft as a Brush (1975), Aces High (1976), Porridge (1977), Rising Damp (1977), Holocaust (1978), Two People (1979), Time Bandits (1981), Britannia Hospital (1982), Only Fools and Horses (1982), Give Us a Break (1983), Hallelujah! (1983-84), The Woman in Black (1989), I Bought a Vampire Motorcycle (1990), The Vet (1996), Dangerfield (1997), Hearts and Bones (2001), The Last Detective (2004) and Holby City (2004/09). David has also enjoyed a number of running roles, as PC Culshaw in Z Cars (1967-68), Captain Spiker in Dick Turpin (1979-82), Gordon Lewis in Coronation Street (1981-85), Ben Campbell in Crown Prosecutor (1995) and Harry Crawford in Boon (1986-95).

Barry Andrews (Stott) Born 1944
Career highlights
Barry's debut was in a 1968 ITV Playhouse, after which he appeared in Dracula Has Risen from the Grave (1968), The Saint (1969), The Blood on Satan's Claw (1971), Rentadick (1972), I'm Not Feeling Myself Tonight (1976), The Spy Who Loved Me (1977), The XYY Man (1977), Two's Company (1979), Harry's Game (1982) and The Bill (1989/93).
Facts
In 1993 Barry's then 16-year-old son Eyjolfur was sentenced to life imprisonment for murdering Amaranath Bandaratilleka during a robbery at a newsagent's in Hammersmith, London. In 2001 Eyjolfur's sentence was reduced so that he became eligible for parole in 2002 due to the forgiveness of the victim's family, and the progress he'd made in prison.

Jennifer Lonsdale (Della) Born Jul 17 1953
Career highlights
Jennifer had first appeared in Further Up Pompeii (1975), and her CV also includes roles in Are You Being Served? (1977), The XYY Man (1977), Come Back Mrs Noah (1977-78), Love in a Cold Climate (1980) and Kelly Monteith (1982). She had long-running roles as Anne Bourne in The Cedar Tree (1976), and Angie Price in sitcom That's My Boy (1981-86).
Facts
Jennifer - now with the surname Coombs - has an appreciation group on Facebook!

Geoffrey Hinsliff (Fisk) Born 1937
Doctor Who credits
Played: Jack Tyler in Image of the Fendahl (1977)
Played: Fisk in Nightmare of Eden (1979)
Career highlights
Geoffrey's earliest role was in Suspense (1963), later taking roles in Cluff (1965), Adam Adamant Lives! (1966), A Family at War (1970), The Dragon's Opponent (1973), Couples (1976), Striker (1975-76), I, Claudius (1976), Accident (1978), Angels (1983), First Among Equals (1986), CATS Eyes (1987), Hetty Wainthropp Investigates (1998) and Heartbeat (2003). He will forever be remembered for his regular roles as George Fairchild in the comedy drama Brass (1983-84) and especially as Don Brennan in soap Coronation Street (1987-97).

Peter Craze (Costa) Born Aug 27 1946
Doctor Who credits
Played: Dako in The Space Museum (1965)
Played: Du Pont in The War Games (1969)
Played: Costa in Nightmare of Eden (1979)
Career highlights
Peter, who is the younger brother of actor Michael Craze (who played Doctor Who companion Ben Jackson), debuted in Probation Officer (1962), followed by Martin Chuzzlewit (1964), If There Weren't Any Blacks You'd Have to Invent Them (1968), The Beast in the Cellar (1970), My Old Man (1975), The Professionals (1978), Blake's 7 (1978/81), Bergerac (1983), The Dreamstone (1990), EastEnders (1998), Dangerous Parking (2007) and Limbo (2012). He also regularly played Kevin Barford in the soap United! (1965).
Facts
Peter went on to become a drama teacher, and was Principal of Drama Studio London between 2003-2012 and is now Artistic Consultant. His wife is actor Illona Linthwaite.

Stephen Jenn (Secker) Mar 30 1950 to Feb 26 2012 (brain tumour)
Career highlights
After debuting in Marked Personal in 1974, Stephen moved on to roles in Blake's 7 (1980), To Serve Them All My Days (1980), The Keep (1983), Space (1985), Castaway (1986), The Dog It Was That Died (1989), The Rainbow Thief (1990), 99-1 (1995), Oktober (1998), Ticks (1999), Cleopatra (1999) and Offending Angels (2000).

Richard Barnes (Crewman)
Career highlights
Richard's CV also has entries for Count Dracula (1977), Orion (1979), Tales of the Unexpected (1980/81) and The Winds of War (1983).

