Saturday, June 28, 2014

Pyramids of Mars

Marcus Scarman (Bernard Archard),
Sarah Jane Smith (Elisabeth Sladen),
a possessed Doctor (Tom Baker) and
a mummy in the TARDIS
Four episodes (Part One, Part Two, Part Three, Part Four)
First broadcast Oct 25 to Nov 15 1975
Average audience for serial: 10.73m

CAST

Tom Baker (The Doctor) Born Jan 20 1934
Doctor Who credits
Played: The Doctor in Robot, The Ark in Space, The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, Planet of Evil, Pyramids of Mars, The Android Invasion, The Brain of Morbius, The Seeds of Doom, The Masque of Mandragora, The Hand of Fear, The Deadly Assassin, The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang, Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers, Underworld, The Invasion of Time, The Ribos Operation, The Pirate Planet, The Stones of Blood, The Androids of Tara, The Power of Kroll, The Armageddon Factor, Destiny of the Daleks, City of Death, The Creature from the Pit, Nightmare of Eden, The Horns of Nimon, Shada (unbroadcast), The Leisure Hive, Meglos, Full Circle, State of Decay, Warriors' Gate, The Keeper of Traken, Logopolis (1974-81). Return appearances in The Five Doctors (1983, archive footage), Dimensions in Time (1993), The Day of the Doctor (2013, as The Curator - but I think we all know who he was really!).
Tom also played the Doctor in the 1975 audio story Doctor Who and the Pescatons, and in several BBC and Big Finish audios since 2009.
Played: Meglos in Meglos (1980)
Career highlights
Tom's career began with a 1968 adaptation of The Winter's Tale, followed by roles in George and the Dragon (1968), Z Cars (1968), Softly Softly (1970), Nicholas and Alexandra (1971), The Canterbury Tales (1972), The Vault of Horror (1973), The Golden Voyage of Sinbad (1973), The Mutations (1974), Piccadilly Circus (1977), Late Night Story (1978), The Book Tower (1979-81), The Curse of King Tut's Tomb (1980), The Hound of the Baskervilles (1982, as Sherlock Holmes), Jemima Shore Investigates (1983), Remington Steele (1984), Blackadder II (1986), Roland Rat: The Series (1986), The Kenny Everett Television Show (1986), The Life and Loves of a She-Devil (1986), The Silver Chair (1990), Selling Hitler (1991), The Law Lord (1992), Cluedo (1992), Backtime (1998), Max Bear (2000), Dungeons and Dragons (2000), Fun at the Funeral Parlour (2001), Strange (2003), Fort Boyard (2003), Swiss Toni (2003), The Magic Roundabout (2005), Agatha Christie's Marple (2007), The Beeps (2007-08) and The Genie in the Bottle (2010). Tom has also had regular roles as Prof Geoffrey Hoyt in Medics (1992-95), Professor Wyvern in Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased) (2000-01) and Donald MacDonald in Monarch of the Glen (2004-05). He is probably most famous in his latter career for providing the eccentric narration for sketch series Little Britain between 2003-08.
Facts
Tom left home at 15 to become a monk with the Brothers of Ploermel on Jersey, but abandoned this profession at the age of 21 in favour of National Service. In 1971 Tom was nominated for two Golden Globe Awards for his portrayal of Rasputin in Nicholas and Alexandra (he was beaten by Ben Johnson and Desi Arnaz Jr). In December 1980 he married actress Lalla Ward (who had been companion Romana in Doctor Who since 1979), but the marriage ended 18 months later. He married third wife Sue Jerrard in 1986, previously an assistant editor on Doctor Who. Tom's old drinking buddies in the 1960s and 70s included artist Francis Bacon at the infamous Colony Room. Tom has several links to popular music - appearing on Technocat's single Only Human (1995), and providing a monologue on Witness to a Murder (Part Two) by Mansun (1998 - his Doctor and the TARDIS also appeared on the cover of the band's album Six). Pop band The Human League released a song entitled Tom Baker in 1980. In 1999 Tom published a short fairytale novel called The Boy Who Kicked Pigs, which has since been adapted for the stage. Tom's distinctive vocals can also be heard at various tourist attractions in the UK, such as the London Dungeon, Natural History Museum and Alton Towers' Nemesis ride. In 2006 Tom recorded 11,593 phrases so his voice could be used for BT's text messaging service to raise money for homeless charity Shelter - as a result record producer Mark Murphy created a single of Tom "singing" You Really Got Me by the Kinks.

