Monday, December 16, 2013

The Power of the Daleks

The Doctor (Patrick Troughton) and his
companions waste no time in meeting
 the most evil creatures in the universe
Six episodes (Episode One, Episode Two, Episode Three, Episode Four, Episode Five, Episode Six)
First broadcast Nov 5 to Dec 10 1966
Average audience for serial: 7.80m
  • A pictorial guide to the guest cast is at the bottom of this entry
CAST

Patrick Troughton (The Doctor) Mar 25 1920 to Mar 28 1987 (heart attack)
Doctor Who credits
Played: The Doctor in The Power of the Daleks, The Highlanders, The Underwater Menace, The Moonbase, The Macra Terror, The Faceless Ones, The Evil of the Daleks, The Tomb of the Cybermen, The Abominable Snowmen, The Ice Warriors, The Enemy of the World, The Web of Fear, Fury from the Deep, The Wheel in Space, The Dominators, The Mind Robber, The Invasion, The Krotons, The Seeds of Death, The Space Pirates, The War Games (1966-69). Return appearances in The Three Doctors (1972-73), The Five Doctors (1983), The Two Doctors (1985).
Played: Salamander in The Enemy of the World (1967-68)
Career highlights
Patrick appeared in over 130 productions, starting in 1947's Hamlet and including the title role in Robin Hood (1953), The Scarlet Pimpernel (1956), The Moonraker (1958), Sir Francis Drake (1962), Compact (1962), Jason and the Argonauts (1963), A Family at War (1970-72, as Harry Porter), The Sweeney (1975), The Omen (1976), Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger (1977), The Devil's Crown (1978), Nanny (1981-82, as Mr Jessop), The Box of Delights (1984), The Two of Us (1986, as Perce), Super Gran (1987) and Knights of God (1987).
Facts
When he was announced as William Hartnell's successor in the role of the Doctor, Hartnell said: "He's the only man in Britain who could do it!". When the Second World War broke out, Patrick was on a Belgian ship sailing from the US, but just in sight of the British coast it hit a mine and sank. He was fortunate enough to escape in a lifeboat. Patrick is the father of acting brothers Michael and David Troughton - Michael appeared in Doctor Who's Christmas special in 2014, and David appeared in the series four times, in 1966, 1969, 1972 and 2008. Patrick is grandfather to actor Harry Melling, better known as Dudley Dursley in the Harry Potter films, and actor Sam Troughton, whose most high profile role was as Much in Robin Hood (2006-07). Another grandchild, Jim Troughton, was a Warwickshire and England cricketer. Patrick died in Georgia, US, while attending a Doctor Who convention.

Anneke Wills (Polly) Born Oct 20 1941 For a full career biography for Anneke Wills, click here.

Michael Craze (Ben Jackson) Nov 29 1942 to Dec 7 1998 (heart attack)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Ben Jackson in The War Machines, The Smugglers, The Tenth Planet, The Power of the Daleks, The Highlanders, The Underwater Menace, The Moonbase, The Macra Terror, The Faceless Ones (1966-67)
Career highlights
Michael also acted in Blow Your Own Trumpet (1958), Target Luna (1960), four episodes of Dixon of Dock Green (1962-66), Cluff (1965), Gideon's Way (1966), Sat'day While Sunday (1967), Journey to the Unknown (1969), A Family at War (1970), The Pathfinders (1972), three episodes of Z Cars (1970-77), Crown Court (1974), Intimate Strangers (1974), Terror (1978), The December Rose (1986), The Diary of Ann Frank (1987) and The Healer (1994).
Facts
From the 1980s Michael managed a public house. His brother was actor Peter Craze, who appeared in three Doctor Who stories. Michael died after falling downstairs while picking up a neighbour's newspaper, and because of a heart condition could not be operated on. His name was immortalised by comedy sketch show Little Britain in the character Sir Michael Craze, a theatrical agent. Touchingly, the Doctor Who theme was played at Michael's funeral. His wife Edwina also worked in television, notably as an associate producer on This Life (1996-97); the couple met when Edwina was working as a production assistant on The Tenth Planet (1966). Edwina died of cancer aged 60 the year after Michael.

