Thursday, June 20, 2013

The Reign of Terror

The Doctor (William Hartnell) bargains
with a French shopkeeper (John Barrard)
Six episodes (A Land of Fear, Guests of Madame Guillotine, A Change of Identity, The Tyrant of France, A Bargain of Necessity, Prisoners of Conciergerie)
First broadcast Aug 8 to Sep 12 1964
Average audience for serial: 6.73m
CAST

William Hartnell (The Doctor) Jan 8 1908 to Apr 23 1975 (heart failure after a series of strokes) For a full career biography for William Hartnell, click here.

William Russell (Ian Chesterton) Born Nov 19 1924 For a full career biography for William Russell (aka Russell Enoch), click here.

Jacqueline Hill (Barbara Wright) Dec 17 1929 to Feb 18 1993 (bone cancer) For a full career biography for Jacqueline Hill, click here.

Carole Ann Ford (Susan) Born Jun 8 1940 For a full career biography for Carole Ann Ford, click here.

Keith Anderson (Robespierre) Died 2007
Career highlights
Debuted in a 1957 Armchair Theatre, then took roles in Coronation Street (1961), The Avengers (1961), The Big Pull (1962), Crossroads (1964), Adam Adamant Lives! (1966), Softly Softly (1969), Burke and Hare (1972), Dixon of Dock Green (1975) and Three Minute Heroes (1982).

Tony Wall (Napoleon) Jan 1 1940 to Aug 29 2014
Career highlights
Other work includes No Hiding Place (1961), Thorndyke (1964), Invasion (1965), The Champions (1969), Tales from the Crypt (1972), Asylum (1972) and Vault of Horror (1973).
Facts
In later years he became a carpenter and worked in amateur theatre.

Neville Smith (D'Argenson) Born Jan 1940
Career highlights
Neville's earliest acting credit was in The Odd Man (1963), then Love Story (1965), Softly Softly (1967), Her Majesty's Pleasure (1968), Gumshoe (1971), Red Letter Day (1976), Me! I'm Afraid of Virginia Woolf (1978), World's End (1981), The Comic Strip Presents... (1983), Prick Up Your Ears (1987) and Wish You Were Here (1987). He has also written for radio and TV, including The Golden Vision (1968), Second City Firsts (1974), Bag of Yeast (1976), The World Cup: A Captain's Tale (1982), The Manageress (1989) and Hurricanes (1993-94), as well as the film Gumshoe (1971), for which he was nominated for a BAFTA and won a Writers' Guild Award. He also wrote the infamous Public Information Film Apaches (1977), about children playing on farms.
Facts
Before becoming an actor Neville worked as a teacher, as well as a TV announcer. He was also a sometime tutor at the National Film School of Denmark. Director and collaborator Stephen Frears described Neville as "the best writer I've ever come across". You can read the BFI's biography of Neville here.

Peter Walker (Small boy [Jean Pierre])
Career highlights
Child actor Peter's only other credits were a 1961 adaptation of Chekhov's A Wedding and a 1964 episode of Our Man at St Mark's. Peter trained with the Corona Stage School in Hammersmith, London, although the now folded academy seems to have no record of him.

Laidlaw Dalling (Rouvray) Apr 14 1928 to Oct 9 1982
Career highlights
Other credits include Kidnapped (1956), Emergency Ward 10 (1961), Z Cars (1964), Out of the Unknown (1965), Sergeant Cork (1966) and Love for Lydia (1977).

Robert Hunter (Sergeant)
Career highlights
Robert's acting career began in 1951's Target Unknown and went on to see roles in The 49th Man (1953), Kenilworth (1957), A Time of Day (1957), The Secret Kingdom (1960), Suspense (1963), Softly Softly (1967), three episodes of Mystery and Imagination (1966-68) and The Rough and the Smooth (1975).

Ken Lawrence (Lieutenant)
Ken's only other credits are on 2005 episodes of The Bill and EastEnders. It is not clear whether this is the same man or not (it's doubtful).