Elisabeth Sladen (Sarah Jane Smith) Feb 1 1946 to Apr 19 2011 (pancreatic cancer)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Sarah Jane Smith in The Time Warrior (1973-74), Invasion of the Dinosaurs (1974), Death to the Daleks (1974), The Monster of Peladon (1974), Planet of the Spiders (1974), Robot (1974-75), The Ark in Space (1975), The Sontaran Experiment (1975), Genesis of the Daleks (1975), Revenge of the Cybermen (1975), Terror of the Zygons (1975), Planet of Evil (1975), Pyramids of Mars (1975), The Android Invasion (1975), The Brain of Morbius (1976), The Seeds of Doom (1976), The Masque of Mandragora (1976), The Hand of Fear (1976), K9 & Company (1981), The Five Doctors (1983), Dimensions in Time (1993), School Reunion (2006), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Invasion of the Bane (2007), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Revenge of the Slitheen (2007), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Eye of the Gorgon (2007), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Warriors of Kudlak (2007), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Whatever Happened to Sarah Jane? (2007), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Lost Boy (2007), The Stolen Earth/ Journey's End (2008), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Last Sontaran (2008), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Day of the Clown (2008), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Secrets of the Stars (2008), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Mark of the Berserker (2008), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Temptation of Sarah Jane Smith (2008), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Enemy of the Bane (2008), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Prisoner of the Judoon (2009), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Mad Woman in the Attic (2009), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Wedding of Sarah Jane Smith (2009), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Eternity Trap (2009), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Mona Lisa's Revenge (2009), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Gift (2009), The End of Time Part Two (2010), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Nightmare Man (2010), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Vault of Secrets (2010), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Death of the Doctor (2010), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Empty Planet (2010), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Lost in Time (2010), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Goodbye, Sarah Jane Smith (2010), The Sarah Jane Adventures: Sky (2011), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Curse of Clyde Langer (2011), The Sarah Jane Adventures: The Man Who Never Was (2011).
Elisabeth also played Sarah in the 1975 audio story Doctor Who and the Pescatons, two BBC Radio stories - The Paradise of Death (1993) and The Ghosts of N-Space (1996) - and the fan video production Downtime (1995), as well as reprising the role for various Big Finish audio plays.
Career highlights
Elisabeth's earliest (uncredited) role was in Ferry Cross the Mersey (1965), then Coronation Street (1970), Z Cars (1971/72), Doomwatch (1972), Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em (1973), Hickory House (1973), Merry-Go-Round (1977), Send in the Girls (1978), Take My Wife (1979), Silver Dream Racer (1980), In Loving Memory (1980), Name for the Day (1980), Gulliver in Lilliput (1982), Dempsey and Makepeace (1985), Alice in Wonderland (1986), The Bill (1989), Men of the World (1994), Peak Practice (1996) and Faith in the Future (1996).
Facts
She was married to actor Brian Miller, also a Doctor Who alumni. Elisabeth appeared alongside seven of the TV Doctors (Doctors 1-5 either during her own era or in The Five Doctors, plus the Tenth and Eleventh Doctors in either 21st century Doctor Who or her own spin-off series). The Impossible Astronaut (2011) was dedicated to Elisabeth on its transmission, while a special programme entitled My Sarah Jane: A Tribute to Elisabeth Sladen aired on Children's BBC. BBC4 also repeated The Hand of Fear (1976) as a tribute.