Martin King (The Examiner)
Career highlights
Martin's acting career began with Dixon of Dock Green (1961), followed by roles in Crossroads (1964), The Likely Lads (1965), Detective (1968) and The Troubleshooters (1969). He also provided various voices for Gerry Anderson's Captain Scarlet and the Mysterons (1967-68) and Joe 90 (1968).
Facts
Martin also worked as a continuity announcer for both Southern Television in 1973 and the BBC between 1973-89 (introducing episodes of Doctor Who in the 1980s), as well as the BBC World Service.

Nicholas Hawtrey (Quinn)
Career highlights
Debuted uncredited in an adaptation of The Winslow Boy in 1948, followed by roles in The Barretts of Wimpole Street (1957), Hamlet (1961), Sword of Honour (1967), The Big Switch (1968), The Regiment (1972), Madame Bovary (1975), Mistral's Daughter (1984), Dangerous Liaisons (1988), Navarro (1989), French Kiss (1995), Brief Crossing (2001) and Grace of Monaco (2014).
Facts
His father was actor Anthony Hawtrey and his grandfather was stage actor (but not the Carry On star) Charles Hawtrey. Nicholas, who was married to the late classical pianist Julia Cload, now lives in France.

Bernard Archard (Bragen) Aug 20 1916 to May 1 2008
Doctor Who credits
Played: Bragen in The Power of the Daleks (1966)
Played: Marcus Scarman in Pyramids of Mars (1975)
Career highlights
Bernard's career stems back as far as The Immortal Lady (1948) and includes For the Children (1948), The Adventures of Annabel (1955), Kenilworth (1957) and takes in Mary Britten, MD (1958), Corridors of Blood (1958), Village of the Damned (1960), Sir Francis Drake (1962), The List of Adrian Messenger (1963), Sergeant Cork (1964), Out of the Unknown (1966), The Spy with a Cold Nose (1966), The Avengers (1965/68), Callan (1969), Manhunt (1970), The Horror of Frankenstein (1970), Dad's Army (1971), The Day of the Jackal (1973), Get Some In! (1975), Sky (1975), Dick Turpin (1979), The Sea Wolves (1980), Krull (1983), Bergerac (1985/87) and Keeping Up Appearances (1991). He also had regular roles as Oreste Pinto in Spy-Catcher (1959-61), General Plaski in The Midnight Men (1964), Ian the editor in Lytton's Diary (1985-86) and Leonard Kempinski in soap Emmerdale (1992-94).
Facts
Bernard, who was a conscientious objector during the Second World War, celebrated a civil partnership with his partner of 60 years, fellow actor Jim Belchamber, in 2006.

Robert James (Lesterson) Mar 28 1924 to Jul 31 2004 (Alzheimer's disease)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Lesterson in The Power of the Daleks (1966)
Played: High priest in The Masque of Mandragora (1976)
Career highlights
Trained lawyer Robert's extensive career began in Robert's Wife (1955), then Around the World in 80 Days (1956), All Aboard (1959), Two Way Stretch (1960), Silent Evidence (1962), five episodes of The Avengers (1961-68), Smuggler's Bay (1964), For Whom the Bell Tolls (1965), The Love Bug (1968), Sinister Street (1969), The Six Wives of Henry VIII (1970), The Borderers (1970), Mary, Queen of Scots (1971), Captain Kronos - Vampire Hunter (1974), Sutherland's Law (1973-74, as Hamish McNab), Steptoe and Son (1974), Nicholas Nickleby (1977), The Mackinnons (1977), Blake's 7 (1978), Doom Castle (1980), Nanny (1982), The Jewel in the Crown (1984), The Return of the Antelope (1986), Century Falls (1993), Cold Comfort Farm (1995), The Crow Road (1996), Looking After JoJo (1998) and Existo (1999). He also had a regular role as James Gibson in Dr Finlay's Casebook (1962-69).
Facts
Robert's wife was fellow actor Mona Bruce.