James Hall (Soldier) Died Dec 1989
Doctor Who credits
Played: Soldier in The Reign of Terror (1964)
Played: Borkar in The Daleks' Master Plan (1965-66)
Career highlights
Other credits include Z Cars (1968), Paul Temple (1971), No Exit (1972), The Rough with the Smooth (1975), Poldark (1975), The Naked Civil Servant (1975) and Life of Shakespeare (1978).

Howard Charlton (Judge) 1919 to 1975
Career highlights
Other credits include The Handy Gang (1963), Public Eye (1965), two Wednesday Plays (1965/67), Softly Softly: Task Force (1971) and Thank You Very Much (1971).

Jack Cunningham (Jailer) 1912 to Jan 13 1967
Career highlights
Jack debuted in Dial M for Murder (1954), then The Count of Monte Cristo (1956), Ivanhoe (1958), The Pursuers (1961), The Snake Woman (1961), The Quare Fellow (1962), Dr Finlay's Casebook (1965/66) and The Dick Emery Show (1966).
Facts
Although born in England, Jack spent much of his life in Ireland where he had a highly-acclaimed career in amateur theatrics. In the late 1940s/ early 1950s, a production of John Millington Synge's The Playboy of the Western World by the Ballina Players of Co. Mayo, of which he was a member, was such a success that a BBC producer wanted it to be shown on TV, but being amateurs, many of the players could not be released from their day jobs to take part, and the project was abandoned.

Jeffry Wickham (Webster) Aug 5 1933 to Jun 17 2014
Career highlights
Jeffry's career began in 1960's An Age of Kings, followed by Object Z (1965), The Ugliest Girl in Town (1968), Jason King (1971), Edward the Seventh (1975), The Brothers (1976), Sapphire and Steel (1981), Blott on the Landscape (1985), Clockwise (1986), The Remains of the Day (1993), CI5: The New Professionals (1999), Ali G Indahouse (2002), Vera Drake (2004), Scoop (2006) and Black Mirror (2011).
Facts
Fluent Russian speaker Jeffrey was the president of actors' union Equity between 1992-94. His children Saskia and Rupert Wickham are also actors.

Dallas Cavell (Roadworks overseer) Sep 19 1925 to Feb 15 1993
Doctor Who credits
Played: Roadworks overseer in The Reign of Terror (1964)
Played: Bors in The Daleks' Master Plan (1965-66)
Played: Captain Jebb Trask in The Highlanders (1966)
Played: Quinlan in The Ambassadors of Death (1970)
Played: Head of security in Castrovalva (1982)
Career highlights
Dallas (real first name Norman) debuted in The Voodoo Factor (1960), then Maigret (1961), The Avengers (1963), Crossroads (1964), The Caesars (1968), Brett (1971), The New Avengers (1976) and The Pickwick Papers (1985).
Facts
Dallas also worked as a bingo caller in London for a time.

Denis Cleary (Peasant) Feb 21 1927 to Nov 21 1984
Career highlights
Debuted in The Rebel Heiress (1958), then The Splendid Spur (1960), The Men from Room 13 (1961), West End Jungle (1961), The Avengers (1962), The Massingham Affair (1964), King of the River (1966), Counterstrike (1969), The Troubleshooters (1971), The Brothers (1974) and Nigel Kneale's Beasts (1976).
Facts
In later years Denis became an author. One of his books was a comedy Western called Shameless, published in 1971 which was optioned for a film adaptation that never happened by Peter Collinson, director of The Italian Job. The book sold 10,000 copies, and demand for a reprint prompted Denis's widow Joan to republish it in 2016. Other titles included The Rattler, and three books with Frank Maher (also a stuntman): Sahara Strike, Capricorn Run and Wipeout.

