Wednesday, December 17, 2014

The Trial of a Time Lord Parts 13-14 (aka The Ultimate Foe)

The Sixth Doctor (Colin Baker) gets
that sinking feeling you have when you
get to the end of a season and wonder
if you'll get another one...
Two episodes (of a total of 14) (Part Thirteen, Part Fourteen)
First broadcast Nov 29 to Dec 6 1986
Average audience for serial: 5.0m

CAST

Colin Baker (The Doctor) Born Jun 8 1943
Doctor Who credits
Played: Maxil in Arc of Infinity (1983)
Played: The Doctor in The Caves of Androzani, The Twin Dilemma, Attack of the Cybermen, Vengeance on Varos, The Mark of the Rani, The Two Doctors, Timelash, Revelation of the Daleks, The Trial of a Time Lord (1984-86). Return appearance in Dimensions in Time (1993). Colin also played the Doctor in the radio play Slipback (1985), the Jim'll Fix It sketch A Fix with Sontarans (1985) and the stage play The Ultimate Adventure (1989)
Career highlights
Colin made his debut in The Adventures of Don Quick (1970), followed by Roads to Freedom (1970), Cousin Bette (1971), The Moonstone (1972), The Carnforth Practice (1974), Doctors and Nurses (1979), Blake's 7 (1980), Juliet Bravo (1982), The Citadel (1983), Swallows and Amazons Forever! (1984), The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles (1993), Harry's Mad (1995), The Famous Five (1997), Jonathan Creek (1997), The Knock (1997), Sunburn (1999), Dangerfield (1999), Hollyoaks (2000), Your Mother Should Know (2006), Kingdom (2009), Hustle (2010), Shadows of a Stranger (2014) and The Mild Bunch (2015). He also enjoyed great success as the villainous Paul Merroney in The Brothers (1974-76), and in 2012 took part in I'm a Celebrity, Get Me Out of Here! (finishing eighth out of 12). Colin appeared in numerous fan spin-off videos through the 1990s, and since 1999 has been playing his Doctor in Big Finish's audio adventures.
Facts
Colin's first wife was the actress Liza Goddard, who appeared in Terminus (1983). Shortly before Colin took the role of the Doctor, he and his second wife Marion suffered the loss of their baby son Jack to cot death syndrome. Colin subsequently became a passionate fundraiser for the Foundation for the Study of Infant Deaths, with many of his personal appearance fees being donated to the charity. Colin was the roommate of David Troughton, son of Second Doctor Patrick, during the 1960s and later became his best man. Colin has been writing a regular column for his local newspaper the Bucks Free Press since 1995. Here he is, on Twitter!

Bonnie Langford (Melanie Bush) Born Jul 22 1964
Doctor Who credits
Played: Melanie Bush in The Trial of a Time Lord Parts 9-14, Time and the Rani, Paradise Towers, Delta and the Bannermen, Dragonfire (1986-87). Return appearance in Dimensions in Time (1993)
Career highlights
Starting out as a child star on series such as Junior Showtime (1973), Bonnie's earliest major role was in the film Bugsy Malone (1976), after which she had her first taste of true fame playing Violet Elizabeth Bott in Just William (1977-78). Further acting credits include Wombling Free: The Movie (1977), Family Album (1991), Goodnight Sweetheart (1999), Agatha Christie's Marple (2006) and Hotel Babylon (2008). She has also made a niche for herself as a dancer, entertainer and presenter on programmes such as The Hot Shoe Show (1983-84), Saturday Starship (1984-85) and Dancing on Ice (2006, in which she came third, competing with Matt Evers; and 2014, in which she came eighth, competing with Andrei Lipanov). She has also played Mel in various fan audio adventures since 2000.
Facts
In 1970 Bonnie won Hughie Green's talent show Opportunity Knocks. Much of her career since the 1990s has been spent on stage, on Broadway and in the West End. In 1995 Bonnie married actor Paul Grunert, at the time best known for his appearances in the National Lottery TV commercials. Bonnie's sister Cherida is married to actor and manager Sandy Strallen, making Bonnie the aunt of actresses Scarlett, Zizi and Summer Strallen. Her mother founded Babette Langford's The Young Set. Here she is, on Twitter!

