Saturday, June 28, 2014

Terror of the Zygons

"Are you going to the fancy
dress party tonight?"
"Yes, who are you going as?"
Four episodes (Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four)
First broadcast Aug 30 to Sep 20 1975
Average audience for serial: 9.03m

CAST

Tom Baker (The Doctor) Born Jan 20 1934
Doctor Who credits
Played: The Doctor in Robot, The Ark in Space, The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, Planet of Evil, Pyramids of Mars, The Android Invasion, The Brain of Morbius, The Seeds of Doom, The Masque of Mandragora, The Hand of Fear, The Deadly Assassin, The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang, Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers, Underworld, The Invasion of Time, The Ribos Operation, The Pirate Planet, The Stones of Blood, The Androids of Tara, The Power of Kroll, The Armageddon Factor, Destiny of the Daleks, City of Death, The Creature from the Pit, Nightmare of Eden, The Horns of Nimon, Shada (unbroadcast), The Leisure Hive, Meglos, Full Circle, State of Decay, Warriors' Gate, The Keeper of Traken, Logopolis (1974-81). Return appearances in The Five Doctors (1983, archive footage), Dimensions in Time (1993), The Day of the Doctor (2013, as The Curator - but I think we all know who he was really!).
Tom also played the Doctor in the 1975 audio story Doctor Who and the Pescatons, and in several BBC and Big Finish audios since 2009.
Played: Meglos in Meglos (1980)
Career highlights
Tom's career began with a 1968 adaptation of The Winter's Tale, followed by roles in George and the Dragon (1968), Z Cars (1968), Softly Softly (1970), Nicholas and Alexandra (1971), The Canterbury Tales (1972), The Vault of Horror (1973), The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973), The Mutations (1974), Piccadilly Circus (1977), Late Night Story (1978), The Book Tower (1979-81), The Curse of King Tut's Tomb (1980), The Hound of the Baskervilles (1982, as Sherlock Holmes), Jemima Shore Investigates (1983), Remington Steele (1984), Blackadder II (1986), Roland Rat: The Series (1986), The Kenny Everett Television Show (1986), The Life and Loves of a She-Devil (1986), The Silver Chair (1990), Selling Hitler (1991), The Law Lord (1992), Cluedo (1992), Backtime (1998), Max Bear (2000), Dungeons and Dragons (2000), Fun at the Funeral Parlour (2001), Strange (2003), Fort Boyard (2003), Swiss Toni (2003), The Magic Roundabout (2005), Agatha Christie's Marple (2007), The Beeps (2007-08) and The Genie in the Bottle (2010). Tom has also had regular roles as Prof Geoffrey Hoyt in Medics (1992-95), Professor Wyvern in Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased) (2000-01) and Donald MacDonald in Monarch of the Glen (2004-05). He is probably most famous in his latter career for providing the eccentric narration for sketch series Little Britain between 2003-08.
Facts
Tom left home at 15 to become a monk with the Brothers of Ploermel on Jersey, but abandoned this profession at the age of 21 in favour of National Service. In 1971 Tom was nominated for two Golden Globe Awards for his portrayal of Rasputin in Nicholas and Alexandra (he was beaten by Ben Johnson and Desi Arnaz Jr). In December 1980 he married actress Lalla Ward (who had been companion Romana in Doctor Who since 1979), but the marriage ended 18 months later. He married third wife Sue Jerrard in 1986, previously an assistant editor on Doctor Who. Tom's old drinking buddies in the 1960s and 70s included artist Francis Bacon at the infamous Colony Room. Tom has several links to popular music - appearing on Technocat's single Only Human (1995), and providing a monologue on Witness to a Murder (Part Two) by Mansun (1998 - his Doctor and the TARDIS also appeared on the cover of the band's album Six). Pop band The Human League released a song entitled Tom Baker in 1980. In 1999 Tom published a short fairytale novel called The Boy Who Kicked Pigs, which has since been adapted for the stage. Tom's distinctive vocals can also be heard at various tourist attractions in the UK, such as the London Dungeon, Natural History Museum and Alton Towers' Nemesis ride. In 2006 Tom recorded 11,593 phrases so his voice could be used for BT's text messaging service to raise money for homeless charity Shelter - as a result record producer Mark Murphy created a single of Tom "singing" You Really Got Me by the Kinks.