James Cairncross (Lemaitre) Dec 21 1915 to Dec 17 2009
Doctor Who credits
Played: Lemaitre in The Reign of Terror (1964)
Played: Beta in The Krotons (1968-69)
Career highlights
Other credits include The Old Lady Shows Her Medals (1952), Kidnapped (1956), Run to Earth (1958), Jango (1961), Ask Mr Pastry (1961), The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner (1962), Tom Jones (1963), Adam Adamant Lives! (1966), Edna, the Inebriate Woman (1971), Van Der Valk (1972), Slater's Day (1974), Crown Court (1973/75), Sutherland's Law (1975), Airport Chaplain (1980), Small World (1988), Taggart (1988) and The Fool (1990). As well as appearing in various Mr Pastry series, James also wrote many scripts for the character, including Mr Pastry's Progress and Mr Pastry's Pet Shop (both 1962).
Facts
Devout Catholic James made no fewer than 16 appearances at the Edinburgh Festival during his career, and was also a gifted lyricist, instrumental in the success of the musical Salad Days when it debuted in 1954 at the Bristol Old Vic.

Roy Herrick (Jean) Jul 22 1936 to Oct 11 1988
Doctor Who credits
Played: Jean in The Reign of Terror (1964)
Played: Voice of Xoanon in The Face of Evil (1977)
Played: Parsons in The Invisible Enemy (1977)
Career highlights
Roy's further work included The Spread of the Eagle (1963), Object Z (1965), Macbeth (1970), Public Eye (1971), Colditz (1974), Survivors (1976), George and Mildred (1979), Tenko (1981), Fresh Fields (1984) and Howards' Way (1985). He regularly played Jeffrey Sissons in The Regiment (1972-73).

Donald Morley (Jules Renan) Jun 9 1923 to May 27 1999
Career highlights
Donald's long career began in The Infinite Shoeblack (1952), followed by roles in Sword of Freedom (1957), Destination Downing Street (1957), The World of Tim Frazer (1960), Crane (1963), The Human Jungle (1964), The Mask of Janus (1965), The Saint (1967), The Queen Street Gang (1968), Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased) (1969), Doomwatch (1970), Dad's Army (1974), Dominic (1976), The Sweeney (1978), Reilly: Ace of Spies (1983), All Creatures Great and Small (1988), Grace and Favour (1993) and The Brittas Empire (1994). He may also be remembered as Mr Gill the stationmaster in the 1957 TV adaptation of The Railway Children, and Morris in Freewheelers (1972).
Facts
Donald's wife was stage actress Marianne Morley.

John Barrard (Shopkeeper) 1924 to Oct 13 2013 (natural causes)
Career highlights
John's CV starts with The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956) and includes The Larkins (1958), Cover Girl Killer (1959), The Saint (1962), Dr Finlay's Casebook (1965), Pardon the Expression (1966), The Troubleshooters (1966), The Avengers (1969), If It Moves, File It (1970), Here Come the Double Deckers! (1970), Budgie (1972), The Fenn Street Gang (1971-72), The Sweeney (1976), Survivors (1977), Dick Turpin (1980), Metal Mickey (1980-82), Whoops Apocalypse (1982), The Black Adder (1983), Santa Claus: The Movie (1985), Never the Twain (1986-87), Buster (1988), One Foot in the Grave (1990), Minder (1993), Mr Bean (1994), Sunburn (2000), Doctors (2002), The 10th Man (2006) and Swinging with the Finkels (2011). He had a regular role as Ron Coggins in Mike (1964) and played Mr Pebbles to Eileen Way's Mrs Pebbles in Sean's Show (1992).
Facts
There's a lovely video tribute to the work of John Barrard created by his great great nephew Joe Davies here.

Caroline Hunt (Danielle)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Danielle in The Reign of Terror (1964)
Played: Technician in Frontier in Space (1973)
Career highlights
Other appearances include 199 Park Lane (1965), Detective (1968), The Remains of the Day (1993) and Casualty (1999). Caroline is now a theatre director and acting workshop trainer. In 2013 she became involved with the Dark Mountain Project.

