Thursday, September 04, 2014

Warriors' Gate

Romana (Lalla Ward) and K-9 (voiced by
John Leeson) say farewell, accompanied
by Biroc (David Weston)
Four episodes (Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four)
First broadcast Jan 3 to 24 1981
Average audience for serial: 7.48m

CAST

Tom Baker (The Doctor) Born Jan 20 1934
Doctor Who credits
Played: The Doctor in Robot, The Ark in Space, The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, Planet of Evil, Pyramids of Mars, The Android Invasion, The Brain of Morbius, The Seeds of Doom, The Masque of Mandragora, The Hand of Fear, The Deadly Assassin, The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang, Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers, Underworld, The Invasion of Time, The Ribos Operation, The Pirate Planet, The Stones of Blood, The Androids of Tara, The Power of Kroll, The Armageddon Factor, Destiny of the Daleks, City of Death, The Creature from the Pit, Nightmare of Eden, The Horns of Nimon, Shada (unbroadcast), The Leisure Hive, Meglos, Full Circle, State of Decay, Warriors' Gate, The Keeper of Traken, Logopolis (1974-81). Return appearances in The Five Doctors (1983, archive footage), Dimensions in Time (1993), The Day of the Doctor (2013, as The Curator - but I think we all know who he was really!).
Tom also played the Doctor in the 1975 audio story Doctor Who and the Pescatons, and in several BBC and Big Finish audios since 2009.
Played: Meglos in Meglos (1980)
Career highlights
Tom's career began with a 1968 adaptation of The Winter's Tale, followed by roles in George and the Dragon (1968), Z Cars (1968), Softly Softly (1970), Nicholas and Alexandra (1971), The Canterbury Tales (1972), The Vault of Horror (1973), The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973), The Mutations (1974), Piccadilly Circus (1977), Late Night Story (1978), The Book Tower (1979-81), The Curse of King Tut's Tomb (1980), The Hound of the Baskervilles (1982, as Sherlock Holmes), Jemima Shore Investigates (1983), Remington Steele (1984), Blackadder II (1986), Roland Rat: The Series (1986), The Kenny Everett Television Show (1986), The Life and Loves of a She-Devil (1986), The Silver Chair (1990), Selling Hitler (1991), The Law Lord (1992), Cluedo (1992), Backtime (1998), Max Bear (2000), Dungeons and Dragons (2000), Fun at the Funeral Parlour (2001), Strange (2003), Fort Boyard (2003), Swiss Toni (2003), The Magic Roundabout (2005), Agatha Christie's Marple (2007), The Beeps (2007-08) and The Genie in the Bottle (2010). Tom has also had regular roles as Prof Geoffrey Hoyt in Medics (1992-95), Professor Wyvern in Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased) (2000-01) and Donald MacDonald in Monarch of the Glen (2004-05). He is probably most famous in his latter career for providing the eccentric narration for sketch series Little Britain between 2003-08.
Facts
Tom left home at 15 to become a monk with the Brothers of Ploermel on Jersey, but abandoned this profession at the age of 21 in favour of National Service. In 1971 Tom was nominated for two Golden Globe Awards for his portrayal of Rasputin in Nicholas and Alexandra (he was beaten by Ben Johnson and Desi Arnaz Jr). In December 1980 he married actress Lalla Ward (who had been companion Romana in Doctor Who since 1979), but the marriage ended 18 months later. He married third wife Sue Jerrard in 1986, previously an assistant editor on Doctor Who. Tom's old drinking buddies in the 1960s and 70s included artist Francis Bacon at the infamous Colony Room. Tom has several links to popular music - appearing on Technocat's single Only Human (1995), and providing a monologue on Witness to a Murder (Part Two) by Mansun (1998 - his Doctor and the TARDIS also appeared on the cover of the band's album Six). Pop band The Human League released a song entitled Tom Baker in 1980. In 1999 Tom published a short fairytale novel called The Boy Who Kicked Pigs, which has since been adapted for the stage. Tom's distinctive vocals can also be heard at various tourist attractions in the UK, such as the London Dungeon, Natural History Museum and Alton Towers' Nemesis ride. In 2006 Tom recorded 11,593 phrases so his voice could be used for BT's text messaging service to raise money for homeless charity Shelter - as a result record producer Mark Murphy created a single of Tom "singing" You Really Got Me by the Kinks.