Michael Jayston (The Valeyard) Born Oct 29 1935
Career highlights
Michael appeared as the Valeyard in all 14 episodes of The Trial of a Time Lord. Michael's earliest role was in Suspense in 1962 (as "Intense Young Man"!), after which he appeared in The Power Game (1969), Solo (1970), Cromwell (1970), Macbeth (1970), Nicholas and Alexandra (1971), Mr Rolls and Mr Royce (1972), Jane Eyre (1973), The Internecine Project (1974), Quiller (1975), Zulu Dawn (1979), Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy (1979), Flesh and Blood (1980), Man of Letters (1984), Big Deal (1985), Still Crazy Like a Fox (1987), About Face (1989), A Bit of a Do (1989), Haggard (1990), Cluedo (1991), The Darling Buds of May (1993), Outside Edge (1995-96), Only Fools and Horses (1996), Heartburn Hotel (1998), EastEnders (2002), The Royal (2003-04/07), Albert's Memorial (2009), Tracy Beaker Returns (2011), Borgia (2014) and The Man Who Choked (2014). He also played Donald De Souza in over 80 episodes of soap Emmerdale (2007-08). Michael has reprised the role of the Valeyard twice for Big Finish audios: in 2003's He Jests at Scars... and 2013's The Trial of the Valeyard.

Lynda Bellingham (The Inquisitor) May 31 1948 to Oct 19 2014 (colon cancer)
Career highlights
Lynda appeared as the Inquisitor in all 14 episodes of The Trial of a Time Lord. Born in Canada, Lynda's acting debut came with The Misfit (1971), followed by Kate (1971), A Family at War (1971), Tell Tarby (1973), A Little Bit of Wisdom (1974), The Sweeney (1975), Confessions of a Driving Instructor (1976), Doctor on the Go (1977), The Fuzz (1977), The Pink Medicine Show (1978), Mackenzie (1980), Blake's 7 (1981), Educating Marmalade (1982), Martin Chuzzlewit (1994), Reach for the Moon (2000), My Uncle Silas (2001), Devil's Gate (2003), Odd Socks (2004), Bonkers (2007), Robin Hood (2007), Mister Eleven (2009) and Too Close for Comfort (2012/14). Lynda also had recurring roles as Nurse Hilda Price in General Hospital (1972-73), Helen Herriot in All Creatures Great and Small (1988-90), Pauline Farnell in At Home with the Braithwaites (2000-03) and Irene Radford in The Bill (2004). She also played Faith Grayshot in her own sitcom, Second Thoughts (1991-94) and its spin-off Faith in the Future (1995-98), and between 2007-2011 was a regular on the lunchtime discussion show Loose Women. In 2009 she was a contestant on Strictly Come Dancing, and was voted out in the fourth week.
Facts
One thing Lynda was associated with which irked her in later years was the Oxo television commercials, in which she played the mother of a family who viewers got to see grow up and develop over the course of 16 years, between 1983-99. Lynda's first husband was producer and director Greg Smith, while her son Michael Peluso also became an actor. Lynda, who was awarded an OBE for services to charitable giving in 2014, was diagnosed with colorectal cancer in 2013 and at first was given a positive prognosis, but the cancer spread to her liver and lungs and in September 2014 announced she intended to cease treatment so that she could enjoy one last Christmas with her family before dying early in 2015. Sadly, her last wish was not to be. Just weeks before her death, she published her autobiography, There's Something I'm Dying to Tell You.
In 2014, two days after her death, Toby Hadoke released his Who's Round interview with Lynda here.
This is Your Life: Lynda was the subject of Thames TV's This is Your Life on January 27th, 1993, surprised by host Michael Aspel on set for the sitcom Second Thoughts. Four Doctor Who actors paid tribute to her on the show - Nickolas Grace, Gareth Hunt, Peter Davison and Colin Baker, as well as director Peter Moffatt. Link to The Big Red Book entry.