Edward Brayshaw (Leon Colbert) Oct 18 1933 to Dec 28 1990 (throat cancer)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Leon Colbert in The Reign of Terror (1964)
Played: War Chief in The War Games (1969)
Career highlights
Edward's CV began with Trip-Tease and High C's (1959), then Mine Own Executioner (1960), 633 Squadron (1964), the title character in A Man Called Harry Brent (1965), Virgin of the Secret Service (1968), The Avengers (1969), Moonbase 3 (1973), Great Expectations (1974), The Changes (1975), Return of the Saint (1979), The Bill (1984) and Bergerac (1989). He also played Rochefort in The Three Musketeers and The Further Adventures of the Three Musketeers (1966-67), and will be best remembered as Harold Meaker in Rentaghost (1976-84).

Ronald Pickup (Physician) Born Jun 7 1940
Career highlights
Ronald's long career began with Doctor Who (for which he earnt £30!), followed by Much Ado About Nothing (1967), The Day of the Jackal (1973), Jennie: Lady Randolph Churchill (1974), The Philanthropist (1975), Zulu Dawn (1979), Verdi (1982), Never Say Never Again (1983), Moving (1985), The Mission (1986), Fortunes of War (1987), Not with a Bang (1990), The Golden Years (1992), Medics (1994), Lolita (1997), Waking the Dead (2002), Feather Boy (2004), Sea of Souls (2006), Dark Floors (2008), Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time (2010), The Jury (2011), The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (2011), Parade's End (2012), Pramface (2013), Young Dracula (2014), Atlantis (2014), The Second Best Exotic marigold Hotel (2014), Downton Abbey (2015) and Vera (2016). Ronald will more recently be recognised as Fraser in The Worst Week of My Life (2004-06) and Lord Charles Byrne in Holby City (2002-07), and his voice may be familiar to fans of the BBC's Chronicles of Narnia stories, in which he played Aslan (1988-90).
Facts
Doctor Who was Ronald's first TV role, for which he was paid £30. His daughter is actress Rachel Pickup.

Terry Bale (Soldier) Mar 8 1928 to 2013
Doctor Who credits
Played: Soldier in The Reign of Terror (1964)
Played: Voice of Arcturus in The Curse of Peladon (1972)
Career highlights
Further credits include The Seven Faces of Jim (1961), King of the River (1966), The Revenue Men (1967), Doomwatch (1971), Warship (1973), The Sweeney (1975), 1990 (1977) and Grange Hill (1980).

John Law (Paul Barrass)
Career highlights
John's other credits include Potts and the Night Whistlers (1957), Gilbert and Sullivan: The Immortal Jesters (1961), Z Cars (1962), Thorndyke (1964), Adam Adamant Lives! (1966), Doomwatch (1970) and The Protectors (1974). He also played Chief Superintendent Dunkerley in Softly Softly (1966-67).

Patrick Marley (Soldier)
Career highlights
Patrick's other credits include Z Cars (1963/71), Lillie (1978), Julius Caesar (1979), A Married Man (1983), Lytton's Diary (1985), Bottle Boys (1985), Sorry! (1988), The House of Eliott (1991), Unnatural Pursuits (1992), The 10th Kingdom (2000) and Relative Values (2000). He also played Barry Hughes in the soap Crossroads (1966).
Facts
Patrick conceived and starred in Wilde at Heart, a touring stage production in the style of Japanese kabuki theatre about Oscar Wilde, and has also appeared at Cheltenham Literary Festival reading Wilde's letters alongside the writer's grandson, Merlin Hollind.

