Wednesday, May 28, 2014

Carnival of Monsters

Shirna (Cheryl Hall) and Vorg (Leslie Dwyer)
as an alternative Third Doctor and Jo?
Four episodes (Episode One, Episode Two, Episode Three, Episode Four)
First broadcast Jan 27 to Feb 17 1973
Average audience for serial: 9.18m

CAST

Jon Pertwee (The Doctor) Jul 7 1919 to May 20 1996 (heart attack)
Doctor Who credits
Played: The Doctor in Spearhead from Space, Doctor Who and the Silurians, The Ambassadors of Death, Inferno, Terror of the Autons, The Mind of Evil, The Claws of Axos, Colony in Space, The Daemons, Day of the Daleks, The Curse of Peladon, The Sea Devils, The Mutants, The Time Monster, The Three Doctors, Carnival of Monsters, Frontier in Space, Planet of the Daleks, The Green Death, The Time Warrior, Invasion of the Dinosaurs, Death to the Daleks, The Monster of Peladon, Planet of the Spiders (1970-74). Return appearances in The Five Doctors (1983), Dimensions in Time (1993).
Jon also played the Doctor in two BBC radio plays - The Paradise of Death (1993) and The Ghosts of N-Space (1996)
Career highlights
Jon made his acting debut in an uncredited role in A Yank at Oxford (1938), and then took roles in The Four Just Men (1939), Toad of Toad Hall (1946), Murder at the Windmill (1949, in which his surname was mis-spelt as Pertwer), Helter Skelter (1949), Will Any Gentleman...? (1953), Ivanhoe (1958), Just Joe (1960), Nearly a Nasty Accident (1961), four Carry On films (1964-92), Ollie and Fred's Five O'Clock Show (1965), A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (1966), The Jon Pertwee Show (1966), Beggar My Neighbour (1967), The Avengers (1967, ironically as a Brigadier), The House That Dripped Blood (1971), Whodunnit! (1974-78), The Goodies (1975), One of Our Dinosaurs is Missing (1975), Adventures of a Private Eye (1977), Wombling Free (1977), The Water Babies (1978), The Curious Case of Santa Claus (1982), The Boys in Blue (1982), Virtual Murder (1992) and Young Indiana Jones and the Attack of the Hawkmen (1995). Aside from Doctor Who, he was most famous for playing scatty scarecrow Worzel Gummidge (1979-81 and 1987-89), voicing Spotty in the SuperTed cartoons (1982-84 & 1989), playing Chief Petty Officer Pertwee (among others) in the radio series The Navy Lark (1959-77) and hosting TV murder mystery series Whodunnit (1972-78). Jon also appeared in a number of Doctor Who spin-off videos, including The Airzone Solution (1993) and The Zero Imperative (1994).
Facts
Born John Devon Roland Pertwee (the anglicised version of the real family name of Perthuis de Laillevault), he was the son of scriptwriter Roland Pertwee, brother of writer Michael Pertwee, and cousin to actor Bill Pertwee (best known for his role in the sitcom Dad's Army). His children are actress Dariel Pertwee and actor Sean Pertwee, and he was married to actress (and Doctor Who luminary) Jean Marsh between 1955-60. During World War Two he served in the Navy aboard HMS Hood, and luckily managed to return to shore shortly before it was sunk by the Bismarck. According to his biography Moon Boots and Dinner Suits, as a young boy he played with the son of the gamekeeper on the family estate. The gamekeeper was A A Milne, and his son was Christopher, the inspiration for Milne's later tales of Christopher Robin and Winnie the Pooh. Jon was a founder member of The Waistcoat Club (of which he owned more than 300, some dating back hundreds of years to King George III), set up to counter the drabness of men's dress (film Doctor Peter Cushing was also a member). Jon's godfather was the actor Henry Ainley, father to Anthony, who would play the Master in Doctor Who in the 1980s. Jon's musical efforts should also be remembered, including his 1972 vocal version of the Doctor Who theme, Who is the Doctor?, and his 1980 Top 40 single Worzel's Song. Following instructions in his will, Jon was cremated with an effigy of Worzel Gummidge attached to his casket. The British premiere of the 1996 Doctor Who TV movie was dedicated to Jon Pertwee, as it was broadcast just seven days after his death.