Pamela Ann Davy (Janley) Born 1939
Career highlights
Australian Pamela made her acting debut in The Adventures of Robin Hood (1956), followed by roles in Summer's Here (1957), It Happened Like This (1962), Second City Reports (1964), It's Dark Outside (1965), The Avengers (1962/67), The First Churchills (1969) and Department S (1970). Her last credited role was as Colonel Aristides in 12 episodes of Freewheelers (1970).
Facts
Pamela now lives in Tasmania, Australia.
In 2016 Toby Hadoke released his Who's Round interview with Pamela here.

Peter Bathurst (Hensell) May 4 1912 to Jun 1989
Doctor Who credits
Played: Hensell in The Power of the Daleks (1966)
Played: Chinn in The Claws of Axos (1971)
Career highlights
First appearing in The Passing Show (1951) after working in Australia in the 1940s, Peter's work includes The Bell Family (1951, as narrator), Old Mother Riley Meets the Vampire (1952), Gift Horse (1952), The Quatermass Experiment (1953), John and Julie (1955), Kenilworth (1957), The Army Game (1960), Bootsie and Snudge (1963), R3 (1964), The Murder Game (1965), Adam Adamant Lives! (1967), as Dr Upton in Doctor in the House (1969) and Doctor at Large (1971), War and Peace (1972) and Moonbase 3 (1973).
Facts
In the 1960s Peter (born Apsley Dundas Bathurst) ran a popular coffee bar on London's King's Road, but this business seemed to fall through, as his actress daughter Linda Marlowe said in an interview in 2001: "[It should] have been a gold mine but he was too trusting and was bamboozled by people." Peter's daughter was once married to actor William Marlowe (who appeared in the Doctor Who stories The Mind of Evil and Revenge of the Cybermen).

Edward Kelsey (Resno) Born 1930
Doctor Who credits
Played: Slave buyer in The Romans (1965)
Played: Resno in The Power of the Daleks (1966)
Played: Edu in The Creature from the Pit (1979)
Career highlights
Debuted in Mary Britten MD (1958), then The Men from Room 13 (1961), The Avengers (1962), St Ives (1967), The Saint (1968), Doomwatch (1970), Cranford (1972), Shoestring (1979), Minder (1982), Anna of the Five Towns (1985), Casualty (1987), The Vicar of Dibley (1994), Brush with Fate (2003) and Wallace and Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit (2005). Edward also memorably provided the voice of Baron Silas Greenback and Colonel K in the cartoon series Danger Mouse (1981-92). Since 1985 he has also played Joe Grundy on BBC Radio 4's long-running soap The Archers.

Richard Kane (Valmar) Born Sep 17 1938
Career highlights
Debuted in No Hiding Place (1965), then The Borderers (1970), Crown Court (1975), Devenish (1977), My Son, My Son (1979), A.D. (1985), Widows 2 (1985), Wyatt's Watchdogs (1988), Victoria Wood (1989), Bramwell (1996) and Casualty (2004). He also enjoyed the regular role of Greg Kettle in Hot Metal (1986-88).

Peter Hawkins (Dalek voice) Apr 3 1924 to Jul 8 2006
Doctor Who credits
Played: Voice of the Daleks in The Daleks (1963-64), The Dalek Invasion of Earth (1964), The Space Museum (1965), The Chase (1965), Dr Who and the Daleks (1965, film), Mission to the Unknown (1965), The Daleks' Master Plan (1965-66), Daleks: Invasion Earth 2150 AD (1966, film), The Power of the Daleks (1966), The Evil of the Daleks (1967)
Played: Voice of the Cybermen in The Tenth Planet (1966), The Moonbase (1967), The Tomb of the Cybermen (1967), The Wheel in Space (1968)
Played: Voice of Marc Cory in The Daleks' Master Plan (1965-66)
Career highlights
Peter also provided memorable voices for series such as Whirligig (1950), The Flowerpot Men (1952), The Woodentops (1955), A Rubovian Legend (1955-56), Captain Pugwash (1957), Bleep and Booster (1963), Stories from ToyTown (1972), Rainbow (1972, as Zippy), The Perishers (1978), SuperTed (1982-84), The Family Ness (1984), Jimbo and the Jet-Set (1986) and Penny Crayon (1989-90), among others. He was also the legendary announcer for "Herge's Adventures of Tintin!" and the laughing Martian robots from the Smash adverts. Acting credits include The Machine Breakers (1957), Softly Softly (1966), A Family at War (1971), Dial M for Murder (1974) and The Four Corners of Nowhere (1995).
Facts
Peter was originally going to provide the voice of Gromit the dog of Wallace and Gromit fame (1989), but animator Nick Park decided he was more expressive without a voice. However, none of the legendary voices Peter created in his lifetime would have happened if he had not survived the sinking of HMS Limbourne in Canada in 1943. Ironically, Peter died on the same day Doctor Who's first ever Dalek/ Cyberman battle was broadcast in Doomsday (2006). He was married to actress Rosemary Miller.