Bernard Archard (Marcus Scarman) Aug 20 1916 to May 1 2008
Doctor Who credits
Played: Bragen in The Power of the Daleks (1966)
Played: Marcus Scarman in Pyramids of Mars (1975)
Career highlights
Bernard's career stems back as far as The Immortal Lady (1948) and includes For the Children (1948), The Adventures of Annabel (1955), Kenilworth (1957) and takes in Mary Britten, MD (1958), Corridors of Blood (1958), Village of the Damned (1960), Sir Francis Drake (1962), The List of Adrian Messenger (1963), Sergeant Cork (1964), Out of the Unknown (1966), The Spy with a Cold Nose (1966), The Avengers (1965/68), Callan (1969), Manhunt (1970), The Horror of Frankenstein (1970), Dad's Army (1971), The Day of the Jackal (1973), Get Some In! (1975), Sky (1975), Dick Turpin (1979), The Sea Wolves (1980), Krull (1983), Bergerac (1985/87) and Keeping Up Appearances (1991). He also had regular roles as Oreste Pinto in Spy-Catcher (1959-61), General Plaski in The Midnight Men (1964), Ian the editor in Lytton's Diary (1985-86) and Leonard Kempinski in soap Emmerdale (1992-94).
Facts
Bernard, who was a conscientious objector during the Second World War, celebrated a civil partnership with his partner of 60 years, fellow actor Jim Belchamber, in 2006.

Michael Sheard (Laurence Scarman) Jun 18 1938 to Aug 31 2005 (cancer)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Rhos in The Ark (1966)
Played: Dr Summers in The Mind of Evil (1971)
Played: Laurence Scarman in Pyramids of Mars (1975)
Played: Lowe in The Invisible Enemy (1977)
Played: Mergrave in Castrovalva (1982)
Played: Headmaster in Remembrance of the Daleks (1988)
Career highlights
Michael was a prolific character actor, appearing in over 120 productions, starting in a 1962 episode of Suspense. Further roles included The Likely Lads (1965), Adam Adamant Lives! (1966), The Borderers (1969), Albert! (1969), Paul Temple (1971), The Onedin Line (1972), On the Buses (1973), The Sweeney (1975), Space: 1999 (1975), The Tomorrow People (1978), Blake's 7 (1980), The Empire Strikes Back (1980), The Outsider (1983), Auf Wiedersehen, Pet (1983-84), The Invisible Man (1984), Hannay (1988), Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989), 'Allo 'Allo (1992), Takin' Over the Asylum (1994), Another Life (2001), The Green Door (2005) and Shadows in the Woods (2006). Michael had a regular role as Mr Bronson in children's school series Grange Hill (1985-89).
Facts
During his career, he played Adolf Hitler five times, and Heinrich Himmler three times. He acted alongside five Doctors in the TV series, and a sixth (Paul McGann) in audio story The Stones of Venice (2001). Michael was the one to formally identify actor Declan Mulholland at the police mortuary after he was found dead on a train (as well as being the original actor to play Jabba the Hutt in a scene deleted from Star Wars, Declan also appeared in the Doctor Who stories The Sea Devils and The Androids of Tara).

Gabriel Woolf (Sutekh) Born Oct 2 1932
Doctor Who credits
Played: Sutekh in Pyramids of Mars (1975)
Played: Voice of the Beast in The Impossible Planet/ The Satan Pit (2006)
Career highlights
Gabriel was first credited in The Boy with a Cart (1951), then appeared in Knights of the Round Table (1953), Rob Roy (1961), Emergency Ward 10 (1961), Honey Lane (1969), Paul Temple (1971), Look and Read: The Boy from Space (1971), The Brothers (1972), Dial M for Murder (1974), Bognor (1981), The Prisoner of Zenda (1984) and Wizards vs Aliens (2012-13).
Facts
He is married to opera singer Dame Felicity Lott, who sang at the wedding of the Duke and Duchess of York in 1986. In 1981 Gabriel read three Doctor Who novelisations as RNIB talking books (imagine a bedtime story read to you by Sutekh!).