Sebastian Stride (Crewman)
Career highlights
Sebastian's only other credits were for The Citadel (1983) and The Return of Sherlock Holmes (1988). Here he is, singing I'll Never Be the Same in 2010!

Eden Phillips (Crewman) Born Jul 11 1949
Career highlights
Eden's other work includes Crown Court (1972), Potter's Picture Palace (1976-78), Shortland Street (1996) and Five Good Reasons (2008). Eden later made over 1,500 appearances as Narrator in the musical Joseph and His Amazing Technicolour Dreamcoat before becoming a popular children's lyricist, writing well over 100 different songs, and also writing a number of musical adaptations, such as Alfie: The Musical and Love in a Cold Climate.

Annette Peters (Passenger)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Extra in Invasion of the Dinosaurs (1974, uncredited)
Played: Passenger in Nightmare of Eden (1979)
Career highlights
Annette also appeared in Within These Walls (1975), Fawlty Towers (1975), The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin (1976), Bless Me Father (1978),  The Jewel in the Crown (1984), 1919 (1985) and Keeping Up Appearances (1991).

Lionel Sansby (Passenger) Jul 14 1938 to Mar 30 1983
Doctor Who credits
Played: UNIT soldier in Doctor Who and the Silurians (1970, uncredited)
Played: Passenger in Nightmare of Eden (1979)
Played: Krarg in Shada (1980, unbroadcast, uncredited)
Played: Man in market in Snakedance (1983, uncredited)
Career highlights
Lionel's other roles were in Doomwatch (1971),Villains (1972), Blake's 7 (1978), Funny Man (1981) and The Home Front (1983).

Peter Roberts (Passenger)
His only other credit was The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin (1978).

Maggie Petersen (Passenger)
Career highlights
Maggie's other credits include Public Eye (1971), Marquis de Sade's Justine (1977), The Old Curiosity Shop (1979) and A Little Silver Trumpet (1980).

CREW

Bob Baker (writer) Born Jul 26 1939
Doctor Who credits
Wrote: The Claws of Axos (1971), The Mutants (1972), The Three Doctors (1972-73), The Sontaran Experiment (1975), The Hand of Fear (1976), The Invisible Enemy (1977), Underworld (1978), The Armageddon Factor (1979), Nightmare of Eden (1979)
Career highlights
With writing partner Dave Martin, Bob wrote eight Doctor Who serials, and a ninth on his own. Bob's writing career began with Doctor Who, followed by stints on Thick as Thieves (1971), Pretenders (1972), Arthur of the Britons (1972), Z Cars (1974), Public Eye (1975), Sky (1976), Machinegunner (1976), King of the Castle (1977), Follow Me (1977), Scorpion Tales (1978), Target (1977-78), Shoestring (1979), Into the Labyrinth (1981-82), Jangles (1982), Bergerac (1981/83), Call Me Mister (1986), Succubus (1987), The Jazz Detective (1992), Kipper (1997) and The Mysti Show (2004). As co-creator of the Doctor's robot dog K9, Bob was also series producer and one of the writers of the 2009 spin-off series K9. In recent years he has enjoyed international success as writer of the Wallace and Gromit Aardman animations, including The Wrong Trousers (1993), A Close Shave (1995), The Curse of the Were-Rabbit (2005), A Matter of Loaf and Death (2008, for which he won a BAFTA and an Alexander Korda Award) and Wallace and Gromit's World of Invention (2010, which he also produced). Bob also acted as script editor on Pretenders, Shoestring, Jangles, Into the Labyrinth, Call Me Mister and Peace One Day (2004), and was producer on Function Room (2004).
Facts
The character of Baker Bob in A Matter of Loaf and death is named after Bob. Bob also helped create some of the animations for the BBC children's series Vision On in the late 1960s.
In 2017 Toby Hadoke released his Who's Round interview with Bob here.