Lalla Ward (Romana) Born Jun 28 1951
Doctor Who credits
Played: Princess Astra in The Armageddon Factor (1979)
Played: Romana in Destiny of the Daleks, City of Death, The Creature from the Pit, Nightmare of Eden, The Horns of Nimon, Shada (unbroadcast), The Leisure Hive, Meglos, Full Circle, State of Decay, Warriors' Gate (1979-81). Return appearances in The Five Doctors (1983) and Dimensions in Time (1993). Lalla has also reprised the role for various audio plays since 2000.
Career highlights
Lalla's earliest acting credit was in Dr Finlay's Casebook (1969), then Vampire Circus (1972), Shelley (1972), The Upper Crusts (1973), England Made Me (1973), Rosebud (1975), Quiller (1975), The Ash Tree (1975), The Duchess of Duke Street (1977), The Professionals (1978), Hamlet, Prince of Denmark (1980), Schoolgirl Chums (1982) and Riviera (1987).
Facts
Lalla, whose real name is the Honourable Sarah Ward as she is the daughter of Edward Ward, the seventh Viscount Bangor, married Tom Baker on December 13 1980, but divorced him in April 1982. Her second husband since September 1992 has been controversial biologist Dr Richard Dawkins, who is most famous for his theories debunking religion and exploring the possibilities of evolution, particularly in the book The God Delusion. The two met at the 40th birthday party of one-time Doctor Who script editor/ writer Douglas Adams in March 1992. Of course, this means that both of Lalla's husbands have appeared in Doctor Who as Richard enjoyed a cameo as himself in The Stolen Earth (2008). In 1974 Lalla appeared in a film called Got It Made (aka Sweet Virgin), which the makers later re-released with added sex scenes performed by other actors. Lalla won a libel action against Club International magazine after it ran stills from the film claiming them to be of her. Since quitting acting she has written and painted for various children's books, as well as her husband's biology books. Lalla's forebears include George Plantagenet, brother of King Edward IV, and scientist Mary Ward, who has the dubious honour of being the first person in the world to die in a car accident, in 1869. In 1985/87 Lalla wrote and illustrated two knitting books, Beastly Knits and Fowl Knits, and various patterns were modelled by Lalla in the book. Lalla's father was a BBC war correspondent during World War Two, while her mother was a writer and BBC producer (she committed suicide in July 1991). Lalla has a main-belt asteroid named after her (8347 Lallaward) following its discovery in April 1987.