Peter Copley (Dr Warlock) May 20 1915 to Oct 7 2008
Career highlights
Peter's career was massively prolific, with well over 130 appearences. It all began with Tell Me If It Hurts (1934) after making his stage debut two years earlier, followed by roles in Golden Salamander (1950), The Pickwick Papers (1952), The Sword and the Rose (1953), David Copperfield (1956), A Tale of Two Cities (1958), The Strange World of Planet X (1958), The Naked Lady (1959), Follow That Horse! (1960), Victim (1961), Hamlet (1961), Thorndyke (1964), Help! (1965), The Knack... and How to Get It (1965), The Forsyte Saga (1967), Quatermass and the Pit (1967), The Shoes of the Fisherman (1968), Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed (1969), Doomwatch (1970), All At Sea (1970), Callan (1972), The Long Chase (1972), The Dragon's Opponent (1973), The Venturers (1975), Sky (1976), Bill Brand (1976), The Famous Five (1978), The Foundation (1977-78), Flambards (1979), The Chinese Detective (1982), The Gathering Seed (1983), Empire of the Sun (1987), Hot Metal (1998), One Foot in the Grave (1990), Grange Hill (1993), Cadfael (1994), Wives and Daughters (1999), Strange (2002), The Last Detective (2003), Riot at the Rite (2005) and The Colour of Magic (2008).
Facts
Off screen, Peter was a sharp-witted law expert and part-time attorney who successfully handled several court cases in the 1960s. He was also on the board of directors of the Bristol Old Vic Theatre Trust. In November 2001 he was awarded an honorary Master of Arts degree by the University of West England in recognition of his career and dedication to regional theatre. His parents were lithographer and printmaker John Copley and artist Ethel Gabain. Peter's first wife was actress Pamela Brown (who divorced him in 1953 for infidelity); his third wife was the writer Margaret Tabor.

Peter Mayock (Namin) May 31 1940 to Dec 15 1998
Doctor Who credits
Played: Namin in Pyramids of Mars (1975)
Played: Solis in The Deadly Assassin (1976)
Career highlights
Peter made his debut in The Wright People (1959), then Triton (1961), The Face of Fu Manchu (1965), Ulysses (1967), Emmerdale Farm (1972), My Old Man (1974-75) and Spend Spend Spend (1977).

Michael Bilton (Collins) Dec 14 1919 to Nov 5 1993
Doctor Who credits
Played: Teligny in The Massacre of St Bartholomew's Eve (1966)
Played: Collins in Pyramids of Mars (1975)
Played: Time Lord in The Deadly Assassin (1976)
Career highlights
Michael's first credit is in Sing Along With Me (1952), and over the course of his career he appeared in Quatermass II (1955), A Taste of Honey (1961), The Mind of the Enemy (1965), The Prisoner (1967), The Avengers (1968), Doctor at Large (1971), The Fenn Street Gang (1973), South Riding (1974), The Haunting of Julia (1977), The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin (1977), Pennies from Heaven (1978), Bognor (1981), Brideshead Revisited (1981), Coronation Street (1983), The Fourth Protocol (1987), The New Statesman (1990) and the Alleyn Mysteries (1993). He had memorable roles as Ned in To the Manor Born (1979-81), Mr Thorpe in Grace and Favour (1992-93) and Basil Makepeace in Waiting for God (1990-93). He may also be remembered for playing an elderly gardener in a TV commercial for Yellow Pages.
Facts
Crippling arthritis prevented him from working on stage toward the end of his career. While serving in World War Two, he was wounded in the stomach at the Battle of El Alamein.

Vik Tablian (Ahmed) Born Oct 10 1937
Career highlights
Doctor Who was Jerusalem-born Vik's credited debut, after which he appeared in Midnight Express (1978), The Assassination Run (1980), Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), Auf Wiedersehen, Pet (1983), EastEnders (1985), Navy Seals (1990), The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles (1992), The Knock (1999), Between Iraq and a Hard Place (2003), The Bill (2007) and The Promise (2016).

Nick Burnell (Mummy)
Career highlights
Nick later appeared in Crown Court (1982), The Tripods (1984), 'Allo 'Allo! (1987), Press Gang (1990), Hancock (1991), Second Thoughts (1992), Waiting for God (1993), Bring Me the Head of Mavis Davis (1997), Bad Girls (2001), Keen Eddie (2004), Diamond Geezer (2005) and Footballers' Wives (2005).
Facts
He is also an experienced drama teacher. 