David Graham (Dalek voice) Born Jul 11 1925
Doctor Who credits
Played: Voice of the Daleks in The Daleks (1963-64), The Dalek Invasion of Earth (1964), The Chase (1965), Dr Who and the Daleks (1965, film), Mission to the Unknown (1965), The Daleks' Master Plan (1965-66), Daleks: Invasion Earth 2150 AD (1966, film)
Played: Voice of the Mechanoids in The Chase (1965)
Played: Charlie in The Gunfighters (1966)
Played: Professor Kerensky in City of Death (1979)
Career highlights
David's acting career began in 1952 with the TV movie Portrait of Peter Perowne, followed by roles in Dial 999 (1959), The Avengers (1963), Danger Man (1965), Late Night Horror (1968), Timeslip (1970-71), Supergirl (1984), Shadow of the Noose (1989), Casualty (2002) and The Fixer (2008). David has also given his vocal skills to many series over the years, including Four Feather Falls (1960, as Fernando and Grandpa Twink), Sara and Hoppity (1962), Supercar (1961-62, as Dr Horatio Beaker, Mitch the Monkey and Bill Gibson), Fireball XL5 (1962-63, as Prof Matthew Matic, Lieutenant Ninety and Zoonie the Lazoon), Stingray (1964-65), Thunderbirds (1965-66, as Gordon Tracy, Parker and Brains), The Secret Service (1969), Space Precinct (1995) and Peppa Pig (2011-12, as Grandpa Pig). He also provided English voices for Moomin (1990) and had a recurring role in the sitcom So Haunt Me (1992-94) as Mr Bloom.

Robert Jewell (Dalek operator) Jan 20 1920 to May 10 1998
Doctor Who credits
Played: Daleks in The Daleks (1963-64), The Dalek Invasion of Earth (1964), The Chase (1965), Dr Who and the Daleks (1965, film), Mission to the Unknown (1965), The Daleks' Master Plan (1965-66), Daleks: Invasion Earth 2150 AD (1966, film), The Power of the Daleks (1966), The Evil of the Daleks (1967), The War Games (1969)
Played: Zarbi in The Web Planet (1965)
Played: Clown in The Daleks' Master Plan (1965-66)
Played: Macra in The Macra Terror (1967)
Career highlights
His other credits include Consider Your Verdict (1962), The Terrornauts (1967), various roles in Prisoner: Cell Block H (1979-86) and The Flying Doctors (1987).

Kevin Manser (Dalek operator) Feb 16 1929 to Dec 21 2001 (bowel cancer)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Daleks in The Daleks (1963-64), The Dalek Invasion of Earth (1964), The Chase (1965), Dr Who and the Daleks (1965, film), Mission to the Unknown (1965), The Daleks' Master Plan (1965-66), The Power of the Daleks (1966)
Played: Zarbi in The Web Planet (1965)
Career highlights
Kevin was born in Australia and after starting his acting career in the UK in the 1960s in series such as The Big Spender (1965) and A Countess from Hong Kong (1967), he returned Down Under in 1969 to continue in series such as Spyforce (1972), Shannon's Mob (1975), A Country Practice (1982), Prisoner: Cell Block H (1983-84), Richmond Hill (1988) and All Saints (2001).
Facts
He wrote his autobiography Memoirs of a Dalek in 2001, a copy of which is part of the Performing Arts Collection of South Australia in Adelaide.