Elisabeth Sladen (Sarah Jane Smith) Feb 1 1946 to Apr 19 2011 (pancreatic cancer)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Sarah Jane Smith in The Time Warrior (1973-74), Invasion of the Dinosaurs (1974), Death to the Daleks (1974), The Monster of Peladon (1974), Planet of the Spiders (1974), Robot (1974-75), The Ark in Space (1975), The Sontaran Experiment (1975), Genesis of the Daleks (1975), Revenge of the Cybermen (1975), Terror of the Zygons (1975), Planet of Evil (1975), Pyramids of Mars (1975), The Android Invasion (1975), The Brain of Morbius (1976), The Seeds of Doom (1976), The Masque of Mandragora (1976), The Hand of Fear (1976), K9 & Company (1981), The Five Doctors (1983), Dimensions in Time (1993), School Reunion (2006), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Invasion of the Bane (2007), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Revenge of the Slitheen (2007), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Eye of the Gorgon (2007), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Warriors of Kudlak (2007), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Whatever Happened to Sarah Jane? (2007), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Lost Boy (2007), The Stolen Earth/ Journey's End (2008), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Last Sontaran (2008), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Day of the Clown (2008), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Secrets of the Stars (2008), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Mark of the Berserker (2008), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Temptation of Sarah Jane Smith (2008), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Enemy of the Bane (2008), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Prisoner of the Judoon (2009), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Mad Woman in the Attic (2009), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Wedding of Sarah Jane Smith (2009), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Eternity Trap (2009), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Mona Lisa's Revenge (2009), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Gift (2009), The End of Time Part Two (2010), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Nightmare Man (2010), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Vault of Secrets (2010), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Death of the Doctor (2010), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Empty Planet (2010), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Lost in Time (2010), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Goodbye, Sarah Jane Smith (2010), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Sky (2011), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Curse of Clyde Langer (2011), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Man Who Never Was (2011).
Elisabeth also played Sarah in the 1975 audio story Doctor Who and the Pescatons, two BBC Radio stories - The Paradise of Death (1993) and The Ghosts of N-Space (1996) - and the fan video production Downtime (1995), as well as reprising the role for various Big Finish audio plays.
Career highlights
Elisabeth's earliest (uncredited) role was in Ferry Cross the Mersey (1965), then Coronation Street (1970), Z Cars (1971/72), Doomwatch (1972), Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em (1973), Hickory House (1973), Merry-Go-Round (1977), Send in the Girls (1978), Take My Wife (1979), Silver Dream Racer (1980), In Loving Memory (1980), Name for the Day (1980), Gulliver in Lilliput (1982), Dempsey and Makepeace (1985), Alice in Wonderland (1986), The Bill (1989), Men of the World (1994), Peak Practice (1996) and Faith in the Future (1996).
Facts
She was married to actor Brian Miller, also a Doctor Who alumni. Elisabeth appeared alongside seven of the TV Doctors (Doctors 1-5 either during her own era or in The Five Doctors, plus the Tenth and Eleventh Doctors in either 21st century Doctor Who or her own spin-off series). The Impossible Astronaut (2011) was dedicated to Elisabeth on its transmission, while a special programme entitled My Sarah Jane: A Tribute to Elisabeth Sladen aired on Children's BBC. BBC4 also repeated The Hand of Fear (1976) as a tribute.