Alan Bromly (director) Sep 13 1915 to Sep 1995
Doctor Who credits
Directed: The Time Warrior (1973-74), Nightmare of Eden (1979)
Career highlights
Alan started out as an actor in productions such as The Queen's Husband (1946), The Railway Children (1951) and The Long Chase (1972), but he soon moved behind the camera to direct At Your Service Ltd (1951), Panorama (1953-54, including its first ever edition), The Other Man (1956), Little Women (1958), The Scarf (1959), The World of Tim Frazer (1960), Suspense (1962), A Man Called Harry Brent (1965), The Big M (1967), Crown Court (1972), Great Mysteries (1973), Crossroads (1977-78) and Coronation Street (1976-80). It was as a producer that he became most successful, on series such as Parent-Craft (1951), Little Women (1958), Compact (1962), Legend of Death (1965), Watch the Birdies (1966), This Way for Murder (1967), Paul Temple (1969) and Out of the Unknown (1969-71). He had also been a radio commentator since World War Two.
Facts
Alan directed Nightmare of Eden when in semi-retirement (at the age of 65), but the technical demands - along with Tom Baker's "demanding" personality - seemed beyond him, and producer Graham Williams replaced him as director for the story's final recording day.

Graham Williams (producer) May 24 1945 to Aug 17 1990 (shooting incident)
Doctor Who credits
Produced: Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers, Underworld, The Invasion of Time, The Ribos Operation, The Pirate Planet, The Stones of Blood, The Androids of Tara, The Power of Kroll, The Armageddon Factor, Destiny of the Daleks, City of Death, The Creature from the Pit, Nightmare of Eden, The Horns of Nimon, Shada (unbroadcast) (1977-80)
Wrote: The Invasion of Time (1978, as David Agnew), City of Death (1979, as David Agnew)
Career highlights
Graham wrote for Target (1977), was script editor on The View from Daniel Pike (1971-73), Sutherland's Law (1973), Barlow at Large (1975) and Z Cars (1975-77), and produced Super Gran (1986-87).
Facts
In 1985 Graham helped design the text computer game Doctor Who and the Warlord. In 1986 Graham pitched a script for Doctor Who's 23rd season, The Nightmare Fair, but when the programme was put on hiatus for 18 months, he eventually wrote the story as a novel in 1989. It was adapted as an audio adventure featuring Colin Baker and Nicola Bryant in 2009. At the time of his death Graham was running the Hartnoll Hotel in Tiverton, Devon. It is commonly believed that Graham may have accidentally shot himself while cleaning his firearm, although there is another, unsubstantiated, rumour that he may have committed suicide.

Douglas Adams (script editor) Mar 11 1952 to May 11 2001 (heart attack)
Doctor Who credits
Wrote: The Pirate Planet (1978), City of Death (1979, as David Agnew), Shada (1980, unbroadcast)
Script edited: Destiny of the Daleks, City of Death, The Creature from the Pit, Nightmare of Eden, The Horns of Nimon, Shada (1979-80)
Career highlights
Douglas is most famous for writing the BBC radio series The Hitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy in 1978, which then became a series of books (1979-92), a TV series (1981), a film (2005), a stage play, a computer game and even a bath towel. Douglas's first TV writing was for Monty Python's Flying Circus (1974), followed by Out of the Trees (1976), Doctor on the Go (1977), Doctor Snuggles (1979), Not the Nine O'Clock News (1979) and Hyperland (1990). He also made appearances in front of the camera in Monty Python's Flying Circus, Out of the Trees, The Hitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy and Rockstar (2000).
Facts
Douglas, who was heavily involved in computer technology, created the Digital Village/ h2g2, and inspired the online encyclopedia Babelfish. It was Douglas who popularised the now commonly accepted belief that 42 is the answer to life, the universe and everything. He owned the first two Apple Macintosh computers ever in the UK. Douglas also wrote the Dirk Gently series of novels, and a short-lived TV series of the same name based on them was made by the BBC 2010/12. Further trivia... Douglas helped come up with the title for Pink Floyd's 1994 album The Division Bell... He was part of the team that originally founded the UK charity Comic Relief in 1985... There are asteroids named after both Douglas and his Hitch Hikers "hero" Arthurdent... Towel Day is celebrated every year on May 25 by fans as a tribute to Douglas, on which people carry a towel around with them all day because "a towel is about the most massively useful thing an interstellar hitchhiker can have", according to his multi-million selling book!

2 comments:

  1. Hi, many thanks for posting the link to the Jennifer Lonsdale Appreciation Society on Facebook, which I set up and manage. It's nice to receive an unexpected namecheck and it might hopefully send some much-needed traffic our way.

    Just a query - where did you obtain Jennifer's d.o.b? I've searched fruitlessly for it for as long as I can remember!

    Best wishes
    Ian Coulson

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Ian, nice to hear from you. A contact of mine who has access to various ancestry research sites provided it. It might be worth searching under the name Jennifer Coombs on the various ancestry sites, if you're a member.

      Delete

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