Gerald Taylor (Dalek operator) Oct 11 1940 to Dec 4 1994
Doctor Who credits
Played: Daleks in The Daleks (1963-64), The Dalek Invasion of Earth (1964), The Chase (1965), Dr Who and the Daleks (1965, film), Mission to the Unknown (1965), The Daleks' Master Plan (1965-66), The Power of the Daleks (1966), The Evil of the Daleks (1967)
Played: Zarbi in The Web Planet (1965)
Played: Voice of WOTAN in The War Machines (1966)
Played: War Machines in The War Machines (1966)
Played: Damon's assistant in The Underwater Menace (1967)
Played: Baker's man in The Daemons (1971)
Played: Vega Nexos in The Monster of Peladon (1974)
Career highlights
Gerald's acting career began in Thorndyke (1964), followed by St Ives (1967), Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (1968), The Sex Thief (1974) and Moody and Pegg (1974).

John Scott Martin (Dalek operator) Apr 1 1926 to Jan 6 2009 (Parkinson's Disease)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Zarbi in The Web Planet (1965)
Played: Daleks in The Chase (1965), Mission to the Unknown (1965), The Daleks' Master Plan (1965-66), The Power of the Daleks (1966), The Evil of the Daleks (1967), Day of the Daleks (1972), Frontier in Space (1973), Planet of the Daleks (1973), Death to the Daleks (1974), Genesis of the Daleks (1975), The Five Doctors (1983), Resurrection of the Daleks (1984), Revelation of the Daleks (1985), Remembrance of the Daleks (1988)
Played: Mechanoids in The Chase (1965)
Played: IMC robot in Colony in Space (1971)
Played: Charlie in The Daemons (1971, uncredited)
Played: Mutt in The Mutants (1972)
Played: Gell Guard in The Three Doctors (1972-73)
Played: Hughes in The Green Death (1973)
Played: Reading guard in Robot (1974-75)
Played: Kriz in The Brain of Morbius (1975)
Played: Nucleus in The Invisible Enemy (1977)
Career highlights
John's long career began in 1952's The Life and Death of King John, and went to play usually bit-part roles in Quatermass and the Pit (1958), Ghost Squad (1963), The Likely Lads (1965-66), The Blood Beast Terror (1968), Upstairs, Downstairs (1972), The Good Life (1975), The Duchess of Duke Street (1977), Pink Floyd: The Wall (1982), The Tripods (1984), Erik the Viking (1989), Bullseye! (1990), London's Burning (1991), Ali G Indahouse (2002) and Mine All Mine (2004).
Facts
John also appeared in Catatonia's video for Dead from the Waist Down (1999). In later years he was a church warden and school governor in Essex.

Peter Forbes-Robertson (Guard) Jan 16 1927 to Dec 7 1995
Doctor Who credits
Played: Guard in The Power of the Daleks (1966)
Played: Time Lord in Colony in Space (1971)
Played: Chief Sea Devil in The Sea Devils (1972)
Career highlights
Peter's first credit is in The Case of Charles Peace (1949) and over the years he appeared in Let's Have a Murder (1950), Those People Next Door (1953), Girl in the Headlines (1963), Take a Pair of Private Eyes (1966), Island of Terror (1966), The Persuaders! (1971), Scream... and Die! (1974), Sex Play (1974), Enemy at the Door (1980), The Tripods (1985), The Love Boat (1986) and Foreign Body (1986).
Facts
Little-known fact: Peter provided the spoken word parts on the 1974 ELO album Eldorado.

Robert Russell (Guard) May 24 1936 to May 12 2008 (heart attack)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Guard in The Power of the Daleks (1966)
Played: The Caber in Terror of the Zygons (1975)
Career highlights
In 1947, Kent-born Robert's family moved to South Africa, where he began to work in a gold mine, but he soon moved into acting, debuting in Police Surgeon (1960), The Saint (1966), Inspector Clouseau (1968), Witchfinder General (1968), Orlando (1968), The Guardians (1971), The Protectors (1973), Public Eye (1975), Space: 1999 (1975), Blake's 7 (1978), Sorry! (1981), The Chinese Detective (1982) and Strange Horizons (1993).
Facts
Robert worked in a South African gold mine in the early 1950s.