John Leeson (Voice of K-9) Born Mar 16 1943
Doctor Who credits
Played: Voice of K-9 in The Invisible Enemy (1977), The Sun Makers (1977), Underworld (1978), The Invasion of Time (1978), The Ribos Operation (1978), The Pirate Planet (1978), The Stones of Blood (1978), The Androids of Tara (1978), The Armageddon Factor (1979), The Leisure Hive (1980), Meglos (1980), Full Circle (1980), State of Decay (1980), Warriors' Gate (1981), The Five Doctors (1983), Dimensions in Time (1993), School Reunion (2006), Journey's End (2008).
John has also voiced K-9 in Doctor Who's spin-offs, including K9 & Company: A Girl's Best Friend (1981), The Sarah Jane Adventures stories Invasion of the Bane (2006), The Lost Boy (2007), the Comic Relief special From Raxacoricofallapatorius with Love (2009), The Mad Woman in the Attic (2009), The Wedding of Sarah Jane Smith (2009), Mona Lisa's Revenge (2009), The Gift (2009), The Nightmare Man (2010) and Goodbye, Sarah Jane Smith (2010), and the K9 TV series stories Regeneration, Liberation, The Korven The Bounty Hunter, Siren of Ceres, Fear Itself, The Fall of the House of Gryffen, Jaws of Orthrus, Dream-eaters, Curse of Anubis, Oroborus, Alien Avatar, Aeolian, The Last Oak Tree in England, Black Hunger, The Cambridge Spy, Lost Library of UKKO, Mutant Copper, The Custodians, Taphony and the Time Loop, Robot Gladiators, Mind Snap, Angel of the North, The Last Precinct, Hound of the Korven, Eclipse of the Korven (2009-10). John has also voiced K9 in Search Out Space (1991), the BBC1 animated audio Shada (2003), on various episodes of Blue Peter (1977/2006), The Weakest Link (2007), Comic Relief (2009), Pointless (2013) and Stargazing Live: Back to Earth (2013-14), as well as in Big Finish audios since 2003.
Played: Voice of the Nucleus of the Swarm in The Invisible Enemy (1977)
Played: Dugeen in The Power of Kroll (1978-79)
Played: Voice of the Dalek battle computer in Remembrance of the Daleks (1988)
Career highlights
John's acting career began with The Spanish Farm in 1968, followed by roles in Dad's Army (1969), My Wife Next Door (1972), Headmaster (1977), Jigsaw (1979), Tarka the Otter (1979), Blake's 7 (1978/79), Sorry! (1981), Tucker's Luck (1985), Whoops Apocalypse (1986), 'Allo 'Allo (1989), The Bill (1993), Bugs (1995), Vanity Fair (1998), Doctors (2001), ChuckleVision (2007) and Rebels Without a Clue (2009). He also voiced Bungle in 50 episodes of children's programme Rainbow in the 1970s.
Facts
In the 70s John was a question writer for quiz show Mastermind. He is also a good chef, having prepared period feasts for Agatha Christie's Poirot (1993), been a wine consultant to five-star restaurant staff, and was a serving magistrate in Ealing, and adviser on court etiquette and procedures to film and TV. In 2002 John stood (under his birth name of John Ducker) as a Liberal Democrat candidate in the Ealing Council elections for the Perivale constituency (he got 326 votes, finishing in last place unelected). He stood again in 2010, attracting 1,104 votes, finishing seventh out of nine. His wife is Judy Ducker, a property buyer on productions such as Hugo, Snow White and the Huntsman and Diana.

Matthew Waterhouse (Adric) Born Dec 19 1961
Doctor Who credits
Played: Adric in Full Circle, State of Decay, Warriors' Gate, The Keeper of Traken, Logopolis, Castrovalva, Four to Doomsday, Kinda, The Visitation, Black orchid, Earthshock, Time-Flight (1980-82). Return appearance in The Caves of Androzani (1984)
Career highlights
Matthew's only other TV work prior to Doctor Who was To Serve Them All My Days (1980), and after Doctor Who he pursued a career on the stage; in 2006 he self-published his debut novel, Fates, Flowers: A Comedy of New York, and has since written two more, as well as his autobiography Blue Box Boy (2010).
Facts
Matthew, who started at the BBC as a clerk in the news department, has lived in Connecticut, US, since 1998 with his partner, and since 2003 has also worked as a tour guide at the Mark Twain Museum, Hartford, Connecticut. He collects rare books by obscure mid-century poets. In 2014 Matthew appeared as Adric in a number of audio productions by Big Finish. Here he is on Twitter.