Tony Selby (Glitz) Born Feb 26 1938
Doctor Who credits
Played: Sabalom Glitz in The Trial of a Time Lord Parts 1-4 & 13-14 (1986), Dragonfire (1987)
Career highlights
Tony debuted in 1955's An Alligator Named Daisy, after which he took roles in An Age of Kings (1960), Teletale (1964), Alfie (1966), King of the River (1966), Poor Cow (1967), The Informer (1967), The Avengers (1968), Witchfinder General (1968), According to Dora (1969), Shine a Light (1970), Catweazle (1971), Villain (1971), Ace of Wands (1970-71), Warship (1973), Reg Varney (1974), Moody and Pegg (1974-75), The Good Life (1975-76), Superman (1978), Jack of Diamonds (1983), Give Us a Break (1983-84), Hideaway (1986), The Secret Garden (1987), The World of Lee Evans (1995), Loop (1997), Holby City (1999), Burnside (2000), EastEnders (2002), Dream Team (2006), My Family (2011) and Cockneys vs Zombies (2012). Tony also regularly played Corporal Percy Marsh in Get Some In! (1975-78), Bert in Mulberry (1992-93), Max Taplow in Love Hurts (1992-94) and Sergeant Nozzer Richardson in The Detectives (1994-97). He was nominated for a 1997 Laurence Olivier Theatre Award for Best Supporting in a Musical of 1996 for his role in Paint Your Wagon.

Anthony Ainley (The Master) Aug 20 1932 to May 3 2004 (cancer)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Tremas in The Keeper of Traken (1981)
Played: The Master in The Keeper of Traken (1981), Logopolis (1981), Castrovalva (1982), Time-Flight (1982), The King's Demons (1983), The Five Doctors (1983), Planet of Fire (1984), The Mark of the Rani (1985), The Trial of a Time Lord (1986), Survival (1989) - as well as a brief cameo in The Caves of Androzani (1984), and the BBC computer game Destiny of the Doctors (1997).
Career highlights
Anthony's earliest role was aged 10 in The Foreman Went to France (1942), followed by roles in It's Dark Outside (1965), Exorcism at Midnight (1966), Champion House (1967), Inspector Clouseau (1968), The Avengers (1968), Joanna (1968), Oh! What a Lovely War (1968), Department S (1970), The Blood on Satan's Claw (1971), In the Devil's Garden (1971), Elizabeth R (1971), The Adventurer (1972), Spyder's Web (1972, as regular Clive Hawksworth), Upstairs, Downstairs (1973), The Pallisers (1974), The Land That Time Forgot (1975), Nicholas Nickleby (1977), The Devil's Crown (1978), Mackenzie (1980) and The Boy Who Won the Pools (1983).
Facts
Anthony's brother was actor Richard Ainley and his father was silent film star Henry Ainley. Anthony adored cricket (he was a member of the London Theatres' Cricket Club). Anthony shared his birthdate with Seventh Doctor Sylvester McCoy and Ace actress Sophie Aldred (August 20th). Before his acting career took off, he was well known as a rugby player in London, playing under the name of A A Holmes (his mother's surname). For several seasons in the 1960s he played regularly for Richmond and Middlesex.