Kevin Selway (Mummy) Born Jan 24 1953
Kevin's only other credit was Return of the Saint (1978). 

Melvyn Bedford (Mummy)
Doctor Who credits
Played: Reig in Planet of Evil (1975)
Played: Mummy in Pyramids of Mars (1975)
Career highlights
His further credits include Waiting for God (1993), Casualty (1994), Peak Practice (1998), EastEnders (2000) and In Deep (2001).

George Tovey (Ernie Clements) Mar 8 1914 to Dec 4 1982
Career highlights
George first appeared in Quatermass II (1955), then O.S.S (1957), Black Ice (1957), Expresso Bongo (1958), Life in Emergency Ward 10 (1959), The Army Game (1959), Colonel Trumper's Private War (1961), The Dickie Henderson Show (1963), The Valiant Varneys (1964), Crooks in Cloisters (1964), Barney is My Darling (1965-66), Poor Cow (1967), Mum's Boys (1968), Detective (1968), Steptoe and Son (1963/65/70), Budgie (1971-72), Frenzy (1972), Baxter! (1973), The Dick Emery Show (1972-73), My Old Man (1974-75), Yus My Dear (1976), Citizen Smith (1977), Mind Your Language (1978), The Fall and Rise of Reginald Perrin (1978), Minder (1979), A Fine Romance (1981-82), The Kenny Everett Television Show (1982) and The Wicked Lady (1983).
Facts
George is the father of actress Roberta Tovey, who played Susan to Peter Cushing's Dr Who in the two 1960s Doctor Who movies.

CREW

Lewis Greifer (writer) Dec 19 1915 to Mar 18 2003 (stroke-related illness)
Career highlights
Lewis's writing career began with Dearth of a Salesman (1957), followed by Insomnia is Good for You (1957), Five names for Johnny (1957), Web (1957-58), The Voodoo Factor (1959-60), Ghost Squad (1961), Up Jumped a Swagman (1965), The Prisoner (1967, as Joshua Adam), Love Story (1965-67), Who-Dun-It (1969), Suspicion (1971) and Special Branch (1970/74).
Facts
Lewis wrote the original story for Pyramids of Mars, but when script editor Robert Holmes rewrote it with new themes, Lewis asked for the story to be transmitted under the pseudonym Stephen Harris. After serving in the RAF during the war, Lewis became a journalist on the London Evening Standard, then dabbled as a sketch writer for the Goons on the radio. After writing for Doctor Who, Lewis turned to teaching at the University of Tel Aviv. Lewis suffered a heart attack in 1983, and then a stroke in 1984.

Robert Holmes (script editor and writer (uncredited)) Apr 2 1926 to May 24 1986 (chronic liver ailment)
Doctor Who credits
Wrote: The Krotons (1968-69), The Space Pirates (1969), Spearhead from Space (1970), Terror of the Autons (1971), Carnival of Monsters (1973), The Time Warrior (1973-74), The Ark in Space (1975), Pyramids of Mars (1975, uncredited), The Brain of Morbius (1976, uncredited), The Deadly Assassin (1976), The Talons of Weng-Chiang (1977), The Sun Makers (1977), The Ribos Operation (1978), The Power of Kroll (1978-79), The Caves of Androzani (1984), The Two Doctors (1985), The Trial of a Time Lord (1986)
Script edited: Robot, The Ark in Space (uncredited), The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, Planet of Evil, Pyramids of Mars, The Android Invasion, The Brain of Morbius, The Seeds of Doom, The Masque of Mandragora, The Hand of Fear, The Deadly Assassin (uncredited), The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang (uncredited), Horror of Fang Rock, The Invisible Enemy, Image of the Fendahl, The Sun Makers (uncredited) (1974-78)
Career highlights
He began writing for TV as early as Knight Errant Limited (1960), and went on to write scripts for Deadline Midnight (1961), Ghost Squad (1962), Emergency Ward 10 (1962-63), Dr Finlay's Casebook (1964-65), Undermind (1965), No Hiding Place (1965-67), Public Eye (1965-68), Mr Rose (1967-68), Doomwatch (1971), Spyder's Web (1972), Dixon of Dock Green (1974), Jukes of Piccadilly (1980), The Nightmare Man (1981), Blake's 7 (1979/81), Into the Labyrinth (1981-82) and Bergerac (1983-87). He was also story editor on Armchair Thriller and Shoestring, both in 1980.
Facts
Robert was the youngest ever commissioned officer in the Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders, serving in Burma. After he left the Army he joined the police, then became a journalist and sports writer - he was the last ever editor of British lifestyle publication John Bull Magazine in 1964. He was originally going to write Doctor Who's 20th anniversary tale in 1983, but when he found the numerous elements he'd been asked to incorporate unworkable, he was replaced by Terrance Dicks. Robert died while writing the final two episodes of The Trial of a Time Lord, and due to tensions in the Doctor Who production office at the time, his original ending for the story had to be changed and written afresh by Pip and Jane Baker. His face was also one of those seen during the Time Lord mind battle in The Brain of Morbius.