Katy Manning (Jo Grant) Born Oct 14 1946
Doctor Who credits
Played: Josephine Grant in Terror of the Autons, The Mind of Evil, The Claws of Axos, Colony in Space, The Daemons, Day of the Daleks, The Curse of Peladon, The Sea Devils, The Mutants, The Time Monster, The Three Doctors, Carnival of Monsters, Frontier in Space, Planet of the Daleks, The Green Death (1971-73). Returned in The Sarah Jane Adventures: Death of the Doctor (2010).
Career highlights
Katy made her debut in two episodes of the series Man At the Top (1971), followed by roles in The Golden Road (1973), Serendipity (1973, as presenter), Whodunnit? (1975), Target (1977), All Saints (2002), Oakie's Outback Adventures (2011) and The Haunting of Harry Payne (2014). Katy has voiced numerous cartoons and won several awards including Best Supporting Actress at the Melbourne Film Festival and several European awards as the voice of the ten-year-old Gloria in the animated cartoon Gloria’s House. On Australian TV Katy even had her own chat show, interviewing the likes of Lenny Henry, Robson Green and even Basil Brush! Since 2002 Katy has also played scatty Time Lady Iris Wildthyme in Big Finish audio plays.
Facts
Since the age of 12, Katy (who was offered, but turned down, a five-year contract with MGM in the early 1960s) has been a lifelong friend of actress and singer Liza Minnelli, who is one of 12 godparents to her two children - along with the actor Derek Fowlds, director Douglas Camfield, actor Derek Nimmo, entertainer Lionel Blair and actor Jimmy Edwards. Her partner is the actor/ singer Barry Crocker (the man who wrote the theme tune to Australian soap Neighbours) and in 1977 Katy appeared in the Australian magazine Girl Illustrated, posing nude with a Dalek (Katy says: "The Dalek pics in the Australian mag were never approved and in those days there was no comeback, so I live with and accept my responsibility (or lack of) but always hope that my career has been a little more than that!"). In 1962 Katy was involved in a car accident ("We went over a roundabout and into a garage. There were no seatbelts in those days. I was thrown through the windscreen and a plate-glass window") which left her with broken ribs and legs, an injured back and facial injuries which required reconstructive surgery. Katy's father was journalist James L Manning OBE, whose most notable journalistic achievement may be his expose of the use of performance-enhancing drugs in the 1967 Tour de France, specifically by British cyclist Tom Simpson, who died during the race. He also fought to have a doctor at the side of the ring in professional boxing matches, fought against apartheid in schools in Africa, for pensions for journalists' families and for the rights of female journalists, and was carried through the streets of Wales after fighting for miners' rights.
Note: This biog has been put together with the kind personal involvement of Katy herself, who was determined to make sure the facts were present - even down to her birth year! Any professional work listed on other websites which does not appear here may well be inaccurate, or indeed the work of another person (ie, Kate Manning). Thanks Katy!

Leslie Dwyer (Vorg) Aug 28 1906 to Dec 26 1986 (pulmonary embolism and congestive heart failure)
Career highlights
Leslie had a number of uncredited roles in films during World War Two before securing his first on-screen credit for In Which We Serve (1942), after which he appeared in The Way Ahead (1944), Night Boat to Dublin (1946), The Calendar (1948), The Bad Lord Byron (1949), Lilli Marlene (1951), Hindle Wakes (1952), The Good Die Young (1954), Where There's a Will (1955), Face in the Night (1957), The 39 Steps (1959), Jacks and Knaves (1961), Citizen James (1962), Steptoe and Son (1963), Diary of a Young Man (1964), Monster of Terror (1965), The Charlie Drake Show (1967), Crooks and Coronets (1969), You're Only Young Twice (1971), Follyfoot (1972), Beryl's Lot (1973), Oranges and Lemons (1973), Late Call (1975), The Squirrels (1976), Lord Tramp (1977), Coronation Street (1968/78), The Famous Five (1978), Terry and June (1979) and Time of My Life (1980). His most famous role was as grumpy Punch and Judy man Mr Partridge in 36 episodes of holiday camp sitcom Hi-De-Hi! (1980-84).
Facts
Leslie's father was comedian and variety act Johnny Dwyer (aka Gracewell Sutterby).