CREW

Dennis Spooner (writer) Dec 1 1932 to Sep 20 1986 (heart attack)
Doctor Who credits
Wrote: The Reign of Terror (1964), The Romans (1965), The Time Meddler (1965), The Daleks' Master Plan (episodes 6 & 8-12 based on an idea by Terry Nation, 1965-66), The Power of the Daleks (final version, uncredited, 1966)
Story edited: The Rescue, The Romans, The Web Planet, The Crusade, The Space Museum, The Chase (1965)
Career highlights
Dennis had already written for Coronation Street (1961) before Doctor Who, as well as No Hiding Place (1962) and Hancock (1963). He also wrote for Fireball XL5 (1962-63), Pardon the Expression (1965), Stingray (1964-65), Thunderbirds (1965-66), The Baron (1966-67), Man in a Suitcase (1967-68), The Avengers (1961/68), The Champions (1968-69), Department S (1969-70), Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased) (1969-70), UFO (1970), Paul Temple (1971), Doomwatch (1970-71), Jason King (1971-72), The Protectors (1973), The Adventurer (1972-73), Thriller (1975), The New Avengers (1976-77), The Professionals (1978), Bergerac (1981/83), Remington Steele (1984), Hammer House of Mystery and Suspense (1984) and Dramarama (1986). Dennis was instrumental in creating many ITC series in the 1960s, including Man in a Suitcase, The Champions, Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased), The Adventurer and Department S.
Facts
Dennis had just turned professional for Leyton Orient Football Club when he was called up for National Service in 1950; he was also a keen contract bridge player - often partnering his friend Omar Sharif - and even wrote two books on the subject (Useful Hints for Useless Players and Diary of a Palooka). Before settling on scriptwriting Dennis also tried entertaining himself, as a comedy double act with Leslie Garbon. Dennis was best man at the wedding of telefantasy legend Brian Clemens.

Henric Hirsch (director, episodes 1-2 & 4-6) Died post-1994
Career highlights
Henric also directed First Night (1964), two Wednesday Plays (1965-66), Virgin of the Secret Service (1968), Confession (1970) and Crossroads (1973), and also acted in an episode of The Spies (1966).
Facts
Principally a theatre director, Hungarian refugee Henric was called in to direct the majority of The Reign of Terror after the intended director Gerald Blake couldn't commit. Henric was reportedly less than keen working on Doctor Who, and as well as having problems getting along with William Hartnell, fell ill. On July 24th 1964, on the day episode three was due to be recorded, Henric collapsed from exhaustion and was replaced for the episode by John Gorrie. Henric returned to complete episodes 4-6 of the serial, although many directorial duties were assumed by production assistant Timothy Combe. Henric left the BBC soon after, and returned to the theatre. In 1973, he adapted Ferenc Molnar's The Wolf for a production at the Apollo Theatre in London (starring Judi Dench, Leo McKern and Edward Woodward). Henric's fate is uncertain, although it is known he was living in retirement in Australia in 1994, but that he has died since.

John Gorrie (director) Born Aug 11 1932
Doctor Who credits
Directed: The Keys of Marinus (1964) and The Reign of Terror (episode 3, 1964)
Career highlights
John's long directing career began in 1962 on Compact, then Thorndyke (1964), Out of the Unknown (1965-66), Angels (1975), Within These Walls (1975-78), Rumpole of the Bailey (1975-92), Tales of the Unexpected (1980-88), Shroud for a Nightingale (1984), Perfect Scoundrels (1991-92), The Famous Five (1995-97), Animal Ark (1997-98) and The Coral Island (2000). John has also written for series such as Edward the Seventh (1975), Lillie (1978) and Marjorie and Men (1985), and even had a crack at acting, appearing in Sat'day While Sunday (1967).
Awards
1976: BAFTA TV Award for Best Drama Series/ Serial (Edward the Seventh)
In 2013 Toby Hadoke released his Who's Round interview with John, along with members of the cast of The Keys of Marinus, here.