Clifford Rose (Rorvik) Born Oct 24 1929
Career highlights
Clifford's earliest acting credit was in Hilda Lessways (1959), followed by As You Like It (1963), Marat/ Sade (1967), Tell Me Lies (1968), Roads to Freedom (1970), Eyeless in Gaza (1971), Shelley (1972), Once Upon a Time (1973), The Pallisers (1974), The Madness (1976), Rooms (1977), Bergerac (1983), The Cold Room (1984), Fortunes of War (1987), GBH (1991), In Suspicious Circumstances (1996), Wallis and Edward (2005), Midsomer Murders (2010) and The Iron Lady (2011). Clifford's many recurring roles include Dr Snell in Callan (1969-72/74), Ludwig Kessler in both Secret Army (1977-79) and Kessler (1981), Charles Burton in Buccaneer (1980) and Challon in One By One (1985-87).
Facts
His brother was actor David Rose. Clifford retired from acting in 2013 after being diagnosed with advanced kidney failure.

Kenneth Cope (Packard) Born Apr 14 1931
Career highlights
Clifford's career on screen began with Impulse (1954), followed by roles in Patrol Car (1955), Billy Bunter of Greyfriars School (1955-56), X: The Unknown (1956), Dunkirk (1958), The Pleasure Lovers (1959), Jungle Street Girls (1960), Kipps (1960), These are the Damned (1963), Carry On Jack (1963), The Lance Percival Show (1965), Island of the Burning Damned (1967), We Have Ways of Making You Laugh (1968), Catweazle (1971), Carry On at Your Convenience (1971), Carry On Matron (1972), The Famous Five (1978), Strangers (1982), Rumpole of the Bailey (1987), Captives (1994), Medics (1995), Waking the Dead (2004), Hustle (2007) and The Royal Today (2008). His most memorable role will be as the late Marty Hopkirk in Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased) (1969-70), and other regular roles include Ray Hilton in Brookside (1999-2001) and Jed Stone in soap Coronation Street (1961-63/66/2008-09). Kenneth is also an established screenwriter, having penned for the likes of That Was the Week That Was (1962-63), For Amusement Only (1968), The Dustbinmen (1970), Striker (1975-76) and A Sharp Intake of Breath (1978).
Facts
Kenneth's wife is actress Renny Lister, while his daughter Martha appeared in Doctor Who as the Controller in Bad Wolf (2005). Their sons Nick and Mark Cope were members of the 1990s rock band the Candyskins. In 1963, thanks to his success in Coronation Street, Kenneth released a single with the Breakaways called Hands Off, Stop Muckin' About. It wasn't a hit, but it did lead to him getting a regular DJ slot on Radio Luxembourg. In 1974 Kenneth and Renny opened a restaurant in Oxfordshire called Martha's Kitchen, named after their daughter. Nine years later they bought a pub and named it Edward's, after their second son. In 2014 Clifford appeared in court as a character witness for Coronation Street co-star William Roache, who was accused (and subsequently acquitted) of rape and indecent assault. Kenneth, who now suffers from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, was diagnosed with incurable lung cancer in 2000, and was under the impression he did not have long to live. However, in 2003 a specialist hospital doctor discovered Kenneth had been misdiagnosed, and wrote to his GP to tell him - but the GP did not pass the information on, and Kenneth did not find out that he did not have cancer until 2006, when he questioned his medical records. He told the Daily Mail in 2009: "I spent six years of my life wrongly believing I had cancer, literally under a false death sentence because of a wrong diagnosis."

David Kincaid (Lane) Sep 18 1939 to May 12 2010
Career highlights
David's earliest role was in Dr Finlay's Casebook (1967), followed by Spy Trap (1972), Churchill's People (1975), Timon of Athens (1981), Taggart (1986), Baddiel's Syndrome (2001) and Perilous (2002).