Cheryl Hall (Shirna) Born Jul 23 1950
Career highlights
Cheryl made her debut in the 1968 series You and the World, after which she appeared in Special Branch (1969), Smith (1970), Deep End (1970), On the Buses (1971), Albert! (1972), Sykes (1972), Rentadick (1972), No Sex Please, We're British! (1973), Anyone for Sex? (1973), Oranges and Lemons (1973), Bless This House (1974), Angels (1975), Whodunnit? (1975), Rainbow (1974/76), Lucky Feller (1975-76), Rooms (1975/77), Survivors (1977), Danger UXB (1979), In Loving Memory (1981), Dodger, Bonzo and the Rest (1985, as well as its 1984 Dramarama "pilot"), EastEnders (1988), Agatha Christie's Poirot (1989), The Men's Room (1991), So Haunt Me (1992), Magic Grandad (1993), Woof! (1994), Bramwell (1998), Silent Witness (1999-2000), Waking the Dead (2002), Rehab (2003) and 18 episodes of The Bill between 1984-2007.
Facts
Cheryl made the final six shortlist to play Jo Grant after auditioning for the part in 1970. Between 1974-80 Cheryl was married to actor Robert Lindsay, and played his character Wolfie's girlfriend Shirley in the sitcom Citizen Smith (1977-79). Cheryl stood as Liberal candidate for Aston Under Lyne in the 1992 UK general election, coming fourth with 907 votes and 2.1% of the ballot; she later stood as Labour candidate for Canterbury in the 1997 UK General Election, securing almost 17,000 votes and 31% of the ballot, but lost out to Conservative candidate Julian Brazier. She later went on to become a Labour county councillor (and local party leader) in Kent, and later a teacher in Chesterfield, Derbyshire (it is unfortunate that Cheryl gets quite scathing "reviews" by pupils on Rate My Teachers).

Tenniel Evans (Major Daly) May 17 1926 to Jun 10 2009 (emphysema)
Career highlights
Kenyan born Tenniel's prolific career began in a 1960 adaptation of Somerset Maugham's The Kite, after which he appeared in Harpers West One (1961), The Plane Makers (1963), The Sullavan Brothers (1964-65, as John Sullavan), Mrs Thursday (1966), The Forsyte Saga (1967), Sanctuary (1967-68), four episodes of The Avengers (1961-63/68), Big Breadwinner Hog (1969), Roads to Freedom (1970), War and Peace (1972), Rooms (1975), My Brother's Keeper (1975-76, as Sergeant Bluett), The Ghosts of Motley Hall (1977), Raven (1977), Yes, Minister (1980), Sink or Swim (1982), Hallelujah! (1984), Shine On Harvey Moon (1985), One By One (1987), Knights of God (1987), Inspector Morse (1989), Rides (1993), Anna Lee (1994), September Song (1994), Pat and Margaret (1994), Giving Tongue (1996), Bugs (1997), Dalziel and Pascoe (2000) and William and Mary (2004). He will be best recognised as the second actor to play Perce in sitcom The Two of Us (1987-90), taking over from original actor Patrick Troughton after he died.
Facts
Tenniel, who qualified as a Church of England non-stipendiary minister in 1985, was legendary screen actor and producer Leslie Banks's son-in-law, his son was TV director Matthew Evans and his daughter actress Serena Evans (better known as Sgt Patricia Dawkins in the sitcom The Thin Blue Line). Tenniel's family is related on one side to author George Eliot and on the other to John Tenniel, the man who originally illustrated Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland books. Tenniel was a member of the team behind BBC radio's The Navy Lark in the 1950s alongside Jon Pertwee, who he urged to audition for the role of the Doctor in 1969.