Ian Marter (Harry Sullivan) Oct 28 1944 to Oct 28 1986 (diabetes-related heart attack)
Doctor Who credits
Played: John Andrews in Carnival of Monsters (1973)
Played: Harry Sullivan in Robot, The Ark in Space, The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, The Android Invasion (1974-75)
Career highlights
Ian played John Andrews in Carnival of Monsters (1973) and companion Harry Sullivan in seven serials between 1974-75. Ian's first acting credit was in Doctor Faustus (1967), followed by roles in The Abominable Dr Phibes (1971), Holly (1972), The Venturers (1975), Softly Softly (1975), The Brothers (1976), The Medusa Touch (1978, in which he was wrongly credited as Ian Master), ten episodes of Crown Court (1972/74/78), Hazell (1979), The Specialist (1980), Close to Home (1982), Shine On Harvey Moon (1984), Bergerac (1985) and The Return of Sherlock Holmes (1986).
Facts
He left Oxford University in 1969 to become a stage manager at the Bristol Old Vic circa 1970. He auditioned for the role of Captain Mike Yates in Doctor Who in 1970, and in later years took to writing, including nine novelisations of Doctor Who TV stories (courting controversy by using the word "bastard" in The Enemy of the World), as well as the original novel Harry Sullivan's War (1986), set a decade after Harry stopped travelling with the Doctor (Marter originally planned to kill Harry off at the end, but the publisher banned the idea). Ian died before completing his adaptation of The Rescue, which had to be completed by Nigel Robinson, and before he could adapt his promised sequel to Harry Sullivan's War. With the pen-name Ian Don, he also wrote the novelisation of the Hollywood films Splash (1984), Baby (1985), Tough Guys (1986) and Down and Out in Beverly Hills (1986), and several unpublished books based on the cartoon series The Gummi Bears. Another writing project that never saw the light of day was the script for an unmade film called Doctor Who Meets Scratchman, which he co-wrote with Tom Baker and James Hill in the mid-1970s.

Nicholas Courtney (Brigadier Lethbridge Stewart) Dec 16 1929 to Feb 22 2011 (cancer)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Bret Vyon in The Daleks' Master Plan (1965-66)
Played: Brigadier Lethbridge Stewart in The Web of Fear (then ranked as Colonel, 1968), The Invasion (1968), Spearhead from Space (1970), Doctor Who and the Silurians (1970), The Ambassadors of Death (1970), Inferno (1970), Terror of the Autons (1971), The Mind of Evil (1971), The Claws of Axos (1971), Colony in Space (1971), The Daemons (1971), Day of the Daleks (1972), The Time Monster (1972), The Three Doctors (1972-73), The Green Death (1973), The Time Warrior (1973-74), Invasion of the Dinosaurs (1974), Planet of the Spiders (1974), Robot (1974-75), Terror of the Zygons (1975), Mawdryn Undead (1983), The Five Doctors (1983), Battlefield (1989), Dimensions in Time (1993), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Enemy of the Bane (2008)
Played: Brigade Leader Lethbridge Stewart in Inferno (1970)
Played: Tourist in Silver Nemesis (1988, uncredited)
Career highlights
His TV career began in Escape (1957), followed by roles in Looking About (1962), The Avengers (1962/67), The Indian Tales of Rudyard Kipling (1964), The Saint (1965), The Champions (1968), Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased) (1969), Jason King (1971), The Rivals of Sherlock Holmes (1973), Shelley (1980), Then Churchill Said To Me (1982), Minder (1984), Yes, Prime Minister (1987), Only Fools and Horses (1988), Bullseye! (1990), French Fields (1990-91), Satellite City (1996), Doctors (2005), The Bill (2007) and Incendiary (2008).
Facts
Egypt born Nicholas also reprised the role of the Brigadier in the fan-made video production Downtime (1995), an episode of Harry Hill (2000) and a handful of Big Finish audio adventures. Nicholas acted alongside seven of the TV Doctors in the series, and on audio with Eighth Doctor Paul McGann. Nicholas was one of only two actors to have appeared in Doctor Who as the same character in its first three decades (1960s, 70s and 80s, along with Patrick Troughton). He also appeared in Dimensions in Time in the 1990s, and spin-off The Sarah Jane Adventures in the 2000s - thus beating Troughton!