Freddie Earlle (Aldo) May 24 1924 to Jul 7 2007
Career highlights
Debuting in Alfred Marks Time in 1959, Freddie's screen work includes The Plane Makers (1964), Virgin of the Secret Service (1968), Hullabaloo (1968), Hark at Barker (1969), Paul Temple (1970), Roads to Freedom (1970), Lovebox (1972), Clochemerle (1972), Sykes (1973), The Brothers (1975), I'm Not Feeling Myself Tonight (1976), Rob Roy (1977), Yanks Go Home (1976-77), Room Service (1979, in which he played a different character also called Aldo), The Basil Brush Show (1980), Robin's Nest (1981), Triangle (1982), The Paradise Club (1989), Bullseye! (1990) and Backup (1997). He also had a recurring role as Alasdair McCaig in Adam Smith (1972-73).
Facts
Freddie's career began as a music hall comedian and performer in the 1940s, often appearing with his first wife Freda Munday as the duo Mundy and Earl ("a boy, a girl and a gramophone"), sharing the bill with the likes of Frank Sinatra and Laurel and Hardy (here's a fantastic bill from Leicester's Palace Theatre which sees Freddie and Freda sharing the bill with comedian Max Miller, as well as the intriguing The Three Karloffs!). With the decline of the music halls Freddie took his family to live in a kibbutz in Israel, but the lure of the stage never left him, and he returned to the UK to take up acting. In 1998 he retired to Spain with his second wife.

Harry Waters (Royce) Mar 25 1947 to Mar 15 2002 (cancer)
Career highlights
Harry's other work includes Rasputin (1971), State of Emergency (1975), Shoestring (1979), Bergerac (1981), Lytton's Diary (1986) and The Bill (1991).

David Weston (Biroc) Born Jul 28 1938
Doctor Who credits
Played: Nicholas in The Massacre of St Bartholomew's Eve (1966)
Played: Biroc in Warriors' Gate (1981)
Career highlights
David first appeared in An Age of Kings (1960), then Tales of Mystery (1962), That Kind of Girl (1963), The Masque of the Red Death (1964), The Heroes of Telemark (1965), UFO (1971), The Tomorrow People (1973), Minder (1984), Lovejoy (1993), Barbara (1999), Doctors (2005) and King Lear (2008).
Facts
David is married to the actor Dora Reisser. In 2011 he wrote a book called Covering McKellen, all about being Ian McKellen's understudy, while in 2013 he published his first novel, The Further Adventures of the Artful Dodger.
In 2013 Toby Hadoke released his Who's Round interview with David here.

Vincent Pickering (Sagan)
Career highlights
Doctor Who was Vincent's debut role, after which he appeared in EastEnders (1986), Gentlemen and Players (1989), Prime Suspect (1991), Grange Hill (1991-92), Lovejoy (1993), Porkpie (1996), Highlander: The Raven (1999), Messiah (2001) and Gangs of New York (2002).

Robert Vowles (Gundan)
Career highlights
Robert debuted in Doctor on the Go (1975), then A Horseman Riding By (1978), The Nightmare Man (1981), Beau Geste (1982), CATS Eyes (1986), The Honesty in Dishonesty (2011) and Edward (2014).

Jeremy Gittins (Lazlo) Born Jan 30 1956
Career highlights
Jeremy's earliest work was in Callan (1974), followed by Keep It in the Family (1980), Wet Job (1981), Mitch (1984), Fresh Fields (1986), Andy Capp (1988), Blackadder Goes Forth (1989), Lazarus and Dingwall (1991), The Upper Hand (1995), EastEnders (2000), New Tricks (2004), Mile High (2005) and As You Like It (2011), but he may be most remembered as Michael the vicar in sitcom Keeping Up Appearances (1990-95).
Facts
Jeremy and his wife were also occasionally seen on the holiday programme Wish You Were Here in the 1990s. In 2014 he appeared in a TV commercial for Cadbury's Crispello.

CREW

Stephen Gallagher (writer) Born Oct 13 1954
Doctor Who credits
Wrote: Warriors' Gate (1981), Terminus (1983)
Career highlights
Stephen's first screen writing credit was on Doctor Who, after which he went on to great success with series such as Rockcliffe's Folly (1988), Chimera (1991, adapted from his own novel), Chiller (1995), Bugs (1995-97), Oktober (1988, from his own novel), Murder Rooms (2001), Rosemary and Thyme (2004-05), Eleventh Hour (2006 and its US 2008 version), Crusoe (2008-09), The Forgotten (2009-10) and Silent Witness (2013).
Facts
Stephen is also a prolific novelist, including The Last Rose of Summer (1978), Valley of Lights (1987), Red, Red Robin (1995), Out of His Mind (2004), Spirit Box (2005) and The Bedlam Detective (2012). He has occasionally written under the names John Lydecker (including his Doctor Who script novelisations), Stephen Couper and Lisa Todd.
In 2016 Toby Hadoke released his Who's Round interview with Stephen here.