Ian Marter (John Andrews) Oct 28 1944 to Oct 28 1986 (diabetes-related heart attack)
Doctor Who credits
Played: John Andrews in Carnival of Monsters (1973)
Played: Harry Sullivan in Robot, The Ark in Space, The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, The Android Invasion (1974-75)
Career highlights
Ian played John Andrews in Carnival of Monsters (1973) and companion Harry Sullivan in seven serials between 1974-75. Ian's first acting credit was in Doctor Faustus (1967), followed by roles in The Abominable Dr Phibes (1971), Holly (1972), The Venturers (1975), Softly Softly (1975), The Brothers (1976), The Medusa Touch (1978, in which he was wrongly credited as Ian Master), ten episodes of Crown Court (1972/74/78), Hazell (1979), The Specialist (1980), Close to Home (1982), Shine On Harvey Moon (1984), Bergerac (1985) and The Return of Sherlock Holmes (1986).
Facts
He left Oxford University in 1969 to become a stage manager at the Bristol Old Vic circa 1970. He auditioned for the role of Captain Mike Yates in Doctor Who in 1970, and in later years took to writing, including nine novelisations of Doctor Who TV stories (courting controversy by using the word "bastard" in The Enemy of the World), as well as the original novel Harry Sullivan's War (1986), set a decade after Harry stopped travelling with the Doctor (Marter originally planned to kill Harry off at the end, but the publisher banned the idea). Ian died before completing his adaptation of The Rescue, which had to be completed by Nigel Robinson, and before he could adapt his promised sequel to Harry Sullivan's War. With the pen-name Ian Don, he also wrote the novelisation of the Hollywood films Splash (1984), Baby (1985), Tough Guys (1986) and Down and Out in Beverly Hills (1986), and several unpublished books based on the cartoon series The Gummi Bears. Another writing project that never saw the light of day was the script for an unmade film called Doctor Who Meets Scratchman, which he co-wrote with Tom Baker and James Hill in the mid-1970s.

Jenny McCracken (Claire Daly) Born Apr 9 1946
Career highlights
Jenny's earliest credit was in Z Cars (1968), then Detective (1969), Rookery Nook (1970), A Cuckoo in the Nest (1970), Ace of Wands (1972), The Dick Emery Show (1976), Rings on Their Fingers (1978), Only When I Laugh (1980), Dombey and Son (1983), The Mistress (1985), Jossy's Giants (1986), David Copperfield (1986), Little Lord Fauntleroy (1995), Peak Practice (1997), Heartbeat (2000), Judge John Deed (2001) and From Time to Time (2009).
Facts
Jenny made the final six shortlist to play Jo Grant after auditioning for the part in 1970.

Peter Halliday (Pletrac) Jun 2 1924 to Feb 18 2012
Doctor Who credits
Played: Packer in The Invasion (1968)
Played: Silurian voices in Doctor Who and the Silurians (1970)
Played: Alien voices in The Ambassadors of Death (1970)
Played: Pletrac in Carnival of Monsters (1973)
Played: Soldier in City of Death (1979)
Played: Vicar in Remembrance of the Daleks (1988)
Career highlights
Peter's career began with 1954's Fatal Journey and he then took roles in The Count of Monte Cristo (1956), Dunkirk (1958), The Citadel (1960), Garry Halliday (1962), Sierra Nine (1963), Danger Man (1965), Write a Play (1965), The Avengers (1968), UFO (1970-71), Sunday Bloody Sunday (1971), The Befrienders (1972), Bowler (1973), The Boy with Two Heads (1974), The Sweeney (1975), Keep It Up Downstairs (1976), Beasts (1976), Angels (1982), The Tripods (1984), Hannay (1989), The Remains of the Day (1993), Our Friends in the North (1996), Goodnight Sweetheart (1997), Esther (1999), Micawber (2001) and Lassie (2005). He also played Dr John Fleming in A for Andromeda (1961) and The Andromeda Breakthrough (1962).
Facts
Peter was for a time married to the actress Simone Lovell, daughter of the actors Raymond Lovell and Margot Collis (who had an affair with the poet W B Yeats during her marriage to Lovell).