John Levene (Benton) Born Dec 24 1941
Doctor Who credits
Played: Cyberman in The Moonbase (1967, uncredited)
Played: Yeti in The Web of Fear (1968), The War Games (1969, uncredited)
Played: Sergeant/ RSM Benton in The Invasion (1968), The Ambassadors of Death (1970), Inferno (1970), Terror of the Autons (1971), The Mind of Evil (1971), The Claws of Axos (1971), The Daemons (1971), Day of the Daleks (1972), The Time Monster (1972), The Three Doctors (1972-73), The Green Death (1973), Invasion of the Dinosaurs (1974), Planet of the Spiders (1974), Robot (1974-75), Terror of the Zygons (1975), The Android Invasion (1975)
Played: Platoon Under Leader Benton in Inferno (1970)
Career highlights
John's other appearances include Undermind (1965), Adam Adamant Lives! (1967), Z Cars (1967), Germinal (1970), UFO (1970), Callan (1972), Psychomania (1973), The Jensen Code (1973), Carry On Laughing! (1975), Big Bad Beetleborgs (1997), CanniBallistic! (2002), Automatons (2006) and Satan Hates You (2010).
Facts
John was inspired to become an actor after meeting Telly Savalas in a men's clothing shop. He quit acting in 1977 and set up his own audio-visual production company, before moving to America, where he started acting once more after working for some years as an entertainer on cruise liners. In 1987 he reprised the role of Benton for the fan video spin-off Wartime. John's wife Jeni is an executive at Warner Bros Studios. If you have a desire to hear John sing, then why not try out his 2012 album The Ballads of Sergeant Benton?

John Woodnutt (Duke of Forgill/ Broton) Mar 3 1924 to Jan 2 2006
Doctor Who credits
Played: Hibbert in Spearhead from Space (1970)
Played: Draconian Emperor in Frontier in Space (1973)
Played: Duke of Forgill/ Broton in Terror of the Zygons (1975)
Played: Seron in The Keeper of Traken (1981)
Career highlights
John became a prolific character actor after he first appeared in The Black Brigand (1956), then The Cabin in the Clearing (1959), Gamble for a Throne (1961), Swizzlewick (1964), The Avengers (1966), Rogues' Gallery (1969), The Six Wives of Henry VIII (1970, as Henry VII), Look and Read: The Boy from Space (1971, as the spooky Thin Man), The Tomorrow People (1973), The Secret Garden (1975), Children of the Stones (1977), Shoestring (1979), Stalky and Co. (1982), Lifeforce (1985), Porterhouse Blue (1987), Jeeves and Wooster (1990-93, as Sir Watkyn), Wycliffe (1995) and Harry Enfield and Chums (1997). He also played Mr Quelch in Billy Bunter of Greyfriars School (1959), Judge Weightman in Crown Court (1977-84) and Merlin/ Mogdred in children's virtual reality show Knightmare (1987-90).
Facts
John ended his years in the actors' retirement home Denville Hall.

Lillias Walker (Sister Lamont)
Career highlights
First appearing in Mr Brown Comes Down the Hill (as a harlot!) in 1965, Lillias also appeared in Out of the Unknown (1969), The First Churchills (1969), Paul Temple (1969), What Became of Jack and Jill? (1972), Sporting Scenes (1974), Intimate Reflections (1974), Beasts (1976), The Walls of Jericho (1981) and Charlie (1984). She also had a long-running role as Rosemary Cartland in over 50 episodes of The Cedar Tree (1976-78).
Facts
Lillias is married to prolific character actor Peter Vaughan.

Robert Russell (The Caber) May 24 1936 to May 12 2008 (heart attack)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Guard in The Power of the Daleks (1966)
Played: The Caber in Terror of the Zygons (1975)
Career highlights
In 1947, Kent-born Robert's family moved to South Africa, where he began to work in a gold mine, but he soon moved into acting, debuting in Police Surgeon (1960), The Saint (1966), Inspector Clouseau (1968), Witchfinder General (1968), Orlando (1968), The Guardians (1971), The Protectors (1973), Public Eye (1975), Space: 1999 (1975), Blake's 7 (1978), Sorry! (1981), The Chinese Detective (1982) and Strange Horizons (1993).
Facts
Robert worked in a South African gold mine in the early 1950s.