Paul Joyce (director) Born Dec 27 1940
Career highlights
The vast majority of Paul's directing work has been in documentaries, beginning with shorts such as Barbarella City and Youth Wave in the late 1960s, and continuing in the 1980s with The Man Who Left His Soul on Film (1983), Tickets for the Titanic (1988), Motion and Emotion: The Films of Wim Wenders (1990), Sam Peckinpah: Man of Iron (1993), Marlon Brando: The Wild One (1996), Spielberg on Kubrick (1999), 2001: The Making of a Myth (2001), Hell on Earth (2002) and The Curious Case of Inspector Clouseau (2002). He has also written and produced many of the credits on his CV. In 1993 he appeared in an episode of The X-Files called Squeeze.
Facts
His film-making company is called Lucida Productions.
In 2016 Toby Hadoke released his Who's Round interview with Paul here.

John Nathan-Turner (producer) Aug 12 1947 to May 1 2002 (liver failure)
Doctor Who credits
Floor assistant: The Space Pirates (1969, uncredited)
Assistant floor manager: The Ambassadors of Death (1970, uncredited), Colony in Space (1971, uncredited)
Production unit manager: Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers, Underworld, The Invasion of Time, The Ribos Operation, The Pirate Planet, The Stones of Blood, The Androids of Tara, The Power of Kroll, The Armageddon Factor, Destiny of the Daleks, City of Death, The Creature from the Pit, Nightmare of Eden, The Horns of Nimon, Shada (unbroadcast) (1977-80)
Produced: The Leisure Hive, Meglos, Full Circle, State of Decay, Warriors' Gate, The Keeper of Traken, Logopolis, K-9 & Company, Castrovalva, Four to Doomsday, Kinda, The Visitation, Black Orchid, Earthshock, Time-Flight, Arc of Infinity, Snakedance, Mawdryn Undead, Terminus, Enlightenment, The King's Demons, The Five Doctors, Warriors of the Deep, The Awakening, Frontios, Resurrection of the Daleks, Planet of Fire, The Caves of Androzani, The Twin Dilemma, Attack of the Cybermen, Vengeance on Varos, The Mark of the Rani, The Two Doctors, Timelash, Revelation of the Daleks, The Trial of a Time Lord, Time and the Rani, Paradise Towers, Delta and the Bannermen, Dragonfire, Remembrance of the Daleks, The Happiness Patrol, Silver Nemesis, The Greatest Show in the Galaxy, Battlefield, Ghost Light, The Curse of Fenric, Survival (1980-89), plus Dimensions in Time (1993)
Wrote: Dimensions in Time (1993)
Career highlights
John started out as an assistant floor manager on Doctor Who, and also worked as a production assistant on programmes such as The Pallisers (1974), Barlow (1975) and How Green Was My Valley (1975-76). He soon graduated to become production unit manager on Doctor Who, as well as on series such as All Creatures Great and Small (1978-80) and Flesh and Blood (1980). After Doctor Who was taken off air in 1989, John maintained his links to the series by producing a number of special video releases, such as The Years Tapes which included various single episodes from partly lost 1960s stories, as well as the 1992 release of Shada.
Facts
John's long-time partner was Gary Downie, who acted as production manager on some of the 1980s serials. In the 2013 book The Life and Scandalous Times of John Nathan-Turner, author Richard Marson alleges that John and partner Gary "preyed" sexually on young male teenage Doctor Who fans. The gay age of consent in the 1980s was 21.