Michael Wisher (Kalik) May 19 1935 to Jul 21 1995 (heart attack)
Doctor Who credits
Played: John Wakefield in The Ambassadors of Death (1970)
Played: Rex Farrel in Terror of the Autons (1971)
Played: Kalik in Carnival of Monsters (1973)
Played: Dalek voice in Frontier in Space (1973), Planet of the Daleks (1973), Death to the Daleks (1974), Genesis of the Daleks (1975, uncredited)
Played: Davros in Genesis of the Daleks (1975)
Played: Magrik in Revenge of the Cybermen (1975)
Played: Morelli in Planet of Evil (1975)
Career highlights
Michael made his acting debut in a 1963 edition of Suspense, and also appeared in No Hiding Place (1963), Adventure Weekly (1969), Colditz (1972), Moonbase 3 (1973), Dixon of Dock Green (1975), The Prince and the Pauper (1976), Airline (1982), Cover Her Face (1985), Alice in Wonderland (1986), Vanity Fair (1987), The Bill (1989) and EastEnders (1991).
Facts
Michael also appeared in a number of Doctor Who spin-off videos, such as Wartime (1987), Summoned by Shadows (1992), The Airzone Solution (1993) and Shakedown (1994). He also briefly appeared in the 1995 documentary Dalekmania. He was asked to reprise his iconic role of Davros in both 1979 and 1984, but stage tours restricted his availability. However, he did play Davros again in the 1993 stage play The Trial of Davros. Michael's son Andrew is also an actor.

Terence Lodge (Orum)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Medok in The Macra Terror (1967)
Played: Orum in Carnival of Monsters (1973)
Played: Moss in Planet of the Spiders (1974)
Career highlights
His CV also includes An Age of Kings (1960), The Avengers (1963/64), The Baron (1966), Germinal (1970), Jason King (1972), Barlow at Large (1975), Angels (1983), David Copperfield (1986), Hands of a Murderer (1990), The Bill (1995) and London's Burning (1995).
Facts
His birthname was William (possibly Terence) Stockting (incidentally, a Terence Stockting wrote a few episodes of TV soap Compact in 1964 - could that have been the same man?). Terence, who in 1959 wrote a stage play called Who's Who performed at Birmingham Repertory Theatre, briefly left the acting industry in the mid-1970s, but returned in the early 1980s. He finally retired in the late 1990s, reportedly after a negative experience on the soap Family Affairs.
In 2015 Toby Hadoke released his Who's Round interview with Terence here.

Andrew Staines (Captain) Died Sep 16 2016
Doctor Who credits
Played: Sergeant to Benik in The Enemy of the World (1967-68)
Played: Goodge in Terror of the Autons (1971)
Played: Captain in Carnival of Monsters (1973)
Played: Keaver in Planet of the Spiders (1974)
Career highlights
Andrew's only other screen credits are on Justice (1971) and The Woman in White (1982), although he worked extensively in theatre.
Facts
In 2008 Andrew was interviewed for the British Library's Theatre Archive Project, and had this to say about his time on Doctor Who: "I was in one - Pertwee had been the Doctor for several episodes then- but he had a change of personnel and had Katy Manning as his female sidekick and Roger Delgado as the Master, and then I was in two or three others after that, and then there I was in Jon's final one. They got Tom Baker in on the last day of rehearsal so that he could be transformed from Jon Pertwee - I was very interested, standing on the sidelines and watching them do it. I rather regret that I never went on to do an episode with Tom Baker." A transcript of the full interview can be found here.
In 2016 Toby Hadoke released his Who's Round interview with Andrew here.