Angus Lennie (Angus) Apr 18 1930 to Sep 14 2014
Doctor Who credits
Played: Storr in The Ice Warriors (1967)
Played: Angus in Terror of the Zygons (1975)
Career highlights
Angus first appeared in The Mortimer Touch (1957) and later Para Handy - Master Mariner (1959-60), Tunes of Glory (1960), Petticoat Pirates (1961), The Great Escape (1963), 633 Squadron (1964), The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (1967), Oh! What a Lovely War (1969), The Borderers (1970), Paul Temple (1971), The Onedin Line (1973), One of Our Dinosaurs is Missing (1975), Send in the Girls (1978), Doom Castle (1980), Lovejoy (1986), Hannay (1988), All Night Long (1994), The Upper Hand (1995), Dad (1997) and Monarch of the Glen (2002-03). His most famous role was as chef Shughie McFee in the soap Crossroads (1974-80/85), as well as Murdoch in HMS Paradise (1964-65).

Tony Sibbald (Huckle) Jun 28 1936 to Dec 13 2011
Career highlights
Canadian Tony first appeared in a 1966 Play of the Month, and then appeared in Doomwatch (1970), Cry of the Banshee (1970), The Venturers (1975), Second Verdict (1976), Lillie (1978), Quatermass IV (1979), The Professionals (1980), Superman II (1980), The Nightmare Man (1981), Scream for Help (1984), A View to a Kill (1985), Small World (1988), Selling Hitler (1991), Hackers (1995) and One Foot in the Grave (1995).
Facts
Sadly, Tony was asked to do an interview for the DVD featurette for the Terror of the Zygons, but died while visiting friends in Thailand after the letter offering the interview was sent.

Hugh Martin (Munro) Dec 8 1933 to Jul 16 1997
Doctor Who credits
Played: Munro in Terror of the Zygons (1975)
Played: Priest in Vengeance on Varos (1985)
Career highlights
Debuting in The Errol Flynn Theatre (1957), Hugh's further work included Suspense (1962), Resurrection (1968), Softly Softly (1972), Hadleigh (1973), Oil Strike North (1975), The Sweeney (1976), Black Island (1979), The Enigma Files (1980), Union Castle (1982), Up the Elephant and Round the Castle (1985), A Very British Coup (1988) and Taggart (1983/90).

Bruce Wightman (Radio operator) Mar 5 1925 to Jan 8 2009
Doctor Who credits
Played: William de Tornebu in The Crusade (1965)
Played: Scott in The Daleks' Master Plan (1965-66)
Played: Radio operator in Terror of the Zygons (1975)
Career highlights
Bruce began his career in The Black Tulip (1956), then Blood of the Vampire (1958), The Rag Trade (1961), The Heart of Midlothian (1966), Confessions of a Window Cleaner (1974) and Great Performances (1977).
Facts
Bruce co-founded London's Dracula Society in 1973 with fellow actor Bernard Davies (who appeared in The War Games in 1969). During the 1970s and 80s Bruce ran Dracula tours in Romania. In the 1990s he lived in Bulgaria working as an art critic and journalist, but moved to New Zealand in 2001 to continue writing about the career of Bram Stoker.

Bernard G High (Corporal) Born Mar 21 1944
Doctor Who credits
Played: Soldier in The Web of Fear (1968)
Played: Corporal in Terror of the Zygons (1975)
Career highlights
Bernard debuted in A Game of Murder (1966), then took roles in Z Cars (1967), Detective (1968), Night After Night After Night (1969) and Within These Walls (1975). Bernard also wrote plays for the stage.

Keith Ashley (Zygon) Died 2007
Doctor Who credits
Played: Extra in The Savages (1966, uncredited), Planet of the Spiders (1974, uncredited)
Played: Firing squad member in The War Games (1969, uncredited)
Played: Technician in Doctor Who and the Silurians (1970, uncredited)
Played: Villager in The Daemons (1971, uncredited)
Played: Dalek operator in Genesis of the Daleks (1975)
Played: Zygon in Terror of the Zygons (1975)
Played: Sir Colin's aide in The Seeds of Doom (1976, uncredited)
Played: Brother in The Masque of Mandragora (1976, uncredited)
Career highlights
Keith's earliest credit was in The Love of Mike (1960), followed by roles in The Cheaters (1962), Frankie Howerd (1966), No, That's Me Over Here! (1970), The Adventurer (1972), Upstairs Downstairs (1972/73), Marked Personal (1973), Colditz (1974), The Onedin Line (1976), Get Some In! (1977) and Three Piece Suite (1977).