Barry Letts (executive producer) Mar 26 1925 to Oct 9 2009 (cancer)
Doctor Who credits
Directed: The Enemy of the World (1967-68), Inferno (1970, episodes 3-7 (studio), uncredited), Terror of the Autons (1971, uncredited), Carnival of Monsters (1973), Planet of the Spiders (1974), The Android Invasion (1975)
Played: Man in Doctor Who and the Silurians (1970, uncredited)
Played: Police radio voice in Planet of the Spiders (1974, uncredited)
Wrote: The Daemons (1971, as Guy Leopold), The Time Monster (1972, uncredited), The Green Death (1973, uncredited), Planet of the Spiders (1974, uncredited)
Produced: Doctor Who and the Silurians, The Ambassadors of Death, Inferno, Terror of the Autons, The Mind of Evil, The Claws of Axos, Colony in Space, The Daemons, Day of the Daleks, The Curse of Peladon, The Sea Devils, The Mutants, The Time Monster, The Three Doctors, Carnival of Monsters, Frontier in Space, Planet of the Daleks, The Green Death, The Time Warrior, Invasion of the Dinosaurs, Death to the Daleks, The Monster of Peladon, Planet of the Spiders (uncredited), Robot (1970-75)
Executive producer: The Leisure Hive, Meglos, Full Circle, State of Decay, Warriors' Gate, The Keeper of Traken, Logopolis (1980-81)
Barry also wrote two BBC Radio serials starring Jon Pertwee and Elisabeth Sladen - The Paradise of Death (1993) and The Ghosts of N-Space (1996).
Career highlights
Barry started out as an actor in San Demetrio London (1943), and also popped up in Scott of the Antarctic (1948), The Cruel Sea (1953), The Silver Sword (1957-58), The Black Arrow (1958), The Moonstone (1959), Coronation Street (1961), City Beneath the Sea (1962), The Avengers (1964), The Indian Tales of Rudyard Kipling (1964), Z Cars (1963-64/65), Softly Softly (1966), The Man Who Never Was (1966) and This Man Craig (1966). His directing career began with The Newcomers (1965), and also included Z Cars (1967-68), Adventure Weekly (1969), The Prince and the Pauper (1976), Gulliver in Lilliput (1982), Brookside (1982), David Copperfield (1986), Alice in Wonderland (1986) and EastEnders (1990-92). As a producer, he worked on and helped create Moonbase 3 (1973), Lorna Doone (1976), Katy (1976), Nicholas Nickleby (1977), The Children of the New Forest (1977), Sexton Blake and the Demon God (1978), Pinocchio (1978), The Old Curiosity Shop (1979-80), A Tale of Two Cities (1980), Sense and Sensibility (1981), Great Expectations (1981), The Hound of the Baskervilles (1982, starring Tom Baker), Dombey and Son (1983), Goodbye Mr Chips (1984), The Invisible Man (1984) and The Pickwick Papers (1985).
Facts
His sister was actress Pauline Letts, while his sons are actors Dominic and Crispin Letts. The 2009 Doctor Who story The Waters of Mars was dedicated to his memory.

Christopher H Bidmead (script editor) Born Jan 18 1941
Doctor Who credits
Script edited: The Leisure Hive, Meglos, Full Circle, State of Decay, Warriors' Gate, The Keeper of Traken, Logopolis (1980-81)
Wrote: Logopolis (1981), Castrovalva (1982), Frontios (1984)
Career highlights
Christopher originally trained as an actor and enjoyed roles in series such as Emergency Ward 10 and Waggoner's Walk. After that he moved into script writing, on series such as Harriet's Back in Town (1973) and Rooms (1975), and then started writing for scientific journals, something he continues to do, particularly on the magazines Wired and PC Plus.
Facts
The H stands for Hamilton. Here he is, on Twitter.

1 comment:

  1. DAVID KINCAID also played the shokeeper in the Yorkie "It's Not for Girls" advert (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LH2pLzdeCP0).

    ReplyDelete

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