Verity Lambert (producer) Nov 27 1935 to Nov 22 2007 (cancer)
Doctor Who credits
Produced: An Unearthly Child, The Daleks, The Edge of Destruction, Marco Polo, The Keys of Marinus, The Aztecs, The Sensorites, The Reign of Terror, Planet of Giants, The Dalek Invasion of Earth, The Rescue, The Romans, The Web Planet, The Crusade, The Space Museum, The Chase, The Time Meddler, Galaxy 4, Mission to the Unknown (1963-65)
Career highlights
Doctor Who was Verity's first producing job on TV, quite an achievement for a woman of 28, and during her first months was accompanied by the more experienced Mervyn Pinfield as associate producer. Verity left the series to produce The Newcomers (1965), Adam Adamant Lives! (1966-67), Detective (1968), various Somerset Maugham adaptations (1969-70), Budgie (1971-72), Between the Wars (1973), Shoulder to Shoulder (1974), The Naked Civil Servant (1975), Rock Follies (1976), Couples (1975-76), The Norman Conquests (1977), Quatermass (1979), Fox (1980), Widows (1983), Reilly: Ace of Spies (1983), Minder (1979-84), Dreamchild (1985), Clockwise (1986), A Cry in the Dark (1988), Evil Angels (1988), GBH (1991), Eldorado (1992-93), So Haunt Me (1992-94), May to December (1989-94), She's Out (1995), Class Act (1995), Jonathan Creek (1998-2004), The Cazalets (2001) and Love Soup (2005-08).
Awards
1970: BAFTA TV Award for Best Drama Series (W. Somerset Maugham)
1989: Australian Film Institute Award for Best Film (Evil Angels)
1997: British Film Institute Fellowship
2002: Officer of the order of the British Empire (OBE) for services to film and television
Facts
Verity was married to director Colin Bucksey between 1973-87.

Mervyn Pinfield (associate producer) Feb 28 1912 to May 20 1966
Doctor Who credits
Associate producer: An Unearthly Child, The Daleks, The Edge of Destruction, Marco Polo, The Keys of Marinus, The Aztecs, The Sensorites, The Reign of Terror, Planet of Giants, The Dalek Invasion of Earth, The Rescue, The Romans (1963-65)
Directed: The Sensorites (episodes 1-4, 1964), Planet of Giants (episodes 1-3, 1964), The Space Museum (1965)
Career highlights
Mervyn was a BBC stalwart, joining the Corporation in the 1950s to produce live drama at Alexandra Palace. He was coupled with Verity Lambert to watch over the cub producer in her early days. His previous credits included directing Saturday Playhouse (1960), Compact (1962) and The Monsters (1962).
Facts
He was the inventor of a very early version of the Teleprompter or Autocue called the Piniprompter. He died almost exactly a year after his final work on Doctor Who.

David Whitaker (story editor) Apr 18 1928 to Feb 4 1980 (cancer)
Doctor Who credits
Story edited: An Unearthly Child, The Daleks, The Edge of Destruction, Marco Polo, The Keys of Marinus, The Aztecs, The Sensorites, The Reign of Terror, Planet of Giants, The Dalek Invasion of Earth (1963-64)
Wrote: The Edge of Destruction (1964), The Rescue (1965), The Crusade (1965), The Power of the Daleks (1966), The Evil of the Daleks (1967), The Enemy of the World (1967-68), The Wheel in Space (1968), The Ambassadors of Death (episodes 1-3, 1970)
Career highlights
David was a writer at heart, having begun writing the continuity script on A Christmas Night with the Stars in 1958, followed by Compact (1962), Undermind (1965), Mr Rose (1968), Paul Temple (1970) and Elephant Boy (1973).
Facts
He also wrote the Dalek comic strips in TV Century 21 magazine and the 1965 stage play The Curse of the Daleks. David was the first person to write a novelisation of a Doctor Who story, namely Doctor Who in An Exciting Adventure with the Daleks in 1964. He also novelised The Crusade, but died before completing a novelisation of The Enemy of the World (it was finished by Ian Marter).

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3 comments:

  1. On Find My Past/Ancestry, I've found a Henrich Hirsch who was born on 13 November 1923 and died in March 1999 in London. There's also a Henry Hirsch with the same information. Through a Family Tree Search on AC, there are two entries, one for Henry and the other for Henric (no h at the end) and it gives his birthplace as Hungary - where the director came from! Could this be our man? If so, why would he be down under in 1994? Second/holiday home? Visiting friends/family? Maybe he returned to England, alternating between the two places and died in the UK. He might have still kept in touch with his neighbours, which is why that one said he'd died.

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  2. Where did the Jan 1 1940 birth date for Tony Wall turn up? It wasn't available earlier this year when he died, but it's good that it has now surfaced. That means he was only 24 when he played Napoleon in this story. It was a good performance.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Family Tree Search on Ancestry (as Anthony Denham Wall - the date of death is the same).

      Delete

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