CREW

Robert Holmes (writer) Apr 2 1926 to May 24 1986 (chronic liver ailment)
Doctor Who credits
Wrote: The Krotons (1968-69), The Space Pirates (1969), Spearhead from Space (1970), Terror of the Autons (1971), Carnival of Monsters (1973), The Time Warrior (1973-74), The Ark in Space (1975), Pyramids of Mars (1975, uncredited), The Brain of Morbius (1976, uncredited), The Deadly Assassin (1976), The Talons of Weng-Chiang (1977), The Sun Makers (1977), The Ribos Operation (1978), The Power of Kroll (1978-79), The Caves of Androzani (1984), The Two Doctors (1985), The Trial of a Time Lord (1986)
Script edited: Robot, The Ark in Space (uncredited), The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, Planet of Evil, Pyramids of Mars, The Android Invasion, The Brain of Morbius, The Seeds of Doom, The Masque of Mandragora, The Hand of Fear, The Deadly Assassin (uncredited), The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang (uncredited), Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers (uncredited) (1974-78)
Career highlights
He began writing for TV as early as Knight Errant Limited (1960), and went on to write scripts for Deadline Midnight (1961), Ghost Squad (1962), Emergency Ward 10 (1962-63), Dr Finlay's Casebook (1964-65), Undermind (1965), No Hiding Place (1965-67), Public Eye (1965-68), Mr Rose (1967-68), Doomwatch (1971), Spyder's Web (1972), Dixon of Dock Green (1974), Jukes of Piccadilly (1980), The Nightmare Man (1981), Blake's 7 (1979/81), Into the Labyrinth (1981-82) and Bergerac (1983-87). He was also story editor on Armchair Thriller and Shoestring, both in 1980.
Facts
Robert was the youngest ever commissioned officer in the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, serving in Burma. After he left the Army he joined the police, then became a journalist and sports writer - he was the last ever editor of British lifestyle publication John Bull Magazine in 1964. He was originally going to write Doctor Who's 20th anniversary tale in 1983, but when he found the numerous elements he'd been asked to incorporate unworkable, he was replaced by Terrance Dicks. Robert died while writing the final two episodes of The Trial of a Time Lord, and due to tensions in the Doctor Who production office at the time, his original ending for the story had to be changed and written afresh by Pip and Jane Baker. His face was also one of those seen during the Time Lord mind battle in The Brain of Morbius.