Robert Luckham (Guard) 1942 to Nov 30 2012
Career highlights
Robert, the son of actor Cyril Luckham (who appeared in Doctor Who as the White Guardian in the 1970s and 80s), had a short CV, which also included The Jazz Age (1968).

Steven Scott (Kebble) Jan 23 1920 to 1981
Career highlights
Debuted in Escape (1957), then The Vise (1958), The Little Ship (1960), Top Secret (1961), The Human Jungle (1963), Orlando (1965), The Three Musketeers (1966), Haunted (1967), The Jazz Age (1968), Carry On Up the Khyber (1968) and Churchill's People (1975).

CREW

David Whitaker (writer) Apr 18 1928 to Feb 4 1980 (cancer)
Doctor Who credits
Story edited:
 An Unearthly Child, The Daleks, The Edge of Destruction, Marco Polo, The Keys of Marinus, The Aztecs, The Sensorites, The Reign of Terror, Planet of Giants, The Dalek Invasion of Earth (1963-64)
Wrote: The Edge of Destruction (1964), The Rescue (1965), The Crusade (1965), The Power of the Daleks (1966), The Evil of the Daleks (1967), The Enemy of the World (1967-68), The Wheel in Space (1968), The Ambassadors of Death (episodes 1-3, 1970)
Career highlights
David was a writer at heart, having begun writing the continuity script on A Christmas Night with the Stars in 1958, followed by Compact (1962), Undermind (1965), Mr Rose (1968), Paul Temple (1970) and Elephant Boy (1973).
Facts
He also wrote the Dalek comic strips in TV Century 21 magazine and the 1965 stage play The Curse of the Daleks. David was the first person to write a novelisation of a Doctor Who story, namely Doctor Who in An Exciting Adventure with the Daleks in 1964. He also novelised The Crusade, but died before completing a novelisation of The Enemy of the World (it was finished by Ian Marter).

Dennis Spooner (writer, final version, uncredited) Dec 1 1932 to Sep 20 1986 (heart attack)
Doctor Who credits
Wrote:
 The Reign of Terror (1964), The Romans (1965), The Time Meddler (1965), The Daleks' Master Plan (episodes 6 & 8-12 based on an idea by Terry Nation, 1965-66), The Power of the Daleks (final version, uncredited, 1966)
Story edited: The Rescue, The Romans, The Web Planet, The Crusade, The Space Museum, The Chase (1965)
Career highlights
Dennis had already written for Coronation Street (1961) before Doctor Who, as well as No Hiding Place (1962) and Hancock (1963). He also wrote for Fireball XL5 (1962-63), Pardon the Expression (1965), Stingray (1964-65), Thunderbirds (1965-66), The Baron (1966-67), Man in a Suitcase (1967-68), The Avengers (1961/68), The Champions (1968-69), Department S (1969-70), Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased) (1969-70), UFO (1970), Paul Temple (1971), Doomwatch (1970-71), Jason King (1971-72), The Protectors (1973), The Adventurer (1972-73), Thriller (1975), The New Avengers (1976-77), The Professionals (1978), Bergerac (1981/83), Remington Steele (1984), Hammer House of Mystery and Suspense (1984) and Dramarama (1986). Dennis was instrumental in creating many ITC series in the 1960s, including Man in a Suitcase, The Champions, Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased), The Adventurer and Department S.
Facts
Dennis had just turned professional for Leyton Orient Football Club when he was called up for National Service in 1950; he was also a keen contract bridge player - often partnering his friend Omar Sharif - and even wrote two books on the subject (Useful Hints for Useless Players and Diary of a Palooka). Before settling on scriptwriting Dennis also tried entertaining himself, as a comedy double act with Leslie Garbon. Dennis was best man at the wedding of telefantasy legend Brian Clemens.