Ronald Gough (Zygon)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Technician in Doctor Who and the Silurians (1970, uncredited)
Played: Extra in Invasion of the Dinosaurs (1974, uncredited)
Played: Zygon in Terror of the Zygons (1975)
Career highlights
Further appearances include Softly Softly (1966), Big Breadwinner Hog (1969), Menace (1970), Colditz (1972), The Two Ronnies (1973), three episodes of Dixon of Dock Green (1971-74) and four episodes of Z Cars (1971-77).

Peter Symonds (Soldier)
Career highlights
Peter first appeared in Ooh La La! (1973), then Callan (1974), Look, Mike Yarwood! (1974), Plain Murder (1978), The Lonelyheart Kid (1984), Rumpole of the Bailey (1988), The Darling Buds of May (1991), The Final Cut (1995), The Long Firm (2004), Sharpe's Challenge (2006), Lewis (2007), EastEnders (2008) and Agatha Christie: Poirot (2013). He is also credited with writing an episode of children's series ChuckleVision in 1997.

CREW

Robert Banks Stewart (writer) Jul 16 1931 to Jan 14 2016 (cancer)
Doctor Who credits
Wrote: Terror of the Zygons (1975), The Seeds of Doom (1976), The Talons of Weng-Chiang (1977, story outline only)
Career highlights
Robert's writing career began with the 1959 series Knight Errant, and he went on to pen scripts for Interpol Calling (1959-60), Danger Man (1960-61), The Human Jungle (1963), Thorndyke (1964), Dr Finlay's Casebook (1964-65), Undermind (1965), The Avengers (1965-66), Adam Adamant Lives! (1966), Callan (1967-69), Special Branch (1969), Jason King (1972), Arthur of the Britons (1973), The Protectors (1974), The Sweeney (1975), Sutherland's Law (1975-76), Rooms (1977), Shoestring (1979-80), Jukes of Piccadilly (1980), Bergerac (1981-91), The Darling Buds of May (1991), Moon and Son (1992) and My Uncle Silas (2001-03). He also worked on many of these dramas as a producer, as well as Intrigue (1966), Lovejoy (1986), Hannay (1988) and Frank Stubbs (1993). He was also script editor on series such as The Human Jungle, Undermind, Harriet's Back in Town (1973), Van der Valk (1973) and Armchair Thriller (1978).
Facts
In 1981 he was nominated for BAFTA's Best Drama Series for Shoestring. Robert published his first novel in 2011 at the age of 81, called The Hurricane's Tale, and his memoirs, To Put You in the Picture, in 2015.

Douglas Camfield (director) May 8 1931 to Jan 27 1984 (heart attack)
Doctor Who credits
Production assistant: An Unearthly Child (uncredited, 1963), Marco Polo (uncredited, 1964)
Directed: An Unearthly Child (film inserts, uncredited, 1963), Planet of Giants (episode 4, material from which was edited into episode 3, 1964), The Crusade (1965), The Time Meddler (1965), The Daleks' Master Plan (1965-66), The Web of Fear (1968), The Invasion (1968), Inferno (1970), Terror of the Zygons (1975), The Seeds of Doom (1976).
Career highlights
Douglas's Doctor Who career began as production assistant on the very first story, and could have included a stint as its producer had he accepted the post when offered it in 1969. It may be just as well he didn't, as during production of Inferno the following year he was taken ill with a heart ailment, which he suffered with for the rest of his life. Formerly a lieutenant in the Army, Douglas also directed for Swizzlewick (1964), The Troubleshooters (1965), Out of the Unknown (1969), Z Cars (1969), Paul Temple (1969-71), Van der Valk (1972-73), Public Eye (1971-75), The Sweeney (1975-78), Blake's 7 (1978), The Professionals (1977/80), Shoestring (1979-80), The Nightmare Man (1981), Beau Geste (1982) and Missing from Home (1984). He also dabbled in writing, and had written Adventure to Order in 1961 before he pitched a script to Doctor Who in 1975 involving aliens, the French Foreign Legion and the death of companion Sarah Jane Smith, but this was never developed.
Facts
Douglas was married to actress Sheila Dunn, who he cast in three of his Doctor Who stories. He made a cameo as one of the faces seen during the mind battle between the Doctor and Morbius in The Brain of Morbius (1976).