James Bree (Keeper of the Matrix) Jul 20 1923 to Dec 1 2008
Doctor Who credits
Played: Security Chief in The War Games (1969)
Played: Nefred in Full Circle (1980)
Played: Keeper of the Matrix in The Trial of a Time Lord (1986)
Career highlights
James's earliest appearance was in What's in Store (1953), then Give Them a Ring (1954), Stage By Stage: The Relapse, or Virtue in Danger (1954), Just My Luck (1957), Probation Officer (1962), R3 (1965), The Prisoner (1968), On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969), On the Buses (1971), Ace of Wands (1972), The Donati Conspiracy (1973), I, Claudius (1976), Secret Army (1977), Rumpole of the Bailey (1979), The Jewel in the Crown (1984), Galloping Galaxies! (1985-86), Executive Stress (1986), Without a Clue (1988), Anna Lee (1994), Silent Witness (1996) and Ruth Rendell: The Orchard Walls (1998). James also appeared in the Doctor Who fan video spin-off Downtime (1995) and Lust in Space (1998, his final work).
Facts
He was a close friend of Doctor Who film actor Peter Cushing, and read a tribute out at his funeral. James suffered a stroke in 1998 which left him without the power of speech for the rest of his life. James was born as James Rutherfoord Worsfold Thomson, but became Thomson-Bree (just Bree professionally) after inheriting land from his great-uncle, Archdeacon William Bree. Through this inheritance, James became patron of the benefice and rectory of Allesley in Coventry. James's long-time partner, Albert Yates, died in 2006.

Geoffrey Hughes (Mr Popplewick) Feb 2 1944 to Jul 27 2012 (prostate cancer)
Career highlights
Geoffrey made his acting debut in The Likely Lads in 1966, after which he found work in The Bofors Gun (1968), Yellow Submarine (1968, as the voice of Paul McCartney), The Virgin Soldiers (1969), Curry and Chips (1969), Up Pompeii! (1970), Carry On at Your Convenience (1971), Dad's Army (1972), Crown Court (1974), Confessions of a Driving Instructor (1976), Nijinsky (1980), The Bright Side (1985), Flying Lady (1989), Spender (1991), The Upper Hand (1993), Flick (2008), Skins (2007-09) and The History of Stand-Up Comedy (2010). Geoffrey had four long-running roles which he will forever be remembered for: Eddie Yeats in over 70 episodes of soap Coronation Street (1974-83/87), Onslow in 44 episodes of sitcom Keeping Up Appearances (1990-95), Vernon Scripps in almost 90 episodes of Heartbeat (2001-07) and Twiggy in eight episodes of sitcom The Royle Family (1998-2008).
Facts
Geoffrey was first diagnosed with cancer in 1996 but beat it; sadly, it returned in 2010 and he had to give up acting. In 2009, he was appointed Deputy Lord Lieutenant for the Isle of Wight (where he lived), making him the official link between the island and royalty at formal engagements. He was also the Honorary Squire of the Dartington Morris Men and made an appearance at the Dartington Morris Ring meeting in 2008. His musical interests included English folk-rock, which led to him compering at Fairport Convention's annual Copredy festival several times.
This is Your Life: Geoffrey was the subject of BBC TV's This is Your Life on February 14th, 2001, surprised by host Michael Aspel during filming of the drama Heartbeat in Yorkshire.