Christopher Barry (director) Sep 20 1925 to Feb 7 2014 (following a fall)
Doctor Who credits
Directed: The Daleks (episodes 1-2 & 4-5, 1963-64), The Rescue (1965), The Romans (1965), The Savages (1966), The Power of the Daleks (1966), The Daemons (1971), The Mutants (1972), Robot (1974-75), The Brain of Morbius (1976), The Creature from the Pit (1979).
Career highlights
His directing career began on an episode of Starr and Company (1958) and through his long career he worked on series such as Private Investigator (1958-59), Take a Pair of Private Eyes (1966), Paul Temple (1970-71), Moonbase 3 (1973), Poldark (1975), Nicholas Nickleby (1977), The Onedin Line (1977), All Creatures Great and Small (1978-80), Juliet Bravo (1981-82) and The Tripods (1984-85). He was also producer on The Net (1962), No Cloak - No Dagger (1962), Broome Stages (1966) and Nanny (1981-83). His earliest TV work was as an uncredited third assistant director on A Run for Your Money (1949).
Facts
Christopher was also one of the many faces used during the mind battle sequence in The Brain of Morbius. In 1995 he directed the straight-to-video fan production Downtime. Christopher died following a fall down an escalator in a Banbury shopping centre.

Innes Lloyd (producer) Dec 24 1925 to Aug 23 1991
Doctor Who credits
Produced: The Celestial Toymaker, The Gunfighters, The Savages, The War Machines, The Smugglers, The Tenth Planet, The Power of the Daleks, The Highlanders, The Underwater Menace, The Moonbase, The Macra Terror, The Faceless Ones, The Evil of the Daleks, The Abominable Snowmen, The Ice Warriors, The Enemy of the World (1966-68)
Career highlights
Doctor Who was his first production job after directing the Eurovision Song Contest for the BBC and the soap United! (1965). Innes went on to produce Waugh on Crime (1970), Dead of Night (1972), The Stone Tape (1972), BBC2 Playhouse (1976-81), The Insurance Man (1986), Talking Heads (1987), Bomber Harris (1989) and A Question of Attribution (1992).
Facts
Along with script editor Gerry Davis, Innes came up with the idea of regeneration. He approached esteemed actors Peter Jeffrey, Ron Moody, Michael Horden and Trevor Howard to replace William Hartnell, before Patrick Troughton accepted the role. Throughout the 1970s and 80s Innes built up a reputation as one of the BBC's most respected producers, and his professional relationship with playwright Alan Bennett was among his most celebrated work. In October 2006, London's Time Out magazine asked Bennett why he no longer wrote for TV: "I think the one decisive factor was that the guy who used to produce all the things for television, Innes Lloyd, died. Innes used to prod you into doing things, and if you had a notion of something, you could go to him and he'd set about making it possible before you'd written it. I was never aware how much wheeling and dealing had to be done. In that sense, he was an ideal producer: he never let you know that it might be quite difficult to get yourself on. But I've felt it since he went; the first thing they talk about is cost and all that stuff." Innes died within days of colleague Gerry Davis.

Gerry Davis (script editor) Feb 23 1930 to Aug 31 1991
Doctor Who credits
Wrote: The Celestial Toymaker (episode 1, 1966, uncredited), The Tenth Planet (1966), The Highlanders (1966-67), The Tomb of the Cybermen (1967), Revenge of the Cybermen (1975)
Script edited: The Massacre of St Bartholomew's Eve (episode 4), The Ark, The Celestial Toymaker, The Gunfighters, The Savages, The War Machines, The Smugglers, The Tenth Planet, The Power of the Daleks, The Highlanders, The Underwater Menace, The Moonbase, The Macra Terror, The Faceless Ones, The Evil of the Daleks (episodes 1-3) (1966-67)
Career highlights
Gerry started out writing for the soap Coronation Street (1960) and also penned for United! (1965), The First Lady (1968), Doomwatch (1970), The Bionic Woman (1976), Vega$ (1979), The Final Countdown (1980), Captain Power and the Soldiers of the Future (1987) and Deadly Nightmares (1989). He also script edited Doomwatch (1970-71) and Softly Softly: Task Force (1971-72).
Facts
In the 1970s, Gerry co-wrote three science-fiction novels with Dr Kit Pedler, and after moving to the USA in the 1970s teamed up with Dalek creator Terry Nation in an unsuccessful bid to buy the rights to make Doctor Who after the BBC ceased its production in 1989. He also taught screenwriting at the UCLA film school in the 1980s. Gerry died within days of colleague Innes Lloyd.

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