Philip Hinchcliffe (producer) Born Oct 1 1944
Doctor Who credits
Produced: The Ark in Space, The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, Planet of Evil, Pyramids of Mars, The Android Invasion, The Brain of Morbius, The Seeds of Doom, The Masque of Mandragora, The Hand of Fear, The Deadly Assassin, The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang (1975-77)
Career highlights
Doctor Who was one of Philip's first TV jobs, after being script editor on Alexander the Greatest (1971), You're Only Young Twice (1971), The Jensen Code (1973) and The Kids from 47A (1973-74). After leaving Doctor Who, Philip became producer on Target (1977-78), Private Schulz (1981), Nancy Astor (1982), Strangers and Brothers (1984), The Charmer (1987), Bust (1987-88), Friday On My Mind (1992), An Awfully Big Adventure (1995), Seesaw (1998), McCallum (1998), Rebus (2000-01) and Taggart (1999-2001). Philip has also written scripts for Crossroads (1970), Target (1977) and Bust (1987-88), and novelised three Doctor Who stories for Target Books.
Facts
Philip won the 1990 Prix Europa Fiction Prize for And a Nightingale Sang, a film adapted from C P Taylor's play by screenwriter Jack Rosenthal. In 1977 he was nominated for a BAFTA for his work on Doctor Who, and received a further nomination for Private Schulz. There was also an Emmy nomination for Nancy Astor, a mini-series he produced in 1982. His daughter Celina Hinchcliffe is a British TV sports presenter, including for SkySports. His brother-in-law is actor Geoffrey Whitehead. In 2014 Philip returned to the world of Doctor Who by writing two new audio serials for the Fourth Doctor and Leela for Big Finish Productions.

Robert Holmes (script editor) Apr 2 1926 to May 24 1986 (chronic liver ailment)
Doctor Who credits
Wrote: The Krotons (1968-69), The Space Pirates (1969), Spearhead from Space (1970), Terror of the Autons (1971), Carnival of Monsters (1973), The Time Warrior (1973-74), The Ark in Space (1975), Pyramids of Mars (1975, uncredited), The Brain of Morbius (1976, uncredited), The Deadly Assassin (1976), The Talons of Weng-Chiang (1977), The Sun Makers (1977), The Ribos Operation (1978), The Power of Kroll (1978-79), The Caves of Androzani (1984), The Two Doctors (1985), The Trial of a Time Lord (1986)
Script edited: Robot, The Ark in Space (uncredited), The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, Planet of Evil, Pyramids of Mars, The Android Invasion, The Brain of Morbius, The Seeds of Doom, The Masque of Mandragora, The Hand of Fear, The Deadly Assassin (uncredited), The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang (uncredited), Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers (uncredited) (1974-78)
Career highlights
He began writing for TV as early as Knight Errant Limited (1960), and went on to write scripts for Deadline Midnight (1961), Ghost Squad (1962), Emergency Ward 10 (1962-63), Dr Finlay's Casebook (1964-65), Undermind (1965), No Hiding Place (1965-67), Public Eye (1965-68), Mr Rose (1967-68), Doomwatch (1971), Spyder's Web (1972), Dixon of Dock Green (1974), Jukes of Piccadilly (1980), The Nightmare Man (1981), Blake's 7 (1979/81), Into the Labyrinth (1981-82) and Bergerac (1983-87). He was also story editor on Armchair Thriller and Shoestring, both in 1980.
Facts
Robert was the youngest ever commissioned officer in the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, serving in Burma. After he left the Army he joined the police, then became a journalist and sports writer - he was the last ever editor of British lifestyle publication John Bull Magazine in 1964. He was originally going to write Doctor Who's 20th anniversary tale in 1983, but when he found the numerous elements he'd been asked to incorporate unworkable, he was replaced by Terrance Dicks. Robert died while writing the final two episodes of The Trial of a Time Lord, and due to tensions in the Doctor Who production office at the time, his original ending for the story had to be changed and written afresh by Pip and Jane Baker. His face was also one of those seen during the Time Lord mind battle in The Brain of Morbius.

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