CREW

Robert Holmes (writer - Part 13) Apr 2 1926 to May 24 1986 (chronic liver ailment)
Doctor Who credits
Wrote: The Krotons (1968-69), The Space Pirates (1969), Spearhead from Space (1970), Terror of the Autons (1971), Carnival of Monsters (1973), The Time Warrior (1973-74), The Ark in Space (1975), Pyramids of Mars (1975, uncredited), The Brain of Morbius (1976, uncredited), The Deadly Assassin (1976), The Talons of Weng-Chiang (1977), The Sun Makers (1977), The Ribos Operation (1978), The Power of Kroll (1978-79), The Caves of Androzani (1984), The Two Doctors (1985), The Trial of a Time Lord (1986)
Script edited: Robot, The Ark in Space (uncredited), The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, Planet of Evil, Pyramids of Mars, The Android Invasion, The Brain of Morbius, The Seeds of Doom, The Masque of Mandragora, The Hand of Fear, The Deadly Assassin (uncredited), The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang (uncredited), Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers (uncredited) (1974-78)
Career highlights
He began writing for TV as early as Knight Errant Limited (1960), and went on to write scripts for Deadline Midnight (1961), Ghost Squad (1962), Emergency Ward 10 (1962-63), Dr Finlay's Casebook (1964-65), Undermind (1965), No Hiding Place (1965-67), Public Eye (1965-68), Mr Rose (1967-68), Doomwatch (1971), Spyder's Web (1972), Dixon of Dock Green (1974), Jukes of Piccadilly (1980), The Nightmare Man (1981), Blake's 7 (1979/81), Into the Labyrinth (1981-82) and Bergerac (1983-87). He was also story editor on Armchair Thriller and Shoestring, both in 1980.
Facts
Robert was the youngest ever commissioned officer in the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, serving in Burma. After he left the Army he joined the police, then became a journalist and sports writer - he was the last ever editor of British lifestyle publication John Bull Magazine in 1964. He was originally going to write Doctor Who's 20th anniversary tale in 1983, but when he found the numerous elements he'd been asked to incorporate unworkable, he was replaced by Terrance Dicks. Robert died while writing the final two episodes of The Trial of a Time Lord, and due to tensions in the Doctor Who production office at the time, his original ending for the story had to be changed and written afresh by Pip and Jane Baker. His face was also one of those seen during the Time Lord mind battle in The Brain of Morbius.

Pip Baker (writer - Part 14)
Doctor Who credits
Wrote: The Mark of the Rani (1985), The Trial of a Time Lord (1986), Time and the Rani (1987)
Career highlights
As part of a highly successful husband and wife writing team, Pip co-wrote for The Pursuers (1961), The Third Alibi (1961), Dilemma (1962), Detective (1968), Captain Nemo and the Underwater City (1969), Circus (1975), Space: 1999 (1976), Z Cars (1976-77), Watt on Earth (1991-92) and The Last 28 (1999). Pip is also an accomplished playwright and novelist, co-writing Doctor Who novelisations of their TV stories, as well as a Choose Your Own Adventure book entitled Race Against Time (1986), which also featured the Rani. In 2000 Pip and Jane resurrected the Rani once more for the audio drama The Rani Reaps the Whirlwind.

Jane Baker (writer - Part 14) Died Sep 8 2014
Doctor Who credits
Wrote: The Mark of the Rani (1985), The Trial of a Time Lord (1986), Time and the Rani (1987)
Career highlights
As part of a highly successful husband and wife writing team, Jane co-wrote for The Pursuers (1961), The Third Alibi (1961), Dilemma (1962), Detective (1968), Captain Nemo and the Underwater City (1969), Circus (1975), Space: 1999 (1976), Z Cars (1976-77), Watt on Earth (1991-92) and The Last 28 (1999). Jane was also an accomplished playwright and novelist, co-writing Doctor Who novelisations of their TV stories, as well as a Choose Your Own Adventure book entitled Race Against Time (1986), which also featured the Rani. In 2000 Jane and Pip resurrected the Rani once more for the audio drama The Rani Reaps the Whirlwind.

Chris Clough (director) Born Mar 9 1951
Doctor Who credits
Directed: The Trial of a Time Lord Parts 9-14 (1986), Delta and the Bannermen (1987), Dragonfire (1987), The Happiness Patrol (1988), Silver Nemesis (1988)
Career highlights
Further directing work includes Brookside (1982), EastEnders (1985-88), Casualty (1994-95), The Bill (1992-95), Ballykissangel (1996) and Skins (2007). Chris later went into production, handling The Bill (1995-97), Ballykissangel (1998-99), Black Cab (2000), Table 12 (2001), Born and Bred (2003-04), The Ghost Squad (2005), Skins (2007-13), Sirens (2011), Strike Back (2012), Lucan (2013) and The Missing (2014).
Facts
In 2000 Chris won a Silver Spire at the San Francisco International Film Festival for his work on Ballykissangel.