Barry Letts (director (uncredited) and producer) Mar 26 1925 to Oct 9 2009 (cancer)
Doctor Who credits
Directed: The Enemy of the World (1967-68), Inferno (1970, episodes 3-7 (studio), uncredited), Terror of the Autons (1971, uncredited), Carnival of Monsters (1973), Planet of the Spiders (1974), The Android Invasion (1975)
Played: Man in Doctor Who and the Silurians (1970, uncredited)
Played: Police radio voice in Planet of the Spiders (1974, uncredited)
Wrote: The Daemons (1971, as Guy Leopold), The Time Monster (1972, uncredited), The Green Death (1973, uncredited), Planet of the Spiders (1974, uncredited)
Produced: Doctor Who and the Silurians, The Ambassadors of Death, Inferno, Terror of the Autons, The Mind of Evil, The Claws of Axos, Colony in Space, The Daemons, Day of the Daleks, The Curse of Peladon, The Sea Devils, The Mutants, The Time Monster, The Three Doctors, Carnival of Monsters, Frontier in Space, Planet of the Daleks, The Green Death, The Time Warrior, Invasion of the Dinosaurs, Death to the Daleks, The Monster of Peladon, Planet of the Spiders (uncredited), Robot (1970-75)
Executive producer: The Leisure Hive, Meglos, Full Circle, State of Decay, Warriors' Gate, The Keeper of Traken, Logopolis (1980-81)
Barry also wrote two BBC Radio serials starring Jon Pertwee and Elisabeth Sladen - The Paradise of Death (1993) and The Ghosts of N-Space (1996).
Career highlights
Barry started out as an actor in San Demetrio London (1943), and also popped up in Scott of the Antarctic (1948), The Cruel Sea (1953), The Silver Sword (1957-58), The Black Arrow (1958), The Moonstone (1959), Coronation Street (1961), City Beneath the Sea (1962), The Avengers (1964), The Indian Tales of Rudyard Kipling (1964), Z Cars (1963-64/65), Softly Softly (1966), The Man Who Never Was (1966) and This Man Craig (1966). His directing career began with The Newcomers (1965), and also included Z Cars (1967-68), Adventure Weekly (1969), The Prince and the Pauper (1976), Gulliver in Lilliput (1982), Brookside (1982), David Copperfield (1986), Alice in Wonderland (1986) and EastEnders (1990-92). As a producer, he worked on and helped create Moonbase 3 (1973), Lorna Doone (1976), Katy (1976), Nicholas Nickleby (1977), The Children of the New Forest (1977), Sexton Blake and the Demon God (1978), Pinocchio (1978), The Old Curiosity Shop (1979-80), A Tale of Two Cities (1980), Sense and Sensibility (1981), Great Expectations (1981), The Hound of the Baskervilles (1982, starring Tom Baker), Dombey and Son (1983), Goodbye Mr Chips (1984), The Invisible Man (1984) and The Pickwick Papers (1985).
Facts
His sister was actress Pauline Letts, while his sons are actors Dominic and Crispin Letts. The 2009 Doctor Who story The Waters of Mars was dedicated to his memory.

Terrance Dicks (script editor) Born Apr 14 1935
Doctor Who credits
Script edited: The Invasion, The Krotons, The Seeds of Death, The War Games, Spearhead from Space, Doctor Who and the Silurians, The Ambassadors of Death, Inferno, Terror of the Autons, The Mind of Evil, The Claws of Axos, Colony in Space, The Daemons, Day of the Daleks, The Curse of Peladon, The Sea Devils, The Mutants, The Time Monster, The Three Doctors, Carnival of Monsters, Frontier in Space, Planet of the Daleks, The Green Death, The Time Warrior, Invasion of the Dinosaurs, Death to the Daleks, The Monster of Peladon, Planet of the Spiders (1968-74)
Wrote: The War Games (1969), Robot (1974-75), The Brain of Morbius (1976, as Robin Bland), Horror of Fang Rock (1977), State of Decay (1980), The Five Doctors (1983)
Played: Man in Doctor Who and the Silurians (1970, uncredited)
Career highlights
Prolific writer Terrance also wrote for Crossroads (1964), The Avengers (1962-69), Moonbase 3 (1973), Space: 1999 (1976) and Beau Geste (1982). He took script editor duties on Moonbase 3 (1973), Great Expectations (1981), Stalky & Co. (1982), The Hound of the Baskervilles (1982, with Tom Baker as Sherlock Holmes), Dombey and Son (1983), Jane Eyre (1983), The Invisible Man (1984) and The Pickwick Papers (1985). As a producer, he worked on Oliver Twist (1985), Alice in Wonderland (1986), Brat Farrar (1986), David Copperfield (1986), The Diary of Anne Frank (1987) and Vanity Fair (1987).
Facts
Terrance has maintained his links to Doctor Who over the years, having written over 60 TV story novelisations, as well as two stageplays - Doctor Who and the Daleks in the Seven Keys to Doomsday (1974) and The Ultimate Adventure (1989) - a number of spin-off video and audio dramas, and original titles in the Virgin New Adventures, Missing Adventures, BBC Books and Quick Reads ranges. Away from Doctor Who, Terrance has also written extensively for children's fiction and non-fiction book ranges since 1976, including Star Quest, The Mounties, The Baker Street Irregulars, Cry Vampire, The Adventures of Goliath, Chronicles of a Computer Game Addict, The Unexplained and many more.

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