Paddy Russell (director) Jul 4 1928 to Nov 2 2017
Doctor Who credits
Directed: The Massacre of St Bartholomew's Eve (1966), Invasion of the Dinosaurs (1974), Pyramids of Mars (1975), Horror of Fang Rock (1977)
Career highlights
Paddy had worked in the 1950s as production assistant on various Rudolph Cartier shows, as well as the Quatermass serials and the 1954 adaptation of George Orwell's 1984. Paddy also directed for Compact (1962), The Mind of the Enemy (1965), The Newcomers (1967), Late Night Horror (1968), Little Women (1970), The Moonstone (1972), Harriet's Back in Town (1973), My Old Man (1975), Z Cars (1967-76), Within These Walls (1975-76), 3-2-1 (1979-80), The Omega Factor (1979), The Squad (1980) and Pick of the Week (1988).
Facts
Along with Julia Smith (who directed two Doctor Who stories in 1966/67), Paddy was one of the first two female directors for the BBC. After she retired, Paddy moved to the Yorkshire Moors and lived in relative seclusion, but worked for various cat charities.

Philip Hinchcliffe (producer) Born Oct 1 1944
Doctor Who credits
Produced: The Ark in Space, The Sontaran Experiment, Genesis of the Daleks, Revenge of the Cybermen, Terror of the Zygons, Planet of Evil, Pyramids of Mars, The Android Invasion, The Brain of Morbius, The Seeds of Doom, The Masque of Mandragora, The Hand of Fear, The Deadly Assassin, The Face of Evil, The Robots of Death, The Talons of Weng-Chiang (1975-77)
Career highlights
Doctor Who was one of Philip's first TV jobs, after being script editor on Alexander the Greatest (1971), You're Only Young Twice (1971), The Jensen Code (1973) and The Kids from 47A (1973-74). After leaving Doctor Who, Philip became producer on Target (1977-78), Private Schulz (1981), Nancy Astor (1982), Strangers and Brothers (1984), The Charmer (1987), Bust (1987-88), Friday On My Mind (1992), An Awfully Big Adventure (1995), Seesaw (1998), McCallum (1998), Rebus (2000-01) and Taggart (1999-2001). Philip has also written scripts for Crossroads (1970), Target (1977) and Bust (1987-88), and novelised three Doctor Who stories for Target Books.
Facts
Philip won the 1990 Prix Europa Fiction Prize for And a Nightingale Sang, a film adapted from C P Taylor's play by screenwriter Jack Rosenthal. In 1977 he was nominated for a BAFTA for his work on Doctor Who, and received a further nomination for Private Schulz. There was also an Emmy nomination for Nancy Astor, a mini-series he produced in 1982. His daughter Celina Hinchcliffe is a British TV sports presenter, including for SkySports. His brother-in-law is actor Geoffrey Whitehead. In 2014 Philip returned to the world of Doctor Who by writing two new audio serials for the Fourth Doctor and Leela for Big Finish Productions.

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