John Nathan-Turner (producer and (uncredited) script editor - Part 14) Aug 12 1947 to May 1 2002 (liver failure)
Doctor Who credits
Floor assistant: The Space Pirates (1969, uncredited)
Assistant floor manager: The Ambassadors of Death (1970, uncredited), Colony in Space (1971, uncredited)
Production unit manager: Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers, Underworld, The Invasion of Time, The Ribos Operation, The Pirate Planet, The Stones of Blood, The Androids of Tara, The Power of Kroll, The Armageddon Factor, Destiny of the Daleks, City of Death, The Creature from the Pit, Nightmare of Eden, The Horns of Nimon, Shada (unbroadcast) (1977-80)
Produced: The Leisure Hive, Meglos, Full Circle, State of Decay, Warriors' Gate, The Keeper of Traken, Logopolis, K-9 & Company, Castrovalva, Four to Doomsday, Kinda, The Visitation, Black Orchid, Earthshock, Time-Flight, Arc of Infinity, Snakedance, Mawdryn Undead, Terminus, Enlightenment, The King's Demons, The Five Doctors, Warriors of the Deep, The Awakening, Frontios, Resurrection of the Daleks, Planet of Fire, The Caves of Androzani, The Twin Dilemma, Attack of the Cybermen, Vengeance on Varos, The Mark of the Rani, The Two Doctors, Timelash, Revelation of the Daleks, The Trial of a Time Lord, Time and the Rani, Paradise Towers, Delta and the Bannermen, Dragonfire, Remembrance of the Daleks, The Happiness Patrol, Silver Nemesis, The Greatest Show in the Galaxy, Battlefield, Ghost Light, The Curse of Fenric, Survival (1980-89), plus Dimensions in Time (1993)
Wrote: Dimensions in Time (1993)
Career highlights
John started out as an assistant floor manager on Doctor Who, and also worked as a production assistant on programmes such as The Pallisers (1974), Barlow (1975) and How Green Was My Valley (1975-76). He soon graduated to become production unit manager on Doctor Who, as well as on series such as All Creatures Great and Small (1978-80) and Flesh and Blood (1980). After Doctor Who was taken off air in 1989, John maintained his links to the series by producing a number of special video releases, such as The Years Tapes which included various single episodes from partly lost 1960s stories, as well as the 1992 release of Shada.
Facts
John's long-time partner was Gary Downie, who acted as production manager on some of the 1980s serials. In the 2013 book The Life and Scandalous Times of John Nathan-Turner, author Richard Marson alleges that John and partner Gary "preyed" sexually on young male teenage Doctor Who fans. The gay age of consent in the 1980s was 21.

Eric Saward (script editor - Part 13) Born Dec 9 1944
Doctor Who credits
Script edited: Castrovalva, Kinda, Black Orchid, Time-Flight, Arc of Infinity, Snakedance, Mawdryn Undead, Terminus, Enlightenment, The King's Demons, The Five Doctors, Warriors of the Deep, The Awakening, Frontios, Resurrection of the Daleks, Planet of Fire, The Caves of Androzani, The Twin Dilemma, Attack of the Cybermen, Vengeance on Varos, The Mark of the Rani, The Two Doctors, Timelash, Revelation of the Daleks, The Trial of a Time Lord (1982-86)
Wrote: The Visitation (1982), Earthshock (1983), Resurrection of the Daleks (1984), Attack of the Cybermen (1985, uncredited), Revelation of the Daleks (1985). He also wrote the BBC Radio story Slipback (1985), and the Jim'll Fix It sketch A Fix with Sontarans (1985)
Career highlights
In the 1960s Eric worked for a time as an estate agent before training to become an English teacher, but around 1975 decided to go into writing, and wrote a number of radio plays before being approached to get involved with Doctor Who. Since leaving the series (acrimoniously) in 1986, Eric has continued to write mainly radio scripts, often